What's the rarest animal you've ever seen?

What's the rarest animal you've ever seen?

Can be either rare to your area in general or just rare in the sense that not many even exist to begin with.

Mine is a flying squirrel. They only come out at night and are naturally hard to see just by default, but last year one came to my suet feeder a few times and I was lucky to see it in the porch light.

Not my pic but he looked pretty much just like this with the thick tail and big eyes.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure I saw a whooping crane once.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Only exist in 4 islands in the Balkans, came across a big dead on during a hike, it was about 24 inches long.
    It was hefty too, pretty thick and heavy, it was during late spring and the bushes were full of partridge chicks scurrying around so plenty of prey around for them.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Saw some of these guys. Mauritius Olive White-eye. Critically endangered and endemic to a small patch of forest in Mauritius which is already a tiny country. Only about 200-300 estimated to be left

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Olive White-eye
      Well, can’t say it wasn’t named appropriately

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A Shetland cow! There are less than 300 left on the planet.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >There are less than 300 left on the planet.
      There's no way that's true.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/GRhMVYl.jpeg

        A Shetland cow! There are less than 300 left on the planet.

        It's not true, and that pic isn't even a Shetland cow. No idea what that anon is smoking
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shetland_cattle
        >There are currently 800 registered breeding cows and an average of 180 calves born each year

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's a highland cow not a Shetland cow, and there's loads of them

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Orange-bellied Parrot, they live where I grew up. Only a few in the wild these days

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I was just knocked over by his extreme cuteness.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A bald eagle in northeast Georgia

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I literally saw two yesterday in Delaware. They're all over the fricking place here
      https://baytobaynews.com/stories/bald-eagles-soaring-in-delaware,83183

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i want to believe i saw a pack of dire wolves kill an elk outside of Estes Colorado from my grandfathers summerhome in 2008, the biggest of them had to be about 4'3 at the shoulder but most of the pack were a little over 3 feet tall. they looked like gray wolves but where a bit brighter grays and didnt appear to have any brown or beige marking. it couldn't have been and mostly likely was a pack of gray wolves my child mind contorted but to me they dont really look the same. iv seen them in enclosures and in pictures and they still dont match exactly what i remember

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Dire wolves aren't actually bigger than wolves basically at all, and their main differences are mostly color and head shape. Grey wolves are HUGE. Still very rare to see a pack of wolves period, though.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Arowana? Maybe?
    Local Chinese restaurant used to have a frickhugeic one in their tank. I've mentioned it before and I think Wauf told me they're illegal in the US so either they were breaking the law or I mistook some other weird-looking humongofish for an arowana.
    Haven't been to that place in 15 years so I don't know if they're even still there never mind if the fish is.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Asian arowanas were illegal for a while, but they started captive breeding them in the 90's so those are ok to own now. Expensive though.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      if it was a chinese place it was probably added to the menu

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I was visiting my aunt's rural home years ago and saw a cougar walk across her front lawn. This was in Aitkin, Minnesota.
    >Statewide, the DNR has only verified 77 cougar appearances in the state since 2004
    I had no idea they were this rare here. It even lists them as "extinct or severely reduced population." I feel very lucky.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I was walking my dog at night in central Florida and we came upon an armadillo. I'd never seen one before. We just kinda followed it for a while, as it scrounged around in the dirt. I'm not even sure the stupid thing was aware of me and my dog. Eventually we got bored and left. I've since seen several 'dillos.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They look so prehistoric, I can never get over it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      from west FL, armadillo are pretty common in FL from what I understand. seen them a few times, they sound like a tank walking across the driveway at night

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I had one get in my house once and I shot it with a pellet gun

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm just going to count my area.
    I've seen both a flying squirrel and a fisher cat on my trail cam, fishers dont officially range in this area anymore, so it was interesting.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The fire bug I guess. Maybe not rare globally but is supposed to be rare in my home country

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It was probably introduced there from Europe, in Europe these are everywhere and are as common as flies.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Some kind of weasel thing, he got in the garage and attacked my dad's boot.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I heard condors are migrating up the west coast and settling into northern regions. Someone at a wildlife refuge told me he hopes he'll see them in Oregon some day. I don't know, but I'd like to see one.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They are being released in Northern California. You might get lucky, but the numbers are still so small.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A good person

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Shut up moron

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        you're kind of proving his point

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I saw a golden coqui. They're not really rare on the island, but the fact you can't find them anywhere but Puerto Rico so I made it something I had to see during my trip. The golden part was pure luck.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >They're not really rare on the island,
      they're literally extinct

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Scientists think it's possibly extinct because it hasn't been seen or documented for over 40 years and you say it's supposedly "not really rare on the island"
      At least make it believable it takes 10 seconds to Google something.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    California Condor which are critically endangered
    Florida Scrub Jay, Bonnethead shark, and Blue whale which are endangered
    Great tailed Grackle in Florida (first specimen ever recorded in the state)

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Probably not "rare" by the standard definition but I only ever saw this guy once in the wild and not in a zoo and that was only because I went out for a walk at night.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Where in Australia are you? I've seen these guys many times, including during the day, and I'm in suburban brissie. Very common here

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen a koala quite a few times

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In the wild btw
      Almost always at night and accidentally, walking through forest and parkland
      One time I was going to get a kebab at 11 pm and one of them was lugging itself up a tree as it saw me, then kind of stared at me when it thought it was far up enough to be safe from me (I'm no danger anyway lol)

      You can also hear the horny male koalas a lot in the forest. They sound very unlike you would expect a moronic herbivorous teddy bear to sound.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Probably this one
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_green_macaw
    Theres a bunch of these guys visiting very regularly too
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_American_squirrel_monkey

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Thylacine. Australian government firebombs areas they're reported in, so everyone keeps their mouth shut but they're still around.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Australian government firebombs areas they're reported in,
      wtf why

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Mining rights. If thylacines were confirmed to exist, they'd have to be protected.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          That's ridiculous, why would the aussies not protect such an important animal just for some mining rights?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Thylacines dont get you much money if you're the .gov. Probably wouldn't even bring much more tourists, because they wouldnt see them anyways. Mining companies on the other hand give you a bunch of tax revenue and mining lobbyists pay for your next election campaign.
            They are still very much alive in both tasmania and new guinea.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Let's say we discovered a thylacine tomorrow. The first thing that would happen is a swarm of news media and enviromental activists descending on Tasmania, demanding that half the island be closed off to economic activity. The Australian government, on the other hand, has conducted numerous studies on the thylacine's long term viability, and they all come up with "it's either dead already or it will die out soon". So the official position is to help the extinction along.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's pretty much the same story with sasquatch. You hear about logging companies fighting guerilla tactics against them because if they were revealed to the public millions of square miles of forest would become protected and the loggers would go out of business.

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I got a picture of mine

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    California Condor, ~300 in the wild. Other birds I have seen are rare just because you have to go out of your way to find them, like Gyrfalcon.

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hmmm, I guess the blue iguana. They’re endangered (but doing better) and we have the only ones on the planet. I myself haven’t seen one in the wild for years. Very beautiful

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Jesus that’s blue.

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not a rare species but a rare individual, i saw what i'm pretty sure was a melanistic pidgeon when i went to college. Even its legs and beak were black

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      On the rare-species note, I once saw a fire-bellied toad in a ditch in the US

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      homie pigeon

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen black squirrels only twice in my whole life.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Really? They're all over the place where I live.

  28. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin%27s_fox

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Current estimates of the total population are still low, with an estimated minimum 227 individuals on the mainland and 412 on Chiloé Island.

      Damn. I never even heard of this animal before. Nice find.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It looked exactly the same as a regular south American gray fox except a bit darker and I saw it from afar when I was visiting the island, so it might as well just be one. It was still cool tho

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