Wolf spider ID?

Can a more accomplished spider autist help me ID this female Lycosidae?
I caught her on a warm night in late May, in the Midwestern US.
She's fairly large, around 0.75" body length with a leg span of 1.5"-2", and easily takes large crickets.
At first I thought maybe Hogna Carolinensis, but the more I look the more I lean towards Tigrosa Aspersa, but am not certain.
I took a few blurry pictures while cleaning her terrarium, I hope they're clear enough. Thanks for the help bros.

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  1. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I did my undergraduate research on ethology in wolf spiders amd I like this thread a lot

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Whats the best wolf spider anon?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      how can I communicate with them?

  2. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    when i was a kid, i caught one of these with an egg sac attached to it. put it in a jar and brought it to school science teacher who made a big deal about it. next day spider was gone. i asked the teacher what happened. he said the egg sac broke and a thousand tiny spiders were swarming in the jar so he dumped them out the window into the courtyard

  3. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tigrosa Helluo would be my guess, picrel

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Possibly. OP needs better pictures.

  4. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    this spider is straight

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      And named Jessie

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      debunked by snopes and politifact

  5. 10 months ago
    sage

    Cute carolina wolfie

  6. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm going to lean torwards Hogna. Mostly due to the location you found it in, Tigrosa is found more on the east coast, though they can be found a little more inland. The longer pattern on it's abdomen also leads me to think hogna. Tigrosas TEND to have a spottier pattern on the abdomen more than a single longer pattern in the center. And Tigrosa usually have banded legs, hence the name.

  7. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Looks like a pretty textbook example of a Hogna carolinensis to me. Tigrosas can be pretty easily distinguished from Hognas because of their striped legs, which Hognas lack.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm going to lean torwards Hogna. Mostly due to the location you found it in, Tigrosa is found more on the east coast, though they can be found a little more inland. The longer pattern on it's abdomen also leads me to think hogna. Tigrosas TEND to have a spottier pattern on the abdomen more than a single longer pattern in the center. And Tigrosa usually have banded legs, hence the name.

      Wow, that would be great, I have been after a Hogna for a while. A lot of the examples I've seen seem to have lighter grey coloration, with less brown, so I wasn't sure.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's not much difference honestly. Tigrosa use to be classified as Hogna Aspersa about ten years ago.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          *There's

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes I read about that. I was most excited about the potential size H.C. can reach, never had a non tarantula over about 2" leg span. Not sure how many molts she has left, time will tell.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm going to lean torwards Hogna. Mostly due to the location you found it in, Tigrosa is found more on the east coast, though they can be found a little more inland. The longer pattern on it's abdomen also leads me to think hogna. Tigrosas TEND to have a spottier pattern on the abdomen more than a single longer pattern in the center. And Tigrosa usually have banded legs, hence the name.

      Are these legs not banded? Honestly asking.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Not like a Tigrosa.

  8. 10 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous
      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Next to my wedding band for rough scale.

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