What do you think is "objectively" the weirdest animal or organism?

What do you think is "objectively" the weirdest animal or organism? Like the ones you're shocked are even in their family. My guess would be sacculina, it's insane to me how they're more related to crabs or ants than some type of flat worm or flukes. My other picks would be ship worms, tunicates and barnacles in general.

Ape Out Shirt $21.68

Yakub: World's Greatest Dad Shirt $21.68

Ape Out Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    why the frick is it all underwater

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Cliones.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      You can eat those things, wonder what they taste like

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Glass sponges just don't make sense.

    You're telling me the simplest form of multicellular life on earth learned how to make glass and then weave it like thread into a spire?

    And generations after generations of symbiotic shrimp live and die inside the structure of the spire

    And they might live for 15,000 fricking years?! how the frick are these things real

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Predatory sponges. They look like alien architecture, and are generally just fricking bizarre to think about

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      You think that's bizarre? How about an amoeba that steals parts from sponges so it can basically function like a sponge? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiculosiphon_oceana

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/QvZyEwz.jpg

      Glass sponges just don't make sense.

      You're telling me the simplest form of multicellular life on earth learned how to make glass and then weave it like thread into a spire?

      And generations after generations of symbiotic shrimp live and die inside the structure of the spire

      And they might live for 15,000 fricking years?! how the frick are these things real

      This is the fakest organism I have ever seen

      https://i.imgur.com/KaAAK2f.jpg

      You think that's bizarre? How about an amoeba that steals parts from sponges so it can basically function like a sponge? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiculosiphon_oceana

      >4–5 cm
      >unicellular
      I know about valeria ventricosa and algae, but I did not know there were several diverse examples of cell the size of lizards. Wonder how many more are swimming around down there

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        *fakest-looking

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >but I did not know there were several diverse examples of cell the size of lizards. Wonder how many more are swimming around down there
        Have another, fren. I personally think it's almost certainly the case that pre-Ediacaran there were far more giant, unicellular organisms that roamed the Ocean floor. Due to them likely being unmineralized though(as mineralization is seemingly a means of protecting oneself from animal predation first and foremost) it is unlikely we'll find all too much evidence of this. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gromia_sphaerica
        Also there's Xenophyophores, larger 'cousins' to Gromia that get significantly larger tests than them. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenophyophorea

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/MzgWe2h.jpg

      [...]
      This is the fakest organism I have ever seen

      [...]
      >4–5 cm
      >unicellular
      I know about valeria ventricosa and algae, but I did not know there were several diverse examples of cell the size of lizards. Wonder how many more are swimming around down there

      midcentury animals

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/MzgWe2h.jpg

      [...]
      This is the fakest organism I have ever seen

      [...]
      >4–5 cm
      >unicellular
      I know about valeria ventricosa and algae, but I did not know there were several diverse examples of cell the size of lizards. Wonder how many more are swimming around down there

      Looks like something straight out of Subnautica.
      Great thread

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Nom nom

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    crab are everywhere wtf

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Invertebrates disgust me. Vertebrates have progressively evolved towards higher levels of consciousness and intelligence but stuff like OP's pic feel closer to bacteria and viruses than animals.

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Therapsids are funny, they look a bit like some of the first Pokemon

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Didn't they recently name a therapsid bulbasaurus?

  9. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone got any journals or literature about porocephalus or armillifer? I just found out about porocephaliasis and it scares the shit out of me.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Don't eat snakes.

  10. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Viruses because they are not even alive

  11. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    anything that’s supposed to live outside and tries to live inside with me other than my pets

    spiders, centipedes and moths outside? kinda neat. inside of my domicile? instant fight reaction and slipper ctrl+x

    if they’re unlucky the cats find them first and eat them, this one loves eating spiders

    • 1 year ago
      Dream Island Obsessional Park

      What about lizards and frogs?

  12. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    It has eyes but no brain
    How the frick does it see?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I mean it doesn't have a centralized brain but it has neurons, right? A brain is just a centralized bundle of neurons, more or less. Also hormones can be used in response to the light it detects(think the parietal eye of amphibians and lizards and how it affects their circadian rhythm). Even single-celled organisms detect and respond to light.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I mean it doesn't have a centralized brain but it has neurons, right? A brain is just a centralized bundle of neurons, more or less. Also hormones can be used in response to the light it detects(think the parietal eye of amphibians and lizards and how it affects their circadian rhythm). Even single-celled organisms detect and respond to light.

      You don't get it, the visual information is not being sent to our plane.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >>>/x/

  13. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    homosexual sapiens

  14. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I hate parasites in general. Imagine evolving just to feed off some other organism's nutrients and becoming so dependent on them you actually die without your host? This insect's females don't even exit their hosts and live only to reproduce
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strepsiptera

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Things are very different for male and female strepsiptera. Males look like you’d expect, with wings and antennae and mandibles and big, beautiful eyes. The females? Not so much. “The female is like a bag of eggs,” said entomologist Jeyaraney Kathirithamby of the University of Oxford. “Just a mere bag of eggs.” This is no exaggeration. “The female has nothing—no eyes, no antennae. It has no mouth parts. It’s nothing.” She spends almost her entire life in the host, so what good would things like limbs do? Accordingly, she’s evolved into what is essentially just an oval of flesh.
      >Importantly, though, the one thing she does have are naughty bits: the oviduct.
      Damn.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Things are very different for male and female strepsiptera. Males look like you’d expect, with wings and antennae and mandibles and big, beautiful eyes. The females? Not so much. “The female is like a bag of eggs,” said entomologist Jeyaraney Kathirithamby of the University of Oxford. “Just a mere bag of eggs.” This is no exaggeration. “The female has nothing—no eyes, no antennae. It has no mouth parts. It’s nothing.” She spends almost her entire life in the host, so what good would things like limbs do? Accordingly, she’s evolved into what is essentially just an oval of flesh.
      >Importantly, though, the one thing she does have are naughty bits: the oviduct.
      Damn.

      >In all strepsipterans the male mates by rupturing the female's cuticle (in the case of Stylopida, this is in a deep narrow fissure of the cephalothorax near the birth canal). Sperm passes through the opening directly into the body in a process called traumatic insemination, which has independently evolved in some other insects like bed bugs.
      >Strepsiptera eggs hatch inside the female, and the planidium larvae can move around freely within the female's haemocoel; this behavior is unique to these insects. The offspring consume their mother from the inside in a process known as hemocelous viviparity.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      This is truly fricking strange. I am both fascinated and appalled at how specialized parasite behavior gets.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      This reminds me of those anglerfish where the males fuse with the females and basically function like sperm supplying organs

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      this degree of sexual dimorphism has always freaked me the frick out man. I understand that evolution's intent is to advance onto the best possible system under which life can continue to propogate but this shit just unsettles me.

  15. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    The Northern Stargazer

  16. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe I'm a basic b***h but sponges are pretty strange.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Literally the oldest known multicellular life on earth

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Very, very wrong. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francevillian_biota

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          *still alive

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Come on man, you can't do this to them. They were probably really cool and had their potential snuffed out before it could be fully realized.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >dirt nipples

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            I think it'd be more like scum nipples. I'm pretty sure the environment they lived in was dominated by bacterial mats.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          so we’re decolonizing 2bya eukaryotes now? or are the austrians just trolling the french?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Not quite the oldest but they're up there. Sponges are one of the OGs of this multi-cellular game and it's everything else that's objectively weird when you look at life on Earth from a chronological perspective, including us.

        • 1 year ago
          Dream Island Obsessional Park

          Dang, Spongebob is based and normal and we are all weirdo Patricks.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      the fact that ancient romans and greeks just saw these things and went
      >ahh yes, this will be a perfect tool to wipe the shit from my ass with
      will always be hilarious to me. you get one shot at life and you're born a sponge which higher beings use to clean their shit smeared anuses with.

  17. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Most arthropods bother me only because of how they're mouths typically look, it's strange compared to how us vertebrates use them

  18. 1 year ago
    It's a calugo btw

    First time i saw it i thought it wasn't real

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      i fricking love colugos m8. SEA has so many cool mammals. its a shame they all live in such hellish jungle habitats though. you cant really appreciate them until they're caged up, very sad. you might also like cuscus(es?). they're marsupial lemurs analogues but they also look like rat-cat hybrids.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        They have the same dick-shaped nose like Proboscis monkeys

  19. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Humans. Weirdest thing on this planet for sure. Most animals don't even know what to make of a human.

  20. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Bedbugs.
    Demonic little things.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >insects
      >trauma
      Doubt

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        X Truth
        It stabfricks an open wound through the female's exoskeleton

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          She was asking for it

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        moron

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      spray them with rubbing alcohol, kills them in 30 seconds

  21. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Stop using the word objectively wrong you stupid fricking homosexual

  22. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    This fish that has weird light sensitive organs instead of eyes

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      That's kinda cool.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      theres a few lizards with similar traits

      • 1 year ago
        Dream Island Obsessional Park

        https://i.imgur.com/a4cT7KO.jpg

        This fish that has weird light sensitive organs instead of eyes

        Yeah, most lizards(and other reptiles and amphibians I think) Have a 3rd 'eye', more like eyespots. Pretty freaky since they are vertebrates. .

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Have instructions for perfectly functional eyes in your genome

      >decide to develop satellite dishes with lower resolution than a game of snake on a Nokia from 1999

  23. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >sacculina
    >When a female Sacculina is implanted in a male crab, it interferes with the crab's hormonal balance. This sterilizes it and changes the bodily layout of the crab to resemble that of a female crab by widening and flattening its abdomen, among other things.
    >The female Sacculina then forces the crab's body to release hormones, causing it to act like a female crab, even to the point of performing female mating dances.
    >If the parasite is removed from the host, female crabs will normally regenerate new ovarian tissue, while males usually develop complete or partial ovaries instead of testes.
    B-bros?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Whoever desigbed this creature is extremely based.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        have a nice day now

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      so as a downside, you get sex-changed and force-impregged, but afterwards you're left a fully functioning female (usually)?

  24. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    i read about armored scale insects being the only obligate chimeras in existence
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC368156/

  25. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Insects are pretty god damn weird

    Every other animal
    >egg gets fertilized
    >cells becomes tiny version of animal
    >Tiny animal becomes big animal

    Insects
    >Be egg
    >turn in to weird worm thing
    >chill out for a bit
    >return to egg
    >completely dissolve yourself in to goop
    >become something completely different in every aspect.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      their lives are too short for simple growing, they need a fast and extreme way to grow up

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Some insects live longer than a lot of small mammals though

        • 1 year ago
          Dream Island Obsessional Park

          True, world smallest shrew and mammal(I think) lives like a year or so: some queen ants and termites live like a decade and a half.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Wait till you see what crustaceans and jellyfish go through

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        I'm listening.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Jellyfish reproduction has an asexual and sexual stage. It starts with the medusae fertilizing an egg with sperm like most animals, then this originates a larva, that after a while will find a place to settle and develop into a polyp that looks sort of like an anemone. After a while (they can stay in this stage for years) the polyp will split into several medusae and the cycle will start anew.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Also unlike most flying animals, their wings are not derived from limbs
      Not sure exactly how they developed them, i think there is more than one theory

  26. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    feather starfish and barnacles are weird as hell, oh, and basket stars

  27. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    This one.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      good pick, I hardly ever come across people who discuss these things. its a shame that mexico is such a shithole becuase their native fauna are, or atleast were, truly incredible. RIP vaquitas and those sweet ass bears that once lived in northern mexico

  28. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Extremophiles in general. Life finds a way no matter the environment and incidentally it's also gotten me to believe that extraterrestrial life is possible.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      My favorite is deinococcus radiodurans, literally the most radiation-resistant organism ever discovered.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        It isn’t just resistant to ionising radiation, it can use it for energy as well

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      possible but unlikely they'll ever be discovered, at least alive

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      extremophiles existing at all makes me certain that there must be life on europa. im sure it will just be extraterrestial greenland sharks or some shit but I know theyre there dammit.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      My dad was on the team that accidentally discovered life around deep sea vents. They'd found traces of life on exploration equipment before but figured it was just contamination from shallower depths.
      It was in the early hours of the morning when they realised that something was alive down there, spent until dawn pacing in circles (they were on a rig so hotbunking + don't wake up the boss unless it's an emergency) and collating all their data to be sent off for further analysis.
      They were all told that it's categorically scientifically impossible for life to exist in such conditions, so as soon as they realised it was entirely possible they were fretting about what else they don't know. Oil rigs really aren't places where "maybe" is an acceptable answer.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >scientifically impossible for life to exist in such conditions
        when will they learn

  29. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Nobody tell him.

  30. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Blanking on the name but there's a barnacle-like animal that once was a fully mobile species resembling a shrimp that evolved over millions of years to be fully sedentary. If you chop the barnacle-like creature in half you can see the atrophied legs, head, torso, etc of a shrimp half melted and surrounded by mollusk-like meat.
    That ring a bell to anyone?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Isn't that just barnacles in general?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      imagine the equivalent happening to a human
      Cronenberg wouldn't be able to capture the horror

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Comparison between Anelasma squalicola (left) and a more traditional filter feeding barnacle, Lepas sp (right).
      >Note the large peduncle and branching “roots” present on Anelasma.
      Parasitic barnacle. Pretty creepy frickers.
      https://sharkdevocean.wordpress.com/2015/10/23/shark-eating-barnacles/

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        It really does look like a half-melted shrimp. That's pretty cool.

  31. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Thread's already going there but humans, humans are pretty weird. Some neotenic lanky chimp baby, and it's literally everywhere. Eating everything, doing all sorts of things outside of it's niche.

    Fricking things creep me out.

  32. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Any of the weird round unicellular organisms as big as an eyeball or bigger. Like valonia ventricosa.
    Why do they exist and why do they give me a strange urge to slurp some cytoplasm with a straw?

  33. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >mammal without mammaries that just sweats milk
    >lays eggs instead of giving live birth
    >has a duck bill for a mouth but the bill is LEATHERY
    >males have venomous spurs that while not deadly are almost overkill with being excruciatingly painful
    >has the tail of a beaver, body of a chonky cat, fur of a river otter, and eyes of a fricking RABBIT of all things

    i dont give a flying frick if this is the vanilla choice these frickers are STILL something that feel like evolution pulled a slot machine with

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >also mesotherms with variable body temperature

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      without mammaries that just sweats milk
      >>lays eggs instead of giving live birth
      That's probably how all mammals started and it just didn't evolve further.
      >>has a duck bill for a mouth but the bill is LEATHERY
      So just big lips.

      have venomous spurs that while not deadly are almost overkill with being excruciatingly painful
      That's unique among mammals, sure.

      >>has the tail of a beaver, body of a chonky cat, fur of a river otter, and eyes of a fricking RABBIT of all things

      Convergent evolution. All its parts are 100% platypus parts

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >>>lays eggs instead of giving live birth
        >That's probably how all mammals started and it just didn't evolve further.
        Well yeah, mammal wombs just goes through the whole "egg" process but skips the calcium shell.

        I never really got why people put so much stock in the difference. They're almost entirely similar in their development stage and the only difference is that egglayers cut their connection with their babe early.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          well the shock just comes from the looks and functions of the animal really. how many other mammals look as wild as a platypus? for that matter how many other mammals have beaks or venom? they're fascinating oddities

          • 1 year ago
            Dream Island Obsessional Park

            Honestly after looking into it, it seems that venomous mammals are not super rare. You have bats, shrews, slow lorises, and moles that all have venom. Skunks, while not poisonous/venomous, have chemical defense.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              while true, I want you to factor in the reality that the majority of humanity lives in urban population centers. there they are mainly exposed to the same dozen or so animal species you would expect. domestic dogs and cats, rats, raccoons, roaches, etc. if you dont live in the country side or near a nature reserve, you've probably never seen a bat or even a cow in person. some of these animals (skunks, moles, voles, etc) are hard enough to spot in the wild anyways due to their solitary nature and the way they live to begin with. So if your only frame of reference for animals have been limited to things youve seen in zoos or the animals in your suburb, something like a platypus or a sea urchin seems pretty eild by comparison.

              • 1 year ago
                Dream Island Obsessional Park

                I understand, I mean there was a time where egglaying mammals baffled me, and I live in a rural ish Georgia(USA) area.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                no kidding, im from around that area too. its crazy some of the shit that used to live in the deep south. im still a little upset that ae used to have bears and cougars as far south as the everglades and then people just picked them off until they either disappeared or nearly went extinct. the south has alot of fun fauna man. even the invassive shit down here is nuts.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >if you dont live in the country side or near a nature reserve, you've probably never seen a bat

                I live in the 4th largest city in the USA and I see bats every evening, you're moronic.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Also
      >doesn't have a stomach

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      echidnas are almost odder for the simple sake of being derived terrestrial platypuses.
      >has the gate of a reptile
      >anteater like proboscis
      >claws like a wombat
      >looks and functions like a hedgehog
      evolution can be really entertaining sometimes. semirelated, but generally speaking I think marsupials are my favorite mammal family because of how bizarre and out of place they look compared to their placental counterparts. possums and raccoons are functionally the same creature but possums look like permian period stem-mammals from a billion years ago. then you just end up with some odd members of the family like frickin tree kangaroos or bilbies that just look like god tried drawing kangaroos or wallabys from memory while drunk.

    • 1 year ago
      Dream Island Obsessional Park

      >males have venomous spurs that while not deadly are almost overkill with being excruciatingly painful

      Only for mansized creatures and up, it can kill dogs and probably children. Also, slow lorises are a venous primate, so kinda weird as well.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        it makes me sad that slow lorises are so heavily targeted by the pet trade. they're fascinating and adorable little creatures that deserve to be left alone. for as cute as they are im always a bit sad whenever I see people keeping them as pets.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      The idea of poisonous/venomous mammals still strikes me the wrong way. Like, it just feels wrong. Birds and mammals have no bussiness having toxic pecks/bites. Then again I also don't think octopuses should be allowed to be venomous but here we are.

  34. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    ENTER

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous
      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        They can do that? Frick me

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          That was the only way they could survive after the Mesozoic

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        ayooo, dem plantz be walkin sheeesh

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/SuxycZj.gif

      they're just adapted to move through a dense medium

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Okay when it started "walking" like a spider, I freaked out.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      crinoid are so weird, I love them

  35. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    ahhh that abhorrent post

  36. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Bigfin Squid never cease to freak me the frick out. Terrifying and alien things deep in the ocean with incredibly long tentacles

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Makes you wonder how many of the sailor stories were actually true...

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        It's rare to see giant squid on the surface. Usually just when they are dead or dying. I can imagine sailors spotted one every now and then, or heard storys from someone else who had spotted one. Maybe trying to cling to the ship. And the guys had no idea such a species existed. And of course, sometimes ships were lost at sea, sunk somewhere never to be seen or heard from again. So come up with tales of a monster that could pull ships under

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/KztFhz5.jpg

      Makes you wonder how many of the sailor stories were actually true...

      Also Stygiomedusa Gigantea, the Giant Phantom Jellyfish. The mantle can have a diameter of 1.4m, length including tentacles up to 6m.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        This guy looks meaty

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          It's just a floating curtain, mate

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        This is what happens when you accidentally flush the whole bog roll down the shitter by accident

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous
  37. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Garloids. one of my buddies is "raising" one, if you can consider a plastic enclosure and tap water to be suitible living conditions

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Like with geoducks, I initially these are a hoax. But nope, nature is just moronic.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        That’s just an adult garloid mimicking a geoduck

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Tapwater
      Depends where you live, some states have clean tapwater.
      But in a lot of countries, ~~*they*~~ put products that are toxic to those poor frickers.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        in anglo countries they put fluorine in the tap water

  38. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Eels.

    >nobody knows how or where they reproduce
    >the pout (baby forms) were once considered their own species
    >they can use electricity to attack things

    Basically Pokemon IRL

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Wait, what kinds of eels can use electricity besides the electric eels(which aren't true eels, they're more closely related to catfish)?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Sargasso sea is where the baby american eels live, other Anguilla species must have similar places in their repsective countries of origin.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        We know where the babies live but we have never found eel eggs as far as I know.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >nobody knows how or where they reproduce
      Wait, hold on. Really?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >Wait, hold on. Really?
        No. That's just a specific folk myth about one species of eel (out of 800 species of eel).
        As the poster above said, those particular eels breed in the Sargasso Sea. No mystery there.
        Also, eels are just fish. Literally just fish. Amazing fish, a lot of them, but still just fish.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >nobody knows how or where they reproduce
          Wait, hold on. Really?

          Yes really. The European eel. That is found in rivers in Europe.
          Only recently it was proven that they reproduce in the sargasso sea.
          So until a few years ago we assumed they reproduced there but didn't know for sure

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Similar with other freshwater eels

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_longfin_eel#Life_cycle

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I hate you.
      >they have babies in sargasso sea and devolp reproductive organs on the way their
      >many larval stages have been considered different species at one point
      >The fishess that use electricity are not eels, just very large knifefish or Gymnotids.

      Wait, what kinds of eels can use electricity besides the electric eels(which aren't true eels, they're more closely related to catfish)?

      Only fish that can produce own electricity are Gymnotidae and Mormyridae. Neither are eels. Both super cool groups of fish tho.

      ENTER

      I love crinoids, sucks we cant keep them in captivity

      The one I dont get are brook lampreys, Your telling me those fricks dont eat as adults??? and they just look like lancets for 17 years??? How come I never see the babies even when I sift thorugh mud but I always see adults everywhere. I dont trust the scientists who reaserch them. Like how do they not have a digestive tract???
      >t. scientist

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >Like how do they not have a digestive tract???
        Do they have a trophosome instead? I mean they certainly would have their coelom, right?

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          well apparently they say they have a full digestive tract as ammocoets (or however you spell it). But as they develop intod adults it gets consumed.
          And their mouths are only used for respiration and suction.
          But the issue with that is as they supposedly live for 6 months without eating. While putting on a considerable amount of size and reproducing. So they have to get that energy from somewhere.
          Like I said. Dont trust the scientists. Also lampreys and hagfish frick up how we classify fish so I hate them even more

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            I wasn't aware of the time frames involved but I looked into it more. They eat detritus primarily as juveniles from what I saw and if that's true then they certainly have symbiotic bacteria. Trophosomes are primarily used by animals that have evolved a whole dependence on their symbiotic bacteria to get their energy needs and survive(Think tube worms in the deep sea in cold seeps and hydrothermal vents). Seeing as these lampreys are more sessile with their mouths only developing teeth once they're adults(and for the purpose of grasping) then I think it might be possible that they have something like a proto-trophosome. They might still be fermenting detritus inside of them and imparting various chemicals like hydrogen sulfide from the water and concentrating it into their remaining digestive tract for energy from their symbiotic gut fauna.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              uhhhh a lot of animals eat detritus that dont have crazy gut bacteria. Its a relitivley nutrient rich food item thats already broken down for you. I dont personally know of any fish that ferment their food or have symbiotic bacteria. I also personally beleive that lampreys are closer to lancets than actaul fish. But im not well versed on early fish taxonomy
              I think having a trophosome would probably be figured out. As well as salmon exhibit the same phenomenon where they gain size while not eating. Idk. I just thing that the people who research brook lampreys are missing something important.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >uhhhh a lot of animals eat detritus that dont have crazy gut bacteria.
                I don't mean anything crazy but they do have a symbiotic relationship. For example termites and land-dwelling isopods eat rotting wood and rely on the gut fauna that they have(and what's in the wood breaking it down) to do the majority of the digestion for them. Hydrogen sulfide fixating bacteria symbionts aren't something seemingly too difficult to evolve as many semi-sessile and sessile organisms have developed relationships with them. For example shipworms( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipworm ) and another trophosome haver the Paracatenula flatworms( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paracatenula ). There are other chemotrophs that could potentially be used besides sulfur oxidizing ones, like nitrogen oxidizing(nitrifying) bacteria(which might make more sense as the very ammonia that the lampreys would produce from breaking down their fat and muscle tissue would produce ammonia which can then sustain those bacteria, plus anything gotten from the water that passes them by). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrifying_bacteria

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Im just an ichthyologist my man. I aint ever heard of no fishes that got that bacteria. So i don't know it. Ill send ya some lampreys to cut open if ya want.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                I'd be up for it, but if you ever get ahold of some adult brook lampreys and want to experiment then you could measure their growth in differing water parameters. See if there's a positive correlation between hydrogen sulfide/ammonia levels and their body mass gain. If you have them in an enclosed body of water too then you could see the rate at which ammonia entering the water transforms into nitrate with or without them to see if they're affecting it at all.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >I aint ever heard of no fishes that got that bacteria.
                Wasn't there some anglerfish with a blind lightless lure, no teeth, and weird bacterial glands in its mouth? I figured that was what it was doing. Rhynchactis is the genus it seems.

                https://i.imgur.com/hg2FDDC.jpg

                I hate you.
                >they have babies in sargasso sea and devolp reproductive organs on the way their
                >many larval stages have been considered different species at one point
                >The fishess that use electricity are not eels, just very large knifefish or Gymnotids.
                [...]
                Only fish that can produce own electricity are Gymnotidae and Mormyridae. Neither are eels. Both super cool groups of fish tho.
                [...]
                I love crinoids, sucks we cant keep them in captivity

                The one I dont get are brook lampreys, Your telling me those fricks dont eat as adults??? and they just look like lancets for 17 years??? How come I never see the babies even when I sift thorugh mud but I always see adults everywhere. I dont trust the scientists who reaserch them. Like how do they not have a digestive tract???
                >t. scientist

                It sucks that there were once ceiling crinoids that hung upside down from driftwood like barnacles, but we lost them to Katie. Damn you, meteors!

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >And their mouths are only used for respiration and suction.
            Apparently they also grip stones them with them and build nests
            Quite unusual for a fish

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >How come I never see the babies
        I catch them occasionally when dragging a hand seine around.

  39. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    lancelets

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Lancelets are cool, I want them as pets.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >be 250mm lancelet
      >800mm gigalance steals my gf
      >mfw

  40. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Hell yes it's sacculina. I can barely believe a mass of tentacles is an actual animal instead of a fungus, and one that is an arthropod to boot (essentially, you already stated it literally perfectly with the comparison). Before I knew about sacculina I considered barnacles a mockery of the bilateral animal form, but sacculina put it into stark perspective -- at least barnacles have something that can be identified as a "mouth" and even an "outside", like a literal air-facing exterior.

    Tunicates is another good pick. They are chordates. What in the frick?

  41. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    fungi is fricking wierd and unnerving, like they grow super fast, some of them shoot spores in the air, they bave some wierd ass communication shit if i recall correctly, and they're not even plants, LIKE WHAT THE FRICK ARE YOU

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I can't fathom how communal organisms like the Portuguese man o' war evolved

      I was just watching a video on how some species of mushroom have spiked tendrils on their hyphae that they use to spear and eat nematodes

  42. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >sacculina
    Imagine if there were some equivalent parasite for humans? Like, it latches on to your dick and floods your system with female hormones until you turn into an over-sexed bimbo who lives only to copulate and spread the parasite? Wouldn't that be wild? Ha ha.
    Imagine.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      A parasite like that does exist, it's just memetic

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        What if the internet is just a digital, incorporeal equivalent of sacculina
        Ted wanted to destroy it and he almost cut his dick off first

  43. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not afraid of the ocean or sea creatures generally but these elicit fear in me.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      wtf is it?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Pyrosome I think

      • 1 year ago
        ALMSIVI

        Neo-penis

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Holy shit that's big. They seem pretty harmless though.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Considering that it's made of thousands of tiny seperate creatures I wouldn't touch it out of fear it'd start crawling up my ass.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/PizIeAb.jpg

      Holy shit that's big. They seem pretty harmless though.

      >be on fishing boat
      >fall into the ocean
      >see moving tube
      >get sorrounded
      What would you do?

  44. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Octopuses. Fricking crash-landed regressed/de-evolved Ayy Lmao looking freaks.

  45. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    parasitic worms

  46. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    whatever this is

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      That's a comb jelly(ctenophore), you can tell by that rainbowy shimmering along those lines. Those are from its cilia refracting light. The poor one in your video literally got eviscerated by the current.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >The poor one in your video literally got eviscerated by the current
        I hate when discussion of that vid devolves into some anon thinking it's a new species of squid that shot out ink to escape.
        It's just a poor dude that got yeeted by the water flow.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Most discussion of that video i've seen somehow ends up on people coming to the conclusion that the thing is either sapient or an alien for some reason

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            This. Posting that webm on /x/ is absolutely hysterical.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              its funny seeing them trying to find meaning in the cilia movement thats just reflecting light

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        is there any explanation for the shape shifting that took place?
        i dont find the light show nearly as strange as the shape shifting.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          They're basically like a gelatinous bag with some lobes. It was probably in some weird feeding posture before and then the current itself either startled it to look more like the webm I posted before or just pushed it into its original shape. Comb jellies also come in a variety of forms but iirc the most common form is basically a ball with two tendrils that go off in either direction. They don't have nematocysts(stinging cells) and instead the tentacles are just sticky. They'll remain idle in the water column and then retract their tentacles back in order to consume whatever was stuck to them.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            I remember seeing a swarm of these guys at the beach once, but at the time I thought they were just jellyfish

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              They usually do get called jellyfish and they're not all non-venomous either. Beroids, like the one in that post you replied to, have something akin to "teeth" and a digestive "saliva" that they use to help kill and digest their prey. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beroidae
              >"The three-toothed tip of the macrocilia is stiff enough for it to rip the outer wall of larger prey such as other ctenophores; at the same time, proteolytic enzymes penetrate into the resulting wounds, rapidly incapacitating the victim.[4][5]"
              It's completely harmless to us at least but still cool since ctenophores and cnidarians are some of the earliest branches of the animal family tree.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Can you feel it if they "bite" you? Does it hurt?

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Never been bit by one but your skin should be more than thick enough to be fine. Mucus membranes like your gums, eyes, etc. would be less safe though.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Whats happening here?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous
  47. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    If we are speaking about mammals is there anything weirder than whales being nested within artiodactyls? Manatees, elephants and hyraxes being the closest relatives of each others comes to mind but aside from that I'm not sure.

  48. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe not exactly "objectively wierdest", but it always fascinated me that the second closest thing nature has to human civilization are ants. Some of these guys invented/discovered agriculture and cities hundreds of millions of years before humans came into picture.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Rather an exaggeration. Ants appeared around a hundred million years ago. Agriculture didn't appear until the eocene, 50 mio years ago.
      Also termites did all of it earlier.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      triggers my autism
      ant "agriculture" is an evolved symbiotic relationships
      they don't have "cities", they have nests where everyone is related to each other (and female)

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >ant "agriculture" is an evolved symbiotic relationships
        What do you think wheat or rice is? Most of the crops we grow can't survive in that form in nature and quickly evolve to being less edible. Citrus plants quickly become overly bitter and sour, pigs quickly become more like boars, dogs more like wolves, etc.. We're also more evolved to care for animals and we develop oxytocin based relationships with them.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >What do you think wheat or rice is?
          Do you see human babies spontaneously planting rice fields without being taught anything? Domestic crops are technology we created very recently. We never evolved to plant crops.
          >We're also more evolved to care for animals
          Than what?
          How could you experimentally show that humans have evolved to like dogs?

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            It’s not that we evolved to like dogs. Dogs evolved to be liked by empathetic people who also like each other, and they stayed because having dogs increases evolutionary fitness.

            A dog is a tame wolf that does not attack people.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              >It’s not that we evolved to like dogs.
              Then it's not a "symbiotic relationship".
              If there are actually academics who use that term to describe domestication I'd be curious to see it.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah its commensalism I never said it was anything

                It’s becoming a symbiotic relationship because so many humans are now basically blind and if society collapses they will actually need dogs to find food or see shit approaching, and so many dogs are moronic they will need humans to survive at all.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                *mutualism
                It’s late

                Oh wait isn’t mutualism a form of symbiosis

                Lol!

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Some people say pets are parasites. But this is because they don’t understand what the pet actually does or how (in fact they are antisocial and low empathy and never will). The pet replaces them. The obligatory friend who is just a friend and does very little, but highly social people need that no strings attached relationship to stay sane and evolving to lack the need for one at all would make them worse in other ways. Pets are a symbiote that allows us to remain highly social and replace potentially dangerous and resource intensive non-productive humans with something exponentially safer and cheaper. Objectively less unneeded human contact lessens your risk of being killed or stolen from. All of your human friends should be productive enough to make up for that risk, but that creates stressful obligations and friendships that can never be relied on. The useless friend is the best one to confide in and rely on just to fulfill your instincts.

                They are an inevitable and essential part of an efficient high trust society but they must be that. Friends, fwbs. Not children. Or they stop being a symbiote. It’s like your gut flora moving to your body cavity - nope!

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >fwbs

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                I though this thread was dead
                How the frick did we get here?

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >"Uhhm, actually, sweaty, it's not symbiotic unless it's an innately developed trait that babies have. Also give me some sources for humans liking dogs or that humans care for animals more than other animals."
            Brainlet.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              You misinterpreted both claims. The first wasn't about babies in particular, just innate behavior. The second was about innate behavior too, not denying that people have pets.

              *mutualism
              It’s late

              Oh wait isn’t mutualism a form of symbiosis

              Lol!

              I'm surprised by how many people are using "symbiosis" in your sense. Looks like you were right about terminology. But it seems sloppy to me to use the term when the evolutionary relationship is one-sided.

              I'm curious, do you also think that humans are "eusocial"?

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                It’s far from one sided and humans are only eusocial if we are both multicultural and extremely, extremely racist

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >We never evolved to plant crops.
            Uhhh but we did, stupid. Ahhh that old hominid exceptionalism. Muh culture.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >ant "agriculture" is an evolved symbiotic relationships
        Black person that's exactly what agriculture is. Hell, most agricultural life has evolved so far from their wild counterparts they would't survive a week in the wild.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        that's because eusociality is the highest step in social evolution. we just have yet to reach it

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >that's because eusociality is the highest step in social evolution. we just have yet to reach it
          Debatable. While humans have only very limited biological reproductive specialisation (menopause), our behaviour is highly eusocial.
          Laying down your life to the benefit of others in your community is a fundamentally eusocial behaviour. The poppy fields of flanders are only possible if your species, or society, values supporting the reproductive success of the collective over the reproductive success of the individual. Human willingness to go to war and die for the benefit of the collective is a fundamentally eusocial behaviour.
          And the reason eusocial species are as successful as they are isn't simply their mode of reproduction. It's the behavioural changes this mode of reproduction enables. If these same behavioural changes are possible without changing the mode of reproduction, the impact on the ecosystem is still the same.
          And that's before we get into humans not having a high degree of biologically sourced reproductive specialisation, but very much having a high degree of social reproductive specialisation. Wealth used to be an important determinant in whether a human could reproduce or not. A large percentage of humans still worked for their respective polities, but never got to breed, simply by way of social enforcement. Crucially, their work still benefitted the polity they lived in, which cannot be said for a jaguar that dies alone and without having fathered cubs. Individuals without reproductive success still added to the reproductive success of the collective.
          THAT is the fundamentally difference between eusociality and not-eusociality.
          And interestingly enough, there are species of wasps that function the same. Each worker CAN lay eggs from which new wasps would hatch, but social enforcement of dominance hierarchies means that only the queen (or sometimes several queens) actually does so.
          Humans are on that level. Primitively eusocial.

  49. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen a lot of weird shit posted here but I still can't wrap my head around siphonophores.
    Dendrogasters? Sure.
    Prototaxites? Why not.
    Siphonophores? Nope, can't do it.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Dendrogasters

      Oh shit that's their name? I remember seeing this picture a while back but I couldn't remember the name so I made this thread starting with sacculina, I feel like this is even stranger and there seems to be less information on them, the marinespecies website only has 35 species in the genus. Siphonophores are beautiful in an alien sort of way.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      You know how mitochondria are basically their own animal? That’s every part of a siphonophores body, but their cells are more independent.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Elaborate?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        I see. I think I actually get it now.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >mitochondria
        The mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell, how can their be their own cell? What do they do with their energy?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      There is nothing weird about this. It is extremely straight-forward to imagine them coming into being. I look at these creatures and say "Yes."

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Biblically accurate jellyfish

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Is this AI generated?

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          No, generated by Ernst Häckel.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous
        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          · (Racial Slur) - 1,357

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Made me chuckle. God bless you.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous
          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            The man truly loved his cat. What a nice fellow.

            • 1 year ago
              Dream Island Obsessional Park

              Yes, it sure was a cute, furry, 4 legged NIGGE...

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Someone explain to me like a moron why siphonophores are made up of individual organisms and how that's different from other animals with a number of organs. It's not like the individual parts of a man-o-war could survive by themselves and all the different organisms grow from the same single egg, how is that so different from a human embryo ultimately spawning all the different organs?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        The individual parts of a man-o-war each have their own genetic code

        Blanking on the name but there's a barnacle-like animal that once was a fully mobile species resembling a shrimp that evolved over millions of years to be fully sedentary. If you chop the barnacle-like creature in half you can see the atrophied legs, head, torso, etc of a shrimp half melted and surrounded by mollusk-like meat.
        That ring a bell to anyone?

        >barnacle-like
        Barnacles
        IIRC tunicates are similar but less grotesque

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >their own genetic code
          But they still all come from a single egg right? Fricking weird man.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          man-o-wars genuinely unsettle me. there's something undescribably hellish and kind of sad about being a living mass of multiple entities with the capacity to sting the shit out of schools of fish all at once. it would be like fusing together every Wauf user into one being and designing that new being's body into a metal gear made of living flesh

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            You're on Wauf, so you probably already know this, but 90% of the cells in your body are symbiotic bacteria and archaea, and your proper cells contain a liquid network of transiently fusing and differentiating mitochondria that has its own genome because it originated as other cells that your cells engulfed
            So don't judge

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        siphonophores are like if you counted a meieval lord's fiefs as an organism. that means cows, chickens, dogs, etc are included.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        We develop with all the organs pre-set and then get bigger. Siphonophores generate new zooids over and over - and each zooid, UNLIKE an organ, is its own little thing that exists separately and is capable of fugging and making another zooid. Some of them propel the siphonophore, others catch food, others digest, but they all have a unique genetic code. It'd be like if your hand fricked your other hand to generate a third hand independent of what you wanted it to do, and then remove your brain from the equation, and apply that to every function of your body - and it's all connected to a common feeding tube for shared nutrients.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Imagine if all your organs could frick off if they got bored, and you could just mix and match organs with another person
          Don't have to worry about organ rejection because they're not "keyed" for your specific body. Their have their own unique DNA, immune system, etc that coexists with yours. Everything is handled locally by the organ itself and if it dies it gets replaced by another.
          That's basically the principle.

          Thats shounds cool as frick
          But I dont get how are they are of "bigger" organism rather than just clump of beings working together

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Cos at the end of the day they perform different functions as a collective than they do individually
            Coral for example has different polyps. They can all live independently, but together they have a symbiotic relationship that enables very different functions
            We call them species because all the different kinds of polyps will only form these relationships with a set kind of similar polyps
            Imagine if dogs (the zooids, also called polyps) can merge together and contribute their specialisations towards a superdog (the siphonophore). You got collies in their providing herding instincts, pitbulls for killing, chihuahuas for trembling and being yappy little c**ts. They can each live individually however together they've made something that can do everything and share its resources
            However this will only happen with different dog breeds. You can't chuck a cat into the superdog; it'll be rejected by the superdog because it's not a dog
            The superdog is then a different organism to the dog, the dogs are different to a cat, and a superdog is a different organism to a supercat.
            Or you could imagine that they've instinctively built biological cities with each professional role filled by the individual organism's natural physical specialisation. Either way that's basically how it works

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              Lets say we have four superdogs composed of three dogs each one
              >collie colllie pitbull
              >collie colllie pitbull
              >collie colllie pitbull
              >chihuahua chihuahua chihuahua
              Will the four of them be different superdog species?
              What would happen if (collie colllie pitbull) exchange dogs and they result in
              (collie pitbull pitbull) and (collie colllie collie)?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Imagine if all your organs could frick off if they got bored, and you could just mix and match organs with another person
        Don't have to worry about organ rejection because they're not "keyed" for your specific body. Their have their own unique DNA, immune system, etc that coexists with yours. Everything is handled locally by the organ itself and if it dies it gets replaced by another.
        That's basically the principle.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      aren't they just poorly defined jellyfish?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Which diverged first, sponges or comb jellies?

  50. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Bats are very strange creatures. They’re more related to primates than they are rodents or squirrels. Strange hand like bone structure. Only mammals with the ability to fly (not just glide). Some bats are big and cute, others are small and nightmarish.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >They’re more related to primates than they are rodents or squirrels.
      Wrong, it's primates that are related to rodents, bats are related to carnivorans and ungulates. That probably makes them weirder.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >bats related to ungulates
        The actual frick

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          It's not like bats arose from a ungulate ancestor or viceversa, their last common ancestor was was some shrew looking thing and both branches are highly derived.

    • 1 year ago
      Dream Island Obsessional Park

      I agree, flying mammals is just a weird concept for me some reason.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        To me Cetaceans are weirder
        You have water mammals who are bigger than any fish
        Also Dolphins, who have primate level intelligence but were cucked out of tools because they have fins

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >Also Dolphins, who have primate level intelligence but were cucked out of tools
          It's time to genetically engineer dolphins to have hands and arms instead of pectoral fins. They can have the oceans while we get the land.

          • 1 year ago
            Dream Island Obsessional Park

            Chinese knockoff mermaid.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              The Chinese would love them. They could be pressed into underwater sweatshops. China's already been getting more underwater real estate with all of those artificial islands increasing their EEZ.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Then how are they going to swim, dummy

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              They've still got their tail fin, of course. Sirens don't seem to have any issue with this setup.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Let's not go down that rabbit hole

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              I feel like the book would've been okay if the art wasn't so abhorrently disgusting. All Tomorrows worked fine, after all.

              • 1 year ago
                Dream Island Obsessional Park

                I think it was more so what the humans turned into in the latter that made it better, as All Tomorrows had creatures that look gross.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                I actually really like the art because of how bizarre it looks
                My favorite creatures were definitely the hivers

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              I see no issue here.

              i wonder if it could be possible for them to come back on land one day...
              I think they have vestigial leg bones or something?

              They potentially could, if all of the niches opened up. They already breath air so it'd just be about supporting themselves on land and moving around. I remember there was a spec evo thing before that had envisioned cetaceans returning to land being tripodal(their tailfin being the hind leg and their pectoral fins becoming their front limbs).

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              Wheres is this from?

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            i wonder if it could be possible for them to come back on land one day...
            I think they have vestigial leg bones or something?

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Dolphins with hands would immediately become the slave race of Orcas.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              We should give Orcas hands too then. Gotta make their job easier.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Just give them collars with robot arms

        • 1 year ago
          Dream Island Obsessional Park

          They are right up with bats, like noses on top of their heads and brushes in the mouths of some whales that filterfeed on prey that is very small.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          They might not have hands to grab stuff but they have prehensile dicks... well, half of them do

  51. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I don’t think barnacles are weird. They are just crabs that can’t walk and live off filter feeding. Wish they could be kept in aquariums, but they starve to death, always.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >they starve to death, always.
      nah, I've seen them survive on live rock for years. We keep lots of filter feeders including sponges, corals, tube worms, some scallops and anemones

      I think the bigger problem is most large barnacles are cold water species and almost nobody keeps cold water with plankton and etc.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >We keep lots of filter feeders including sponges, corals, tube worms, some scallops and anemones

        That sounds awesome, I have had making a cool saltwater tank on my bucket list for a while, I especially like scallops, how is taking care of those? What other animals do you have? Do you have any cool crabs or seastars?

  52. 1 year ago
    Bitch

    Snails

  53. 1 year ago
    Sage

    You seriously think this is more close to flatworms?
    Dude please don't tell me you're that stupid.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      fricking idiot lmao

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      The sacculina is the fleshy blob attached to the crab, not the crab itself

  54. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    My ancestor 🙂

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >I bet if I go on land the israelites will get btfo’d one day
      >frick it lets gooo

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Anon, that's also the ancestor of israelites.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Hey that's the butthole that decided to climb out of the water and now I have to work and pay taxes

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Why'd he do it lads?

  55. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    This is a catfish, from the Glanapteryginae family.

  56. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Myxoxoans.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Lots of land animals have returned to the water.
      Many have lost their limbs, teeth, and other organs which took a long time to evolve.
      Some have moved from endothermy back to ectothermy.
      As far as I'm aware, these little freaks are the only ones who have given up on being multicellular and returned to a protozoan style existence.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >reject modernity
        >return to blob
        Unlce Ted was right about everything......VGH!!!

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Some species parasitize shrews and frogs
      So technically the only Cnidarians on land

  57. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Henneguya zschokkei

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Looks like an gray alien mixed with a sperm cell, I always forget cnidarians include anemones and coral and not just jelly fish

      This pyura tunicate is crazy, it freaks me out how tunicates are vertebrates.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >it freaks me out how tunicates are vertebrates.
        Chordates, not vertebrates, but yeah. It's fricking unbelievable that some cnidarian-like blob-thing is closer to us than squid, which have eyes, brains, hearts, skeletons, etc.
        My candidate is transmissible cancers. They are essentially animals (including humans) which have made an evolutionary leap into a contagious disease in one 'generation'. Like, there's your dog, and its ancestors were dogs. Then there's a tumour growing on your dog's dick, and the tumour's ancestors were also dogs.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >cancer is a life form
          i never thought about that thats fricking freaky

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >cancer is a life form
            More like
            >a contagious human cancer is the same species as you

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              >>a contagious human cancer is the same species as you
              But it's not.
              It's a new species that split off humans.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                not sure.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              >>a contagious human cancer is the same species as you
              But it's not.
              It's a new species that split off humans.

              >it freaks me out how tunicates are vertebrates.
              Chordates, not vertebrates, but yeah. It's fricking unbelievable that some cnidarian-like blob-thing is closer to us than squid, which have eyes, brains, hearts, skeletons, etc.
              My candidate is transmissible cancers. They are essentially animals (including humans) which have made an evolutionary leap into a contagious disease in one 'generation'. Like, there's your dog, and its ancestors were dogs. Then there's a tumour growing on your dog's dick, and the tumour's ancestors were also dogs.

              Isnt it a subspecies from the host being?
              Wouldnt every cell division from within cross transmission be another subespecies?
              Wouldnt being a circular transmission kill every possibility to retrieve patient cero identity?

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >cancer is a life form
          i never thought about that thats fricking freaky

          Gee I sure hope I won't evolve into a parasitic lifeform

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Speak for yourself.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              >photos taken moments before disaster

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >Gee I sure hope I won't evolve into a parasitic lifeform
            If you're a leftist it's already too late.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              frick off to /misc/ gay

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            Don't worry, men can't become women

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >cancer is a life form
          i never thought about that thats fricking freaky

          The future is HeLa.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            of course it had to be a niggress
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henrietta_Lacks

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >Chordates, not vertebrates

          Oh ok, I think I got confused with all them having a notochord as all them having a spinal column

          You seriously think this is more close to flatworms?
          Dude please don't tell me you're that stupid.

          fricking idiot lmao

          Well, it superficially seems close to flatworms. It's a parasitic white blobish creature. If I showed you the picture of the sacculina next to a crab or this liver fluke which one would you assume it's closer too? I understand It looks more traditionally arthropod in its larval stages.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >cancer is a life form
          i never thought about that thats fricking freaky

          >One theory explaining the highly unsual habit of H. zschokkei and its fellow myxosporeans invokes the cancers of cnidarians. On this explanation, animals such as H. zschokkei were originally cancerous growths in free-swimming jellyfish that escaped their parent organism and thereafter became a separate species parasitizing other animals. Such an origin is referred to as a SCANDAL (Speciated by CANcer Development in AnimaLs).[10]

          Ah, the old HeLa/transmissible dog cancer dynamic strikes again. This reminds me how any animal, technically, just depends on its germ line. It sounds trivial, but it becomes more fascinating the more think about it: we ultimately only depend on the genetic code that belongs to the sperm/egg. Meaning if some cosmic ray strikes you gonads, all your descendants will have that change (simplified). If the entire rest of the body receives a trillion cosmic rays, your progeny will not care and not be affected. You -- the person that is you -- literally just sources from ball cells.
          As said, it sounds trivial, but also strange.

          That kind of stuff is interesting (and scary) as frick.
          I remember reading about a case where a guy got tapeworms or some other parasitic worm in him, but his immune system was so weak that the worm larvae somehow managed to mutate into tumors instead of growing like a normal tapeworm would, or something along those lines

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            damn that's actually pretty cool

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            The tapeworm had cancer and because he had no immune system, he got his tapeworm's cancer.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >This pyura tunicate is crazy, it freaks me out how tunicates are vertebrates.
        They aren't really tho, minor technicalities don't count.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      is that ayy sperm?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        that's MY sperm, my bad, I can't help myself when I get horny

        They can do that? Frick me

        omw, have the lube ready

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >doesn't breathe or use oxygen for energy
      >still unknown how it produces energy
      WHAT THE FRICK IS THIS SHIT

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >electromagnetism schizo time

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >salmon parasite
        Maybe it just takes salmon energy raw and that's why it doesn't need mitochondrias

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >One theory explaining the highly unsual habit of H. zschokkei and its fellow myxosporeans invokes the cancers of cnidarians. On this explanation, animals such as H. zschokkei were originally cancerous growths in free-swimming jellyfish that escaped their parent organism and thereafter became a separate species parasitizing other animals. Such an origin is referred to as a SCANDAL (Speciated by CANcer Development in AnimaLs).[10]

      Ah, the old HeLa/transmissible dog cancer dynamic strikes again. This reminds me how any animal, technically, just depends on its germ line. It sounds trivial, but it becomes more fascinating the more think about it: we ultimately only depend on the genetic code that belongs to the sperm/egg. Meaning if some cosmic ray strikes you gonads, all your descendants will have that change (simplified). If the entire rest of the body receives a trillion cosmic rays, your progeny will not care and not be affected. You -- the person that is you -- literally just sources from ball cells.
      As said, it sounds trivial, but also strange.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/T11Mp5k.jpg

      Looks like an gray alien mixed with a sperm cell, I always forget cnidarians include anemones and coral and not just jelly fish

      This pyura tunicate is crazy, it freaks me out how tunicates are vertebrates.

      >doesn't breathe or use oxygen for energy
      >still unknown how it produces energy
      WHAT THE FRICK IS THIS SHIT

      this. cnidarians are the emanations of the divine. life shot past primordial unicellate building blocks into degenerate chordate status worshippers-reflections of the blind god / serpent bearing samael / IAO dabaoth / rotten kundalini at their core / chord
      cnidarian = kadmon aryan = primordial most high untouched by death
      no accident that cnidarians evolved biological immortality no accident they are infinitely flexible in terms of evolution and can use hundreds of widely disparate life strategies, this is a metaphysical truth reflected in their flesh
      no accident they dont need mitochondria to live, mito = DA MATE = demeter = rhea = treacherous titaness = ashera = EVE, chondria = CHRONOS = kronos = saturn = satan = demiurgic thoughtform ia = IAO = yahweh sabaoth = ialdabaoth = demiurgic dreamer but cnidarians are untouched by entropy or the Fall of the world
      no accident they have radial symmetry (axis mundi, mandala, seal of solomon the king) while chordates (sons of kronos) have bilateral demiurgic / dualistic / sefirotic false forms, as above so below, the fall reflected in the fallen architecture of the body, flawed temple,

      Biblically accurate jellyfish

      no accident. look up ofanim

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >schizo thinks the most holy life is a wiggly plant
        Kek

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >kadmon aryan
        Your brain is terminally rotted by israeli mysticism, please end yourself

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Thx Dr Bronner

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          HHHHAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAA.
          I too have read the schizo soap bottle.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous
        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Lmao I'm gonna see schizoposting in a whole new light now

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Sanest /x/ poster

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Dont know wether youre trolling or mental

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *