What are some animals you thought were aggressive, but you later learned are actually gentle?

What are some animals you thought were aggressive, but you later learned are actually gentle?

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  1. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Stallions. Got a nasty scar on my leg, but, it was an incident. Better yet, got back at him, which he respected, now he and I can stand side by side for hours, watching over his herd. Interaction with his foals, no problem. Interaction, even very intimate cuddling with his mares, no problem. He set me back on my spot, and I took my own position. I am one with this herd, and it is an experience I would not want to live without. The people who ride or own horses, miss out on being one with the herd.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      What was the incident and how did you get back at him?

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        This

        wtf is is "very intimate cuddling" you freak

        should explain it.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      wtf is is "very intimate cuddling" you freak

  2. 10 months ago
    Anonymous
  3. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    bears

  4. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    >"gotta make sure I put proper pubes on the bull's balls," the counterfeit gary larson said as he inexpertly plucked the low hanging hack fruit

  5. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I’ve seen several videos with tame or even pet honey badgers lately. They are very cute animals, but probably very high maintenance pets like Russian sables.

  6. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Reptiles and sharks being way less brutal ad robotic than expected, and that carnivores made for the more affectionate parents in a lot of cases despite being brutal

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >way less brutal ad robotic than expected
      Yeah I can get pretty critical about people anthropomorphizing animal traits & actions; but even then I was surprised at how much personality arachnids and lizards had once I encountered some as pets.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah! Seeing someone pet a spider and It never biting is an odd sight but a welcomed one, that being said I still have trouble "reading" reptiles, I can feel there's something but I can't yet pin point their main method of showing their "personality" but I can tell they can form bonds by how they treat people differently. They just didn't evolve like dogs or cats alongside us to "emote" in ways we both can understand for basic needs so It's muddled for now and shall be for some time, I know the words between "" aren't right but I don't have the right words

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah! Seeing someone pet a spider and It never biting is an odd sight but a welcomed one, that being said I still have trouble "reading" reptiles, I can feel there's something but I can't yet pin point their main method of showing their "personality" but I can tell they can form bonds by how they treat people differently. They just didn't evolve like dogs or cats alongside us to "emote" in ways we both can understand for basic needs so It's muddled for now and shall be for some time, I know the words between "" aren't right but I don't have the right words

        >in garden shed last summer
        >red admiral butterfly comes inside and gets tangled in an old cobweb
        >would normally let nature take its course, but the web was abandoned and it would die for nothing
        >fish it out to rescue it
        >legs and wings are still tied up in webbing
        >bring outside into sunlight and pick out a little shard of wood from mulch
        >use this to start breaking up and picking off the web so it can move freely again
        >at first it struggles and tries to escape, but as I keep picking the web off it eventually stops
        >as it's able to move more freely again, it lifts a leg into the air
        >since I can get at it more easily I try picking bits off that leg
        >rather than trying to get its leg away from me brushing at it, it continues to hold it up as I do so
        >eventually puts it back down, only to raise another leg
        >decide to switch to that one, and the process repeats a couple of times
        >eventually it just flies off into the distance
        It was like the butterfly realized I was trying to help it, either tried to help me get the stuff off or show me which leg it wanted doing next, then decided it was satisfied and left.
        I have never been one to anthropomorphize insects, least of all butterflies, yet that experience really makes me question if they're truly just the unthinking biological robots I'd previously assumed.

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          I had to ask myself this question after I managed to get two butterflies to stop pestering me by getting mad at them at telling them off, or when I helped a bee not drown in honey and It was very chill for the process

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          There's no such thing as a biological robot, even the simplest and most primitive organisms have a thought process

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            I can imagine a lot of animals are deeper than we let on but ones like ticks or especially internal parasites like worms are hard to imagine. Ticks just sit on grass, then suck blood for days at a time and do that either twice or three times and die.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              Ticks know where to go to find their hosts, they know when it's timeto jump, how to climb them and how to pierce their skin. They can tell when they're full and it's time to detach from their host, and they're moved by the desire to reproduce even if it doesn't aid their survival as an individual.
              Nobody installed or programmed these behaviors into them, they're all generated by the animal itself.
              I'm not saying that ticks contemplate the world or feel awe and melancholy, but they do experience reality in first person.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                >they know when it's timeto jump
                That's the thing. They don't jump (that's what fleas do). They just stretch out their front legs on top of tall grass and wait for something to pass by and they latch on. Their ability to pierce skin comes from instinct considering their biology is built around digging into flesh and inserting the mouth parts. I severely doubt that comes from smarts.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              https://i.imgur.com/4OToKZU.jpg

              so will a cat or a russell terrier puppy. your point?

              The fact that you use that image, for example.

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              I meant to say tapeworms. They have pretty much no need for any awareness. They grab on with hooks around their head after reaching adult form and that is the rest of their life.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            Jellyfish don't

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          nice story then again there was this experiment where scientist watched a wasp trying to stash her eggs in a hole with a dead insect. In which after digging the hole they always check it 1 more time after finishing it before droping the dead insect in and during her check the scientist moved the insect just a little after which the wasp went in again for a check. they did this over 50+ times before giving up and letting her be.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >critical
        More like schizophrenic and pedantic

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          I did not care for the awakening of sapient consciousness

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >way less brutal ad robotic than expected
      Yeah I can get pretty critical about people anthropomorphizing animal traits & actions; but even then I was surprised at how much personality arachnids and lizards had once I encountered some as pets.

      People who've never owned a reptile will tell you with 100% certainty they have no personality and can't show affection when that's just plainly false

  7. 10 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Based
      Love me possums

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      I still think they look gross.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Nobody said they weren't

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Based
      Love me possums

      These things are omnivores and will frick up a rodent if given the opportunity

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        so will a cat or a russell terrier puppy. your point?

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