Why do adults keep pets in cages? What type of person derives satisfaction from such an arrangement?

Why do adults keep pets in cages? What type of person derives satisfaction from such an arrangement? Are they just low-empathy individuals?
Of course, it depends on the animal. Highly social animals like guinea pigs may work even with a comparatively small cage, as another member provides sufficient stimuli.

Tarantula -- sure, whatever.
Leon the lobster -- I believe lobster inner life is rather complex for being a sea bug, but again, alright
Small snake or lizard -- starting to get questionable here. The question I would ask myself is: does this species in the wild roam a lot? If yes, then I consider keeping such a reptile borderline mistreatment.
Mouse -- it depends on the size of the cage. If it's just a small desktop cage, then how do people think this is a stimulating life for the mouse?
Tiny bird -- keeping a bird a majority of the day behind bars seems to me extremely immoral, and I'd only consider a (significant fraction of a) room-sized cage proper.
Parrot or other bigger bird -- this is just straight up cruelty. One hour outside the cage a day, if the wagecuck owning this pet didn't have overtime that day, doesn't really make up for the other 23 hours.
Rabbit -- literally why.

In case some of you were dropped on the head as a babby and can't parse my intent: of course my solution is to let the snakes and rats roam liberally inside your apartment, like God intended. No, you dumb frick, I say we just should not keep rats and other such animals as pets, unless we actually have non-trivial means for making their life amenable, like mentioned half-room sized cage.

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    When we’re on the road my guinea pigs live in a folding spill tray like pic related. It’s nine square feet, reasonably spacious for the two of them. Thing is they could hop over those 4” walls anytime they wanted to, but they never ever do. I’ve owned several generations, never been a problem. Some pets are really comfy in their cages.

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    You just don't know how good it feels to posses a living thing. To be its god.

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous
  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >Parrot or other bigger bird -- this is just straight up cruelty. One hour outside the cage a day, if the wagecuck owning this pet didn't have overtime that day, doesn't really make up for the other 23 hours.
    Idk why am average person wants to own a exotic bird like a parrot
    These guys are like high tier animals that really need attention and care to watch out for them
    >one hour out of cage
    Even that I think it’s too little, especially the size
    I have two green amazons, and I pretty much let ‘em out the whole day until they fly back to their cage, and that’s usually when I refill their food and such

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Because I love my Guinea piggies and want to keep them as safe as possible. Don’t think I could do it to a bird though.
    all my piggies get a lot of free roam. obviously you can’t keep animals without sanctioning off areas for them. Sometimes cage is most safe.
    Also have a ball python in a 150 gal tank. Idk about him. Whenever he comes out he just wants to go back to the tank.
    None of these can survive outside so can’t really just let them go

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I had 2 budgies.
    The cage door was open 24/7 and yet i saw them sitting inside most of the time.
    I even went outside in the garden with one of them and he didn't fly away.
    Some animals like to be captive and just chill their life.

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >Tiny bird -- keeping a bird a majority of the day behind bars seems to me extremely immoral,
    My daughter has 5 budgies and 4 of them won't leave the cage. Actually one won't leave her nest and we have to keep replacing her eggs with marbles and whatnot. The oldest wiener will venture out breifly, fly around and play in plants for a few, but he'sright back on the cage. Other budgies I've had would only leave the cage when they wanted human attention. I'd leave the door open, or they would open it themselves. Other than that, they go right back in and stay there. Sometimes they like to sit on the top but rarely leave the cage. They feel security in thier homes. But, this is a good thing because you don't want them flying around shitting everywhere and chewing stuff up.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      are they fat or old? you need to foce them out if they fatties or put them on diet

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      My grandmothers conures do the same thing. They can open the doors yet stay in most of the time

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >rabbits
    >why
    They are livestock.

    Only the birds are even aware of their captivity.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I don't want to talk about what happened to the rabbit I had inside a cage when I was a kid, but it was gruesome.

      And my female hamster eating her offspring was what made me stop having caged fluffy balls for pets. They DO become stressed over food resources and space. Keeping animals caged is a cruel practice.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Rabbits should have a large wooden Hutch, not a cage.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        if i will kill and eat an animal why do i care about what it should have to be supposedly comfortable or just not agitated or however you describe the "mental state" of an automaton
        if i thought it had any thoughts or feelings worth considering i would not kill it and eat it unless i were starving

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Rabbits can have whatever they need to be comfy and healthy.
        The best way to keep pet rabbits is indoor anyways. But if you're keeping them for livestock then cages are always the best middle ground between least cruel and most efficient.
        Picrel is how most people keep quail. Another way of doing it is in a run, like chickens (they can't be free ranged). But if the quails are your livelihood and you own hundreds, runs arent realistic, and these cages aren't abusive or cruel.
        Most meat quail dont make it past a few months.

  9. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I want to keep crawfish in my water troughs so I can snack on them at my leisure. Explain how I could do that without keeping them in a cage?

  10. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Hot take, if the frequently animal roams the entire enclosure, the enclosure is too small. I can probably count the times I've seen my clownfish on the other side of their tank on one hand.

  11. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >Are they just low-empathy individuals?
    You already know the answer to this.

  12. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    You're right, but the world isn't ready for the truth.

  13. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    DESPITE ALL MY RAGE
    I'M STILL JUST A RAT IN A CAGE

  14. 1 year ago
    Anonymous
  15. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >Rabbit -- literally why
    Because they end up chewing everything including power cables which can kill them, also people usually have a dog or cat as well and they hunt and kill rabbits

  16. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Because most animals will hurt themselves, harm or kill people or frick up something in your house if kept free
    Why would you want a free roaming snake in your house? Lmao

  17. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Animals like being caged up, there was a study

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Unironically true in a way, most small animals don't care for anything but to eat and mate. Decoration and such is for humans benefit because they make us think animal is 'happier.' But no fish thinks it is in the Amazon no matter how biotope is the tank.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >But no fish thinks it is in the Amazon no matter how biotope is the tank.
        True, but most commonly kept fish actually are sensitive to having some sort of decor. A fish that doesn’t have something around it that satisfies the instinct for “this is a safe enough place to linger around” will display stress behaviors, have a shittier immune system, and refuse to frick (except for the species where stress makes them horny). The type of and how much stuff it takes for a fish to feel “secure” depends on the species and varies way more than I have room to type; some are satisfied with just a single piece of pvc pipe (it often can even be a transparent pipe), others “need” a bunch of junk breaking up line-of-sight, some simply “need” to see lots of other tiny fish nearby who are behaving calmly.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Fish don't know what the Amazon is

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Noooope.

      t. Had rabbits and hamsters that stressed themselves to death when I was a kid.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/Z1XAXWc.jpg

      Why do adults keep pets in cages? What type of person derives satisfaction from such an arrangement? Are they just low-empathy individuals?
      Of course, it depends on the animal. Highly social animals like guinea pigs may work even with a comparatively small cage, as another member provides sufficient stimuli.

      Tarantula -- sure, whatever.
      Leon the lobster -- I believe lobster inner life is rather complex for being a sea bug, but again, alright
      Small snake or lizard -- starting to get questionable here. The question I would ask myself is: does this species in the wild roam a lot? If yes, then I consider keeping such a reptile borderline mistreatment.
      Mouse -- it depends on the size of the cage. If it's just a small desktop cage, then how do people think this is a stimulating life for the mouse?
      Tiny bird -- keeping a bird a majority of the day behind bars seems to me extremely immoral, and I'd only consider a (significant fraction of a) room-sized cage proper.
      Parrot or other bigger bird -- this is just straight up cruelty. One hour outside the cage a day, if the wagecuck owning this pet didn't have overtime that day, doesn't really make up for the other 23 hours.
      Rabbit -- literally why.

      In case some of you were dropped on the head as a babby and can't parse my intent: of course my solution is to let the snakes and rats roam liberally inside your apartment, like God intended. No, you dumb frick, I say we just should not keep rats and other such animals as pets, unless we actually have non-trivial means for making their life amenable, like mentioned half-room sized cage.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        This implies that the cows and indeed the other animals have any concept of both death or their own circumstances.
        So long as all their needs are being met then who cares where they get it from? Of course some animals needs simply cannot be met in a STANDARD home setup (parrots and hamsters).

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >So long as all their needs are being met
          Animals, like hamsters and squirrels plan ahead months from the present. You cannot set their mind to a "you have enough food" mindset.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah thats why I said animals like hamsters can very rarely get their needs met in a standard home setup dumbass.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              Sorry about the misunderstanding. Sometimes parts of text I'm reading go completely blank and doesn't take much for this to happen. I might be having early stage Alzheimer and it's super scary to think about it

              If you meant the same then sorry, didn't meant to override your words with mine.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Oh shit it's cool bro. Sorry about the potential brain disorder

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Pretty sure dogs do. They're just terrible at realizing what can kill them.

          >Oh no balto we're on the 14th floor don't jump off there? Please, I'll just double jump mid air to move to another balcony. If I miss the landing, I'll spread my legs to slow my fall and glide to a lower level, then kick off the walls to work my way back up. I got this.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >what can an elephant actually do?

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