Theoretical: Dinosaurs as an invasive species

How would humanity and the biosphere of the planet deal with dinosaurs being reintroduced into the world in numbers sufficient to be a viable breeding population?

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    They wouldn’t be able to survive because Earths climate and oxygen to C02 levels are too radically different.

    But if they were to be around, I guess we could just shoot them. Or maybe turn the raptors into sex slaves.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >oxygen to C02 levels are too radically different.
      Unless they are coming from the Triassic, that's not even remotely true.

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Hell, HUMANS are the most invasive species. Fine with me if dinos take over.

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Most ecosystems genuinely are not capable of supporting large dinosaurs
    Like what the frick is a T-rex supposed to survive on, deer?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Cows?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        homie tyrannosaurus was hunting whole-ass hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, thinking a rex could live off of cattle is like thinking a tiger or a lion can live off of small dogs.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          I mean, technically a lion COULD, it would just require a large number readily available without a resulting backlash from humans.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >January 2030
        >escaped trex eats 2 cows

        >February 2030
        >pictured: typical meat industry anti-dinosaur private mercenaries dispatched to defend factory farm (old gear subsidized by the government as food security is national priority)

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Let them loose in china, they’ll figure something out

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Personally I would try deep frying, slow cooking, stew, spices, BBQ, steaks, meatballs, etc.

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Shooting them, I imagine.
    It is not a coincidence that the supermajority of invasive species are either plants or invertebrates. The vertebrates that make it have either stupidly fast reproductive cycles (amphibians in particular) or we refuse to shoot them because muh culture (deer, goats).
    If you're big and need several years to grow to adulthood, your chance to become invasive is minimal. Not zero, but you'll need rather peculiar circumstances to make it, be it an island ecology or humans just refusing to hunt you down because hunters bad or something.
    Dinosaurs wouldn't stand a chance.
    Some sort of Jurassic fungus otoh, might well wreck the entirety of the boreal zone.

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    we would probably kill most of them and confine the remaining population to a reserve. it's not like they can wage war

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >kills your reproductive strategy
    heh, nothin personal, eggies

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      How do ratites survive?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      /thread
      I love dinosaurs but rats are such bullshit in terms of mammal success.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Eats you

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I mean it depends on what dinosaurs are introduced. If you introduce titanosaurs to the Amazon, the Congo, India, and South East Asia they'd probably do just fine and quickly outcompete the native elephants and rhinos because they are K- reproduction strategists that would swamp the regions.
      Most dinosaurs probably can't eat grass so you'd probably never get enormous herds of hadrosaurs of ceratopsians on the Great Plains or the African Savanna, but in the rainforests and temperate forests, they could probably thrive. And dinosaurs from cooler climates like Pachyrhinosaurus and Edmontosaurus might be able to thrive in the forests of California, the Pacific North West, and Appalachia, and Poland.
      You'll never get large theropods to be successful outside of areas with successful herbivorous dinosaur settlements. There just aren't enough large mammals to sustain populations of large theropods in most places. Dinosaurs like Tyrannosaurus Rex and Giganotosaurus simply can't sustain themselves on bison and cattle in the Great Plains. They'd definitely mean the extinction of elephants and rhinos anywhere they were introduced though. A bull African elephant could probably go toe to toe with a Rex or a Giga as would an angry herd of females, but elephants would take unsustainable population losses to juveniles and subadults given how long they take to reproduce. That is assuming that humans don't hunt the giant theropods to extinction first.
      Small theropods like Raptors might do pretty well all things considered.

      there have been egg-eating mammals since literally the Jurassic

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Have hippos keep proliferating in South America. Once the population is high enough, introduce large theropods in there

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