Why did human cultures around the world create dragons? Are snakes that interesting?

Why did human cultures around the world create dragons? Are snakes that interesting?

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  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Surviving dinosaurs after the flood

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    the dragon seems to be a combination of all our primal fears. scales, body shape and tongue of a snake. claws and teeth like a large feline. wings/ability to fly like a bird of prey. the ultimate villan

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      And on the other end the dragon is Said to represent every part of the remaining animals of the Chinese zodiac.

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    snakes live rent free in the brains of primates.
    As long as it looks vaguely snake-like our brain starts going eild

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Snakes have been hunting mammals since before the dinosaurs. There are parts of our brain hardwired from birth specifically for the tasks of recognizing and reacting to them

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Snakes have been hunting mammals since before the dinosaurs.
      Snakes evolved during the Cretaceous.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      snakes live rent free in the brains of primates.
      As long as it looks vaguely snake-like our brain starts going eild

      False

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Drugs or mental illnesses. Human brains interact with structural and neurochemical imbalances in roughly the same ways. Could be dreams too.
    Any scenario leading to mass neuron blocks, whether it be through deliriants or through stimulant overdoses, results in unpleasant, primal, basal ganglia hallucinations. This means basic animalistic pattern recognition fears of the most dangerous shapes - spiders, snakes, insects, other people. Anything that can 1-shot a primate.

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    A quarter of a million years ago some caveman killed a big snake or crocodile that was ambushing people at their source of water. It was so cool everyone kept talking about it until every human being on earth had heard the story in some form or another.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      no, that was only 800 years ago, the tarasque

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        The Tarasque wasn't killed by one person, it was stoned by a village.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          that doesnt change anything. i mea nare you telling me that you wouldnt tell a story about how you and a bunch of your mates killed a dragon with some rocks

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can find monters versions of any animal; monster birds, monster bugs, monster horses...

  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Snakes hold super important mythical significance because the molting symbolizes rebirth. That's why snake is the symbol of Jesus Christ and Asclepius is associated with snakes.

  9. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I mean, just look at it

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      >EA Agartha has entered the lobby.

  10. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Only eastern dragons look like snakes. Western ones look like lizards. Still a strange phenomenon

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Western ones were based on snakes too.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Some were I guess, but the more classical ones are clearly lizard inspired

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          no they were based on snakes. They were snakes. In fact the word dragon means snake.
          Dragons turned into lizards with Christianity as an association with the biblical beast of the apocalypse

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Snakes are lizards.

  11. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    There’s giant bones made of rocks all over the world

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Wrong answer.

      https://i.imgur.com/Nb0cOkU.jpg

      Why did human cultures around the world create dragons? Are snakes that interesting?

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/*Trito#Serpent-slaying_myth
      Humans are naturally inclined to certain beliefs due to universal cultural heritages and experiences. Most common of all these myths is that of the Chaoskampf, the struggle between Order and Chaos as represented by a paternal hero defeating a water serpent. There have been many theories as to what this represents (battles with crocodiles or poisonous snakes, securing of fresh water, snakes are limbless and chaotic thus perfect motifs for chaos, etc) but the fact is it's worldwide.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >the fact is it's worldwide
        because of the giant bones all over the world

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Except none of these myths have anything to do with bones. Does Japan have dinosaur bones? No? Then frick off.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            they are seafarers and have plenty of shoreline for weird stuff to wash up on

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            It didn't have to the yayoi arrived really late to jomon occupied japan.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            A Trader comes to your land with stories of massive bones found in the desert from an ancient beast and then shows you a tooth made of stone larger than any tooth you've ever seen.
            It's not hard to imagine stories of giant monsters spreading from found fossils
            >Does Japan have dinosaur bones? No? Then frick off.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fukuiraptor
            Nice attempt moron

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Snakes hold a very primordial fear instinct in humans (all mammals really) because they were our ancestor's predators. This is why all hero myths involve a man slaying a great serpent, it represents the triumph of man over nature, or order over chaos if you prefer it like that.

        Water almost always represents chaotic nature in myths so it makes sense a lot of monsters come from water. It is a medium that is alien to us terrestial animals and thus fear it deeply.

        Drugs or mental illnesses. Human brains interact with structural and neurochemical imbalances in roughly the same ways. Could be dreams too.
        Any scenario leading to mass neuron blocks, whether it be through deliriants or through stimulant overdoses, results in unpleasant, primal, basal ganglia hallucinations. This means basic animalistic pattern recognition fears of the most dangerous shapes - spiders, snakes, insects, other people. Anything that can 1-shot a primate.

        This has been written by chatgpt.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          You were written by ChatGPT.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            dont post thos stupid ass replies then fr fr

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Mind you, this theme of serpent slaying is near exclusively a Proto-Indo European construct, that article says as much, I.e. the religions and mythologies that talk about the slaying of serpents pretty my much all came from a root source, the Proto-Indo Europeans, so there’s clearly something more cultural going on, it makes sense that not everywhere on the planet has myths about snakes, or at least not ones fighting them, I don’t think there’s anything Polynesian about it, and the Aztecs/Mayans seemed to outright worship them in the form of Quetzalcoatl, so clearly this ‘hatred’ of them isn’t quite universal

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >and the Aztecs/Mayans seemed to outright worship them in the form of Quetzalcoatl
          There is the slaying of Tlaltecuhtli that was something resembling a toad, another water monster representing chaos and whose body served to create the earth and the sky. AS you said they seem to worship snakes but still use water creatures to represent chaos in their myths.

          There are also drqagon/snake slaying myths in asian mythology. Even Japan has snakes that are slain like Orochi.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            > There is the slaying of Tlaltecuhtli that was something resembling a toad, another water monster representing chaos and whose body served to create the earth and the sky. AS you said they seem to worship snakes but still use water creatures to represent chaos in their myths.
            Yes, that would make sense, I agree that water is a good representation of chaos, though I don’t think its a universal thing, most snakes aren’t aquatic for example
            > Even Japan has snakes that are slain like Orochi.
            Which is Indo-European influenced. China probably has some too but they also had a healthy Indo-European influence on them as well. Egypt has one too, which would make sense given how prominent snakes are over there.

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