ITT: Deep sea kino

>A whale fall occurs when the carcass of a whale has fallen onto the ocean floor at a depth greater than 1,000 m (3,300 ft), in the bathyal or abyssal zones. On the sea floor, these carcasses can create complex localized ecosystems that supply sustenance to deep-sea organisms for decades.

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  1. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I first learned about these streams when /misc/ and Wauf watched them together. Enjoyable couple of threads. Rip eyebro
    Occasionally when there's an expedition going on, I'll have them on during work as background noise.
    https://www.youtube.com/@oceanexplorergov
    https://www.youtube.com/@EVNautilus

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's pretty neat. Thanks, anon!

  2. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine being Bootstrap Bill when he walked the plank on the Pearl. You feel the cold embrace of the sea as you touch the water. The pleasant rays of the sun touch you one last time as you get pulled down. For the first couple meters you still manage to equalize the pressure, but eventually your eardrums burst. It gets darker and darker, and the pain in your lungs gets ever more unbearable. Finally, at about 100 meters or so, you give in. Seawater fills your lungs, and the pain seems to diminish somewhat. Yet as you're immortal due to the Aztec gold, you cannot die. You try to catch the last dim rays of sunlight as the cannonball pulls you into the abyss. Eventually, there's only darkness left.

    You keep sinking down in absolute darkness for almost an hour. The pressure starts building up. Your entire body hurts. Your eyeballs feel as if someone was pushing his thumbs in. Your bones hurt as if they were trapped in a hydraulic press. You keep going, thinking what will happen to you next.

    Eventually, you feel a slight thump, and notice you've touched the seafloor. How far down are you? You try to look around, but there is nothing to look at. No sight, no sound - nothing. You are alone with your thoughts, for days, months, or even years. We know you'll make your deal with Davy Jones at some point, but you can't know that yet. You might be there for all eternity.

    You start losing track of time, of space, yes, even of yourself. Who are you? Are you dead? Or are you not yet born?

    Sometimes you notice stuff: strange lights in the distance, of unnamed creatures, perhaps. Dim sounds of whales from far, far away. Sometimes you feel as if something was nibbling at your back. Is this real? Or are you dreaming? There's an eerie silence and total darkness all around you. You start to feel content. You are at peace. Focused. Moisturized. Unbothered. In your lane.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      why can't he just swim up too the surface?

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        His boots were strapped to a cannonball. That's why they called him Beltrope Jack.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        When diving deep enough the human body loses buoyancy. Even if you weren't tied to something heavy you still wouldn't be able to swim up at all, like that one video where some guy dives super deep into a blue hole without the right equipment. When he got near the bottom he was sinking like a stone and you could see him walk around for a little bit on the seabed before dying of oxygen toxicity.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          >When diving deep enough the human body loses buoyancy.

          This, especially when your lungs are full of water.

          More important question: How did he make his deal with Davy Jones? Did the Dutchman just happen to run into him one day? Seems extremely unlikely given how vast the ocean is. I mean, if he spent half an eternity down there the probability would eventually reach 1, but we know for a fact it couldn't have been more than a few years, withen him being Will's father and all.

          Also, who in their right mind would let a prime Keira Knightley walk the plank instead of keeping her as the crew's wienersleeve?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      boooo

  3. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    autist mods

  4. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Holy shit fishbro, check out this totally hot babe over there!
    >The hot babe:

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      I wanna detooth it and use it as a fleshlight
      Apex predator shit

  5. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >PRÖÖÖÖÖÖÖÖÖH :DD

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      looks like a tim burton thing

  6. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Here's Ernest Shackleton's Endurance, which was found in 2022, 107 years after it sank, at 3,000 meters below sea level. It appears in wonderfully pristine condition, considering its age.

    Imagine the mysteries you could uncover if we could just examine this vessel more thoroughly. It could be little things. An unopened bottle of whiskey in the galley. The graffiti some sailor carved into the wood with his knife while he was bored. Maybe even some coins or personal belongings from one of the men. Maybe one of them carried with him the medallion of his sweetheart back home.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      It was so cool hearing that this was found but it weirded be out a little because I had just finished Shackleton's memoir when the news came out.
      Weirder yet was the discovery of Erebus and Terror right after I finished reading Frozen in Time which is about the ships and the exhumation of the sailors' bodies on Beechy Island.
      I think God is trying to tell me something

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        I forgot about that show, that shit was cool.

  7. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Octohomies travel in packs

  8. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >have to spend decades eating the same old shitty rotten whale
    I bet they'd kill for an onion ring

  9. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I chose the impossible.
    I chose Rapture.
    BUT...my city..was betrayed by the weak.
    So I ask you, my friend..would you kill the innocent? Would you sacrifice your humanity?
    We all make choices, but in the end, our choices make us.

  10. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've never really thought about a whale or fish dying of old age

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      There's a term for it, "marine snow" or something. It's all the stuff dying in the upper layers of the ocean and trickling down to the bottom: plankton, dead fish etc.
      Basically the deep sea is so fricking barren of nutrients that life down there has to cling to the tiniest source of food there is. Which is why whale falls attract so many scavengers. It might be the only time they get to eat to their hearts' content for months of even years.
      It's also the reason why deep sea fish move so eeriely slow. They must conserve energy whenever they can.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Why's it so barren of nutrients? Wouldn't everything end up there sooner or later? Or is there just too many nutrient exports further up, so everything gets eaten before it reaches the final bottom?

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          The problem is that marine snow has to go through multiple layers of increasingly desperate ocean biospheres, and what is left is basically just tiny bits of shit.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don't know how true it is but I saw a post somewhere stating that whales never die of old age, they just eventually get so old and weak they can no longer swim to the surface and drown

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Does that not count as dying of old age? That's not the actual cause of death in anything - old age just causes weakness that results in either a pathogen winning, organ failure, or predation.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          I think the difference is if you have a dog that dies of old age it reaches the point where its body is breaking down, whereas a whale that old could probably live several more years if it could just reach the surface

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Both are the same in my opinion. Both are about an organism too old to survive in its habitat. A whale too weak to surface (and thus drowning) is pretty much the same as a dog too weak to hunt (and thus starving).
            But I'd like to add that "dying of old age" is a strange and nonsensical human term anyway. Like, what's the difference between organ failure (e. g. your heart just stops one night) and let's say cancer? Cancer usually sets in at old age too, so why not count that to "dying of old age" too? It's a weird human term we ascribe to all the cases we deem to be "peaceful" and "normal" and at that age, but at the same time not all of them, etc. It doesn't even make sense for humans so I don't think you can apply it to the animal kingdom.

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              >pretty much the same as a dog too weak to hunt (and thus starving)
              It would be, and while that's age related you'd usually call that death by starvation and not by old age
              >Like, what's the difference between organ failure (e. g. your heart just stops one night) and let's say cancer? Cancer usually sets in at old age too, so why not count that to "dying of old age" too?
              I think the point is that they never get the chance to die of age related health issues like organ failure and not literally dying because you reached a certain age and your body decided that time is up

  11. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Do they speak abyssal there ?

  12. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    Alas, even the deep sea isn't safe from the destructive influence of man.

    Here's a fricking beer can at 3,780 meters depth near the Mariana Trench. It will most likely remain there for hundreds of millions of years until plate tectonics have moved it below the Earth's mantle in untold eons.

    If humanity regresses back to stone age levels of technology, as is likely considering our devastating impact on the environment, and slowly builds its way back up to our current technology levels, future humans thousands if not hundreds of thousands of years in the future might find this can and wonder what it is all about. Is it an offering to some unknown sea god? A vessel in which some ritually significant substance was held? Or simply trash some rich homosexual threw overboard while fishing for near-extinct shark species on his yacht?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      ali can would only last for like a 200 years, Black personbrain
      there isn't a material that would last for hundreds of thousands of years

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's an American planet. Deal with it, nerd.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Czech beer
        >It's an American planet. Deal with it, nerd.
        At least one thing will survive WW3, and that is the knowlede of just what a fricking shit taste Americans had when it comes to beer.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Why isn't it completely crushed by the immense pressure of the depths then? Seems like another fake outrage to me

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        It wasn't full of air

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        Because inside that can there's also immense pressure of the depths

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          can you bottle that?

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes but it would be too heavy to bring to the surface.

          • 11 months ago
            Anonymous

            I think they can synthesize heavy water (with deuterium instead of regular hydrogen) in labs although it's very difficult. Still easier than trying to bring naturally occurring heavy water up to the surface from the oceanic depths though

            • 11 months ago
              Anonymous

              that makes sense.
              the heaviest water would be at the bottom, right?

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah, something to do with the immense pressure compacting the density of hydrogen atoms turning the water from H2O into H3O

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                i thought it just sank to the bottom cause its heavy, was that wrong lol? XD

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                Where the frick did you learn that? Heavy water is still H2O but with deuterium instead of protium.

              • 11 months ago
                Anonymous

                I only drink tritium water
                >mfw I glow in the dark

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >complaining that an octopus gets a tasty drink

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Budweiser
        >tasty
        even octopuses know better anon, they're surprisingly smart

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          Tastier than seawater full of fish cum

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >It will most likely remain there for hundreds of millions of years
      do you think aluminum is indestructible?

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        What exactly would destroy it? The ocean floor is extremely persistent as there's very little currents or meteorological effects like we have on land. The aluminum is covered in an anti-rust detergent. The can isn't food.
        As such, it will remain there for millions of years unless it gets picked up by a dredge.

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          do they dredge at 4000m a lot?

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      >look it up
      >it's real

      Can anyone explain to a moron how can a can be that deep without being crushed?

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        its full of water
        pressure is equal

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        The can is open, the water is outside and inside it. No difference then pinching the inside and outside of the can between your fingers, it would equal out and not move

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        The Current-Thing crush phenomenon only happens when you descend with your own internal pressure until your structure suddenly gives way, not when you slowly descend with pressure gradually increasing

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Booohoo you green homosexual

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        do you understand the board you're on?

        • 11 months ago
          Anonymous

          I thought this was just dog frickers anonymous tbh

  13. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's fake you can see the strings.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      I can see your strings

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        I can't see you at all.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Afaik it's a whale carcass deliberately dropped by scientists so they can study the effects of decomposition. The strings are attached to buoys on the surface so they can locate it again.

      • 11 months ago
        Anonymous

        >scientists beat a whale to death with iron bars to do an experiment

        Sad but that's the only way to get results

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Those are range finding lasers

  14. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've always found the deep sea deeply fascinating for some reason. Like, we know so much about space by now. We're able to look billions of years into the early stages of the universe, capture gravitational waves of two black holes colliding billions of lightyears away some eons ago, yet we know surprisingly little about the deep sea.

    What mysteries can lie there? Maybe there are elaborate cave networks at some underwater mountain ridges which no man will ever dive in. What about all the stuff human have thrown overboard, or ancient ships sinking to the bottom of the ocean. Venture out a couple hundred miles and throw a coin or something overboard. It will forever be out of our reach.

  15. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Stage 1
    >The initial period begins with "mobile scavengers" such as hagfish and sleeper sharks actively consuming soft tissue from the carcass. Consumption can be at a rate of 40–60 kilograms (88–132 lb) per day. This stage typically lasts months up to 1.5 years.

    >Stage 2
    >The second stage introduces the "enrichment opportunists". These are animals which colonize the bones and surrounding sediments that have been contaminated with organic matter from the carcass and any other tissue left by the scavengers. This stage can last months up to 4.5 years.

    >Stage 3
    >In the third stage, sulfophilic bacteria anaerobically break down the lipids embedded in the bones. Instead of oxygen, they reduce dissolved sulfate (SO2−4) and excrete hydrogen sulfide. Due to the toxicity of H2S, only resistant chemosynthetic bacteria survive. The bacterial mats provide nourishment for mussels, clams, limpets and sea snails. As whale bones are rich in lipids, representing 4–6% of its body weight, the final digestion stage can last between 50 and possibly 100 years.

    >Stage 4
    >Some scientists postulate a fourth stage of ecological succession at whale fall sites, called the "reef stage". A whale fall enters this stage once the organic compounds have been exhausted and only minerals remain in the bones, which provide a hard substrate for suspension and filter feeders.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nature is fricking crazy man

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      mind blown

  16. 11 months ago
    Anonymous

    >The amount of carbon tied up in a typical single whale carcass (about two tonnes of carbon for a typical 40-tonne carcass) is roughly equivalent to the amount of carbon exported to a hectare of abyssal ocean floor in 100–200 years.

    • 11 months ago
      Anonymous

      fricking Aiptasia man. That shit grows everywhere

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