What do you feed your dog?

I have an incredibly picky dog and kibble and wet dog food are incredibly expensive to waste when he doesn’t eat it. He literally would leave his food out all day and maybe nibble 1/3 of it late at night when his hunger got the best of him. When I added cheese, meat or wet food to his kibble, he would just eat that off the top and leave the dog kibble. Since he’s become really skinny the past 4 or 5 months since becoming so picky, I decided to just cook him some food on the stovetop. Here’s what I’ve been making:

Lean ground beef - boiled in water and all fat drained, then rinsed again
Carrots and sweet potato - chopped small and boiled with the ground beef
Brown rice
Hardboiled eggs

What do you think? Any missing nutrients? Should I keep the gross fat oil with the ground beef and brown it in a skillet with cooking oil? Anyone have a guide to ratios of meat to veggies, or how to gauge how much to feed?

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  1. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is this a sudden change? Did he not used to be picky and then suddenly became picky? I'd take a dog like that to the vet and get bloods taken. There could be something seriously wrong.

    I used to have a picky dog. He'd starve himself for up to 5 days in a row if he didn't like what I put in front of him. I tried all sorts of toppers, mixing them thoroughly into his food, everything from cheese to yoghurt to canned sardines in oil to wet dog food. Anyway, he had EPI and wasn't digesting his food properly, so it was giving him stomach ache whenever he ate. I got him on the right meds, and he came right.

    If your dog has always been fussy, it's possible he's just bored of his food. Try taking it up after ten minutes, and offering it maybe 2 - 3 times throughout the day, not leaving it down.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      The breeder sent him home with an adult kibble and a vitamin supplement, which I kept him on until he was about 5 months old. He never really ate it hungrily, and wouldn't always finish it. I changed him to Purina Pro Plan puppy kibble for the next 6 months, which he ate ravenously for a while, but slowly got to the point of not finishing, like he was sick of it. When I switched at 12 months to a mixture of Pro Plan adult kibble and puppy kibble, he freaked. He didn't like the big kibbles mixed in with the puppy kibble, even though it was (allegedly) the same flavor from the same brand. At that point, I started mixing in various wet foods, cheese and sometimes chicken, which he would eat, but not always finishing the kibble. For breakfast, he would often refuse, and then eat it for dinner after exercise. I also transitioned to a different dry food, Blue Buffalo, for a while, which he ate for just long enough to get his stomach used to it, but decided he didn't like it after that point. I've gotten him through a few bags of Pro Plan since then, but typically, he wastes a lot of it, and when I mix wet food, he eats it, but not when I serve it - rather, he eats it 4-5 hours later, when the wet food is potentially going bad. And the people who say "just pick the food up and give it to him later" don't seem to understand you can't just set food aside when it's mixed with wet food. That stuff goes bad if you leave it out too long.

      Incidentally, my parents have a dog of the same breed, and the experience feeding him is virtually a mirror image. They don't always have an appetite in the morning, and if you don't adulterate their kibble with real food additives, they don't care for it.

  2. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    my coom, my male milk

  3. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Your dog isn't picky, it's testing you and you're failing.

  4. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >giving any kind of cooked/prepared foods or dry kibble to your carnivorous pet
    look into barfing

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      He threw up occasionally when eating kibble or wet dog food, but he would have diarrhea randomly. He has yet to throw up or have loose shit in the week or so he's been on cooked food.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        BARF

        Biologically Appropriate Raw Food Diet.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          I would barf too if I ate that, but thanks for clarifying. I had an aunt who fed her dogs raw food for a pretty long time, and it didn't always go down very easily. I have a call scheduled with my vet to get some feedback and direction later today.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            I did some serious research on raw food diets, and one of the most important things I learned from the anti-raw food stuff was the extreme importance of keeping everything super super clean.

            The studies found that the dogs poop had much higher levels of pathogenic bacteria with a raw food diet. Salmonella was one of the major elevated bacteria. Dog slobber may also pose an elevated risk with a raw food diet.

            Quality and freshness of meat is also very important. If you have access to a a cattle rancher that will sell you scraps that is a great way to get inexpensive meat. I am looking into something similar and I can get high quality grass fed beef scrap blend for around 3-4 dollars per pound. He is even willing to make a blend for me, so I can give him any additives like chlorella, quinoa, bone meal, etc that I want within the mix.

  5. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >cooking your dog a meal
    Lmao

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >doing work
      >being responsible
      Sheeeiiiit aint no 1 got time fo dat imma orda dat dawg some doggy kfc and save some money and time for anudda eighth

  6. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    youre doing good by your dog cpoking for him off the stove but rinsing his meat is fricking moronic it rinses out all the wayer soluble vitamins and the fat coming off takes the fat solubles with it, just add some water and let it cook down and fry

  7. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Here is this week's dog food. Half will go into a big container in the fridge and the other half in the freezer for the second half of the week. I'm doing 2 pounds ground beef, 1 pound brown rice and 1 pound sweet potato, which is shredded to increase surface area because I was seeing little bits of veggies in his poop that didn't digest fully. I'll add a hardboiled egg per meal, and a serving of a multivitamin once per day. Still open to suggestions, and will be consulting with a couple vets on Monday to make sure it's as nutritionally complete as possible.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      This makes about 3 quarts of food, or 12 cups, so only about 4 days of food for my dog, I think.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      You need to add liver and other excretory organ meats. Spleen is a good one to do.

      Brown rice is shit also.

  8. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    That looks better than the shit I eat. If your dog can't appreciate it then trade it in for one that isn't a spoiled princess.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      He loves it. See:

      https://i.imgur.com/GSrU3mg.jpg

      He's a wheaten.

      .

      I'm just working on making it more nutritious. Seems I'm missing calcium, omega 3 fatty acids, and maybe some other random vitamins and minerals.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        you could probably buy liver for minerals and cheap sardines (lower mercury content than tuna) for omega-3

  9. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    dogs need fat, no need to drain the fat! especially if he is already thin.
    have you tried blending everything ?
    try to cover kibble or other food in jogurt, cream cheese, stock, oil, thuna water, raw egg yolk or else.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >dogs need fat, no need to drain the fat!
      Yeah, but the fat that comes off ground beef isn't a normal amount of fat. I think this is because meat packers add something called "pink slime" to ground beef, which is ground up bits of cow that can't be sold otherwise.

  10. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    OP here.

    Doing a little research, and finding some info on ratios.
    1/2 meat, 1/4 veggies, 1/4 rice seems to be what actual vets are saying, despite some recipes online suggesting much more veggies and rice than that.

    Calcium supplements, plus omega-3 fatty acid and multivitamin supplements are also pretty commonly recommended. Grinding up egg shells is also an option for calcium. Just meat, veggies, rice and eggs probably doesn't have a complete enough nutrition profile.

    Still not sure if frying ground beef in oil is really the best, but I guess as long as you pour off the excess fat that comes out, it should be good. Or switching to ground turkey would solve the grease issue. When you fry ground beef in a skillet, there is just so much grease that comes out of it.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Don't feed your dog cooked things (except for eggs, but they are also fine raw) and try to avoid things like beef and chicken unless it's super wanky free range organic bullshit. Dogs obviously can't process the hormones and other crap in there, and it presents itself as allergies.
      Give it some raw venison, lamb, turkey, salmon & raw vegetables like pumpkin, carrot, broccoli, green beans/peas etc. with a soft boiled egg on top.
      While potato isn't necessarily bad for dogs, it's not great as it's essentially just filler and dogs have a hard time breaking down carbs and it gets converted into sugars. Avoid Kibble at all costs.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Forgot to add avoid rice & pasta for the same reasons as potatoes. Your dog shouldn't need calcium or a multivitamin if you're feeding it raw vegetables and providing it with raw bones (things like duck necks/wings while it's young). Omega 3 is pretty common, but they can also get that from things like whole sardines or the salmon I mentioned above.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Pasta is very good for working dogs Black person. I own racing greyhounds and during racing season they get cooked pasta along with their raw meat for a definite reason.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Do rice and rolled oats. Oats are quite good for dogs.

      There's a good calculator online, but I can't remember what the website is.

      Here's a formulation that covers all nutrients(if I remember correctly) for an aafco approved diet for an adult dog.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oats aren't good for dogs. Grains aren't part of their natural diet, and again it gets processed into sugars, which they can't digest.

        Dogs can eat a little bit of powdered garlic or onion just fine.
        [...]
        Cook sweet potatoes are good and are commonly used in dog food.
        [...]
        >Family
        Speaking of family. You can just cook in bulk for the whole family (including the dog.) I myself like to do that when I have the luxury of being home. Save times and money. The other members don't have to cook now and can do your chores for you in exchange.
        [...]
        Cheese or evaporated milk would help with the calcium and other nutrients, proteins, and fat. If you want a low fat meat, it doesn't get much lower than rabbit meat.

        A lot of dogs are lactose intolerant, cheese and yoghurt are alright if they aren't, but only in small doses.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Definitely wrong about oats. I'm talking half cup per day amounts. Not as a main source of calories.

          Garlic is also extremely good for dogs.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            >half cup per day
            Not him, but this seems like a lot for a 30-40 pound dog.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              My dog is 85lbs, but I have been giving him the same amount of oats since he was 40lbs. Remember a quarter cup is only 4 tbs(twice a day), and I'm talking dry oats. Not cooked.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            Nah man, I train working dogs for the gubberment, dog nutrition is part of what I do. I bet your dog has either gut or skin issues.
            Garlic is completely fine & is a natural dewormer. Onion is a no-go.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              I'm going to amend this before someone spergs put about the word 'completely' - I mean it's not an 'insta-kill', obviously don't let your dog munch on whole bulbs.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Neither actually. I got the advice from my breeder who raises award winning show dogs. The hilarious thing is oats are good for both skin and gut.

              Garlic is good for dogs, but it's dose dependant like you said.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                What's actually hilarious is that every vet and nutritionist I know says to never feed dogs raw oats as they are virtually indigestible & if you really want to get into it look into the effects of glyphosate - for both you & your pup. But you do you man, it's your dog.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                Cooked oats, duh.
                Organic, duh.

                Oats have some of the highest levels of pesticides of any food crop, so it's blatantly obvious to only get organic oats.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Neither actually. I got the advice from my breeder who raises award winning show dogs. The hilarious thing is oats are good for both skin and gut.

              Garlic is good for dogs, but it's dose dependant like you said.

              I'm a dog and you're all bullshit. Woof. Give me meat instead of oats, I'm not a cow

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                YOU VILL EAT ZE OATS.
                AND
                YOU VILL BE HAPPY.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          For an 85lb dog.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Found it!

      https://www.dogfoodcalc.com/calc#/

  11. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can give garlic to your dog every day as long as it's only a little

  12. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >sweet potato
    can't this kill them?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/can-dogs-eat-sweet-potatoes/

  13. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    this homie cooking for a dog

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      you expect everything on earth to pay for kfc moron? cookings cheaper. supplement it by letting them eat animals.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >cookings cheaper.
        so is your time. when you have a family (well, i dont know about you specifically) to also worry about, spending 30-60 minutes on a meal for the dog everyday suddenly becomes a lot less important. you don't have to feed your dog the cheapest ol' roy goyslop, but cooking for them every day is also too much in the other direction

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          >cooking for them every day
          Have you never heard of meal-prepping? Especially something simple like ground beef and vegetables, all you need to do is spend about an hour on Sunday to prep an entire week's worth of food, freeze half of it, and keep the other half in a large container in the fridge.

  14. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I mix their dry food with some water because I worry about them not drinking enough.
    For dinner they get dry food mixed with water and a fresh raw egg.

  15. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Don't leave food out for the dog, only give it when he asks for it

  16. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Have you tried soaking the kibble?
    That's what my mom does with her dog.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah seconding this, a lot of the time kibble needs some water content, but i will say that sometimes my moms dog gets real picky about eating the dog food and he wont eat it in the bowl sometimes, he will take it out first then eat it off the rug instead.
      you could also trick your dog, by training him and giving bits of kibble as rewards each time you get him to do a trick

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Don't leave food out for the dog, only give it when he asks for it

        Have you tried soaking the kibble?
        That's what my mom does with her dog.

        This, did you ask your vet to check him over? He might have something as simple as a toothache and the hard kibble hurts to eat
        [...]
        I bet you're just a b***h magnet, aren't ya little guy?

        Not sure why people keep asking the same questions that I've answered multiple times already. I'm really just looking for recipes for homemade dog food.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          >make yourself slow-cooked meals with meat, veggies, rice or pasta
          >share with the dog
          >????
          >profit!

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            The problem is that dogs can’t eat onions or garlic, and the amount of spices that humans like will turn their stomachs.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Then limit your use of onions and garlic, and replace spices with herbs. If you really need to eat onions and garlic everyday you can incorporate that in other meals or preparations your dog won't touch (aïoli, tsaziki, giacamole, etc.)

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                I have no idea what point you are trying to make.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                White people don’t eat shitloads of onion and garlic, anon.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                I eat lots of garlic and onion, and I think a lot of other "white people" do. Please go back to r/cats or whatever shit hole you crawled out of.

                this homie cooking for a dog

                The dog food I was feeding him was like $4 per can for wet food and $50+ for a 16 pound bag of kibble. Since it lasts pretty long, you don't think about it that often, but the amount I was wasting was getting ridiculous.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                where the frick are you from those are literally sterotypical white people foods

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                If you cook without spices, without garlic, and without onions, you can give your food to your dog.
                A little garlic can help get rid of parasites though. If you've got a big dog and aren't Italian there's probably little risk of adverse effects.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                >If you cook without spices, without garlic, and without onions, you can give your food to your dog.
                That wouldn't taste very good to people. Do you eat such bland food?

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                Blacker than you Deiondre

              • 10 months ago
                Cowboi69

                Dogs can eat a little bit of powdered garlic or onion just fine.

                >sweet potato
                can't this kill them?

                Cook sweet potatoes are good and are commonly used in dog food.

                >cookings cheaper.
                so is your time. when you have a family (well, i dont know about you specifically) to also worry about, spending 30-60 minutes on a meal for the dog everyday suddenly becomes a lot less important. you don't have to feed your dog the cheapest ol' roy goyslop, but cooking for them every day is also too much in the other direction

                >Family
                Speaking of family. You can just cook in bulk for the whole family (including the dog.) I myself like to do that when I have the luxury of being home. Save times and money. The other members don't have to cook now and can do your chores for you in exchange.

                OP here.

                Doing a little research, and finding some info on ratios.
                1/2 meat, 1/4 veggies, 1/4 rice seems to be what actual vets are saying, despite some recipes online suggesting much more veggies and rice than that.

                Calcium supplements, plus omega-3 fatty acid and multivitamin supplements are also pretty commonly recommended. Grinding up egg shells is also an option for calcium. Just meat, veggies, rice and eggs probably doesn't have a complete enough nutrition profile.

                Still not sure if frying ground beef in oil is really the best, but I guess as long as you pour off the excess fat that comes out, it should be good. Or switching to ground turkey would solve the grease issue. When you fry ground beef in a skillet, there is just so much grease that comes out of it.

                Cheese or evaporated milk would help with the calcium and other nutrients, proteins, and fat. If you want a low fat meat, it doesn't get much lower than rabbit meat.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                Powdered bone or raw meaty bones are also good for calcium. Dogs can eat most non load bearing raw bones. Beef ribs are good.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                They can also eat pickled load bearing bones if they pickled. Vigor weakens it.

                Oats aren't good for dogs. Grains aren't part of their natural diet, and again it gets processed into sugars, which they can't digest.

                [...]
                A lot of dogs are lactose intolerant, cheese and yoghurt are alright if they aren't, but only in small doses.

                Anya doesn't seem to be lacking toast. What breeds tend to be best able to eat cheese?

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                Pickled? This doesn't seem like a dog-friendly thing to do to food.

              • 10 months ago
                Cowboi69

                Dogs love pickles

  17. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    When you boil vegetables their vitamins and minerals leach into the water, water that you are pouring out. A lot of what is lost may already be in the beef and eggs but a workaround might be worth it. Consider sneaking a multivitamin for dogs into the food. Something used by breeders with trace minerals like boron maybe. If you have outdoor space feeding FROZEN raw meat is good for variety. I’ve had super picky dogs chew through frozen swai filets, old freezer burned steaks, whole tilapia, and skinless chicken thighs despite all the extra effort. Raw frozen bone breaks into neat rounded chips that digest well. Just don’t feed raw salmon unless it’s been frozen for months. Parasites in salmon really love growing in dog brains for some reason.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >When you boil vegetables their vitamins and minerals leach into the water, water that you are pouring out. A lot of what is lost may already be in the beef and eggs but
      Yeah, I figure they are mostly there for fiber. I might try steaming them, but at this point, I'm trying to soak the veggies in the beef water to add flavor. When I've tried giving him carrots before, he just chewed the carrot into thousands of little chunks for fun, but didn't eat any of it.

      >Consider sneaking a multivitamin for dogs into the food.
      I probably will do this. I had a multivitamin powder that the breeder sent me home with, but since it was a powder, it got in his whiskers while he was eating, and seemed to deter him from eating. He'd always wipe his face on my bed after eating to get it out. Probably will be fine once it becomes a little waterlogged, though.

      >feeding FROZEN raw meat is good for variety.
      He gets a raw bone every few days, but I'm not really sold on a totally raw diet. I had an aunt who tried to feed her dogs raw meat regularly, and they were constantly throwing up.

  18. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    jesus christ dude imagine being this much of a cuck to your pet. leave the fricking kibble out. it'll learn that that's all it's getting and that eating it is better than starving. have some balls

    • 10 months ago
      Cowboi69

      >Eat your goyslop or starve
      Anon you have the potential to become one of our oligarchs.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >leave the fricking kibble out. it'll learn that that's all it's getting and that eating it is better than starving.
      I've done this. He literally stares at it all day while his stomach is rumbling. Eventually, late at night, he eats like a third or half of it and then it all starts over the next day. His ribs and hips are much more prominent than they should be, and he's underweight for his age and breed. You have obviously never owned a dog that was picky with food.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Man that sucks. My dog did this a little bit when she was a puppy.
        But she also had fricking ring worm and other parasites when we got her so that might have had something to do with it too.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Dogs can legitimately have autism. And they do make raw food mixes ins o places, you know, just to make sure your dog is getting all the vitamins and minerals it needs and not lacking any deficiencies.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      This but unironically. If he has to starve for an entire week straight then he starves for an entire week straight. Self-preservation instincts will eventually kick in.

  19. 10 months ago
    Cowboi69

    I like to feed a little bit of what I eat to Anya. She normally doesn't like burger buns, but if she sees me take a bite she can't help it but to try it. Makes dinner dates a lot easier. Just gotta make sure it's something both of us can eat.
    A few foods that my dog enjoys are as follows.
    Carrots
    Pickles
    Raw eggs
    Rice with flavoring
    Anchovies
    And cheese
    I imagine she'd enjoy rice dumplings, but I lack the means to make them. But you can easily make all sorts of dishes with. But if you need more recipes and ingredients I suggest https://m.youtube.com/@GoneToTheSnowDogs

  20. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >my cat: has been eating random goy pellets for 15 years, does not leave the house
    >my dog: goes on hunger strike and jumps the fence if not served good food, no kibble, destroys the door if not allowed to leave the house
    Do you have a husky or spitz mix perhaps

    “Pets should be thankful” but I’m pretty sure they’re smart enough to know there’s more than one person that likes dogs out there. They watched a farmers dog commercial. It’s too late.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      He's a wheaten.

  21. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    This was my first attempt. They say you’re supposed to gradually transition them to new foods, right?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Forgot photo

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        And here is is after he chowed down.

        Tell me more about how impossible it is for dogs to be picky or how he must be sick.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          And interestingly, when I broke up the egg and mixed that with his kibble, he seemed to prefer the yolks. Didn’t really like the egg whites. So don’t assume he eats any whole food just because it isn’t kibble.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          hahaha what a little homosexual he is. I sort of know what your going through, my dog doesn't really care for kibble, but if its wet and she knows she is gonna have to eat it or go hungry for the night, she'll go ahead

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/GSrU3mg.jpg

        He's a wheaten.

        yum yum I bet you gays eat this slop daily

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          It’s dog food. What.

  22. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Gay dog

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Cat owner

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      kys LGBT

  23. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pets don't have the luxury of being "picky". They either eat what you give them or they die. It's still better than what they would have in the wild so they should really fricking thankful anyone cares enough about them at all to give them free food.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      yes, in fact, they do

      they are picky if you are feeding them something that makes them sick, or if they are already sick which lowers their appetite

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      LOL

      This is what happened when I mixed wet food with dry food. Notice any wet food left? Because all the dry food is still there. Some of the kibbles were sucked on and spit out because he hates them.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Some animals are like autistic children. They literally would rather starve than eat something they can't stand.

  24. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah there's probably something wrong with him

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      This, did you ask your vet to check him over? He might have something as simple as a toothache and the hard kibble hurts to eat

      Pets don't have the luxury of being "picky". They either eat what you give them or they die. It's still better than what they would have in the wild so they should really fricking thankful anyone cares enough about them at all to give them free food.

      I bet you're just a b***h magnet, aren't ya little guy?

  25. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't have a d*g

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Dog website, redditor. Back to your safe space

      [...]

      https://i.imgur.com/eBq9iWl.jpg

      I have an incredibly picky dog and kibble and wet dog food are incredibly expensive to waste when he doesn’t eat it. He literally would leave his food out all day and maybe nibble 1/3 of it late at night when his hunger got the best of him. When I added cheese, meat or wet food to his kibble, he would just eat that off the top and leave the dog kibble. Since he’s become really skinny the past 4 or 5 months since becoming so picky, I decided to just cook him some food on the stovetop. Here’s what I’ve been making:

      Lean ground beef - boiled in water and all fat drained, then rinsed again
      Carrots and sweet potato - chopped small and boiled with the ground beef
      Brown rice
      Hardboiled eggs

      What do you think? Any missing nutrients? Should I keep the gross fat oil with the ground beef and brown it in a skillet with cooking oil? Anyone have a guide to ratios of meat to veggies, or how to gauge how much to feed?

      I would stir wet food into the kibble and take your dog to the vet because they act like this when they’re in pain which could be whole body arthritis a spine injury or cancer

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        > I would stir wet food into the kibble
        I did this many times. Two outcomes: he eats the wet food off the kibbles and spits out the kibbles like they are inedible pits. Or he just turns up his nose and doesn’t eat it at all, letting his stomach rumble all day.

        >and take your dog to the vet because they act like this when they’re in pain which could be whole body arthritis a spine injury or cancer
        He’s a 16 month old puppy. Trust me, he’s incredibly healthy. He’s just picky. He was picky with the food that the breeder had him on (Diamond Naturals), and then I switched him to Purina Pro Plan Puppy, which he LOVED, but when I tried to blend adult food into the puppy food (same Purina Pro Plan brand), he acted offended and hasn’t been into his food since then. Hence why it’s only been a big issue for the past 4-5 months, since I switched. Since then, I’ve tried mixing wet food, I’ve tried cheese, I tried going back to the puppy kibble, I tried another brand of kibble—all as gradually of a transition as I have been able to, of course. He still hates it.

        When I feed him homemade, real food like this, he eats every bite, so he clearly has an appetite.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Is he a h*sky? Because they are notorious buttholes when it comes to refusing food.

          If you are absolutely certain there is no illness or rotten teeth or what have you as the cause (ie checked by a vet), what you should do is offer the food for ten minutes, and remove it entirely if he doesn't eat. Offer it again at a later time during the day and follow the same principle of leaving it for ten minutes and then remove it again if he doesn't eat
          No treats in between or other high reward foodstuff to be mixed in with the food you want him to eat. Don't leave a bowl just sitting there all day, this creates the problem you are describing.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            Wheaten terrier. My parents have the same breed, and he was also incredibly picky with food. Their dog is 6 and has been like this his entire life, so I'm using that as a reference point for this kind of behavior. My main problem is mainly wasting food.

            >Offer it again at a later time during the day and follow the same principle of leaving it for ten minutes and then remove it again if he doesn't eat
            >No treats in between or other high reward foodstuff to be mixed in with the food you want him to eat. Don't leave a bowl just sitting there all day, this creates the problem you are describing.
            I've been through this procedure many times with many variations. It's not viable.

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