If cloning exists Why are any species of animals still on the brink of extinction

If cloning exists Why are any species of animals still on the brink of extinction

>china wont clone panders caused they don't want no one else to have them

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just want someone to clone a nice monkey man for me

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I just think about the Pyrenean ibex cloning attempt.
    >Following several failed attempts to revive the subspecies through cloning, a living specimen was born in July 2003. However, she died several minutes after birth due to a lung defect.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >gets a miracle chance to survive through the blessings of human empathy
      >spills their genetic spaghetti
      They should stay extinct.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sucks. They seemed pretty cool

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No genetic diversity, it's just an extremely expensive way of kicking the can. Saving eggs and male essence in gene banks makes more sense. I talked to a lot of the team that made Dolly the Megaewe.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cause you need a surrogate mother to carry the egg and give birth, which is kinda hard to do when all possible surrogate mothers are also extinct or near extinction, so just shoot some jizz in their wombs like we've been doing since forever.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >As of 2019, there are 27 zoos in 22 countries outside of mainland China, (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Qatar, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Scotland, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Russia, Taiwan, Thailand, and the United States) that have giant pandas.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Most (if not all) of them only have the pandas on loan from China. China made it illegal for anyone outside of China to own pandas. They loan out pandas as a PR stunt to show how cool China is, and pretty much all of them are part of a Chinese breeding program, so any & all offspring born outside of China remain Chinese property and must be returned at some point.

      I'm sure someone will find one or two incredibly rare exceptions, but they are exceptions. I don't even think those exceptions exist anymore in the modern world, I think the examples used for exceptions are from decades and centuries ago before China implemented the policy.

      >B..BUT THE WASHINGTON ZOO!!!!
      All on loan and all have been or will be returned. All the major, legit governments comply with the Chinese policy for diplomatic reasons, as do most private zoos. In a country such as the U.S., if a private zoo tries to acquire a panda outside of this policy, the U.S. government will assist China in getting the panda back, for diplomatic reasons.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >China made it illegal for anyone outside of China to own pandas.
        Uhhh how did they do that

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Being the biggest economy in the world will do that to you.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Pretty sure that’s still the US (for the time being anyway)

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What would be the point of cloning pandas? They are a niche species with no real purpose in nature and once their habitat is destroyed to build human stuff on they will be gone and nobody will care because they weren't really doing anything important to begin with.
    Even if they are protected completely from development eventually nature will change their habitat and they will go extinct. They're just an evolutionary fluke. A lot of animals are like this, filling no real role but evolved as a product of their environment.

    Some species are important even though not directly they play a role in the food chain or eat pests etc. But not pandas. They're just useless.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      but anon pandas are LE CUTE

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        then domesticate them and make them useful as pets

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      money for xi
      he is the most important person in the universe and everyone must give him all their possessions

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cloning isn't like that planet from Star Wars where embryos are mass produced in vats. It requires a surrogate, eggs, and a frick ton of effort that would be better spent just having two animals mate instead.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    then what do all those clone your dog places do

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Same thing as an IVF clinic. Cloning is a semi-perfect technology. The problem is that despite being really cool, it has few actual applications as sexual reproduction is cheaper and can be done by any animal. Have a cow with traits you want to replicate? Just... let it have sex.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Scam you.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The fricking what places? What's going on in america?

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Copying the DNA in a lab is the easy part. You still need to do IVF, then implant the embryo, then birth the frickin' thing, then raise it to adulthood in captivity. Can't do all that shit with white rhinos.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    we cant keep cloned animals alive for long, theyre always faulty

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      False. Dolly was just unlucky enough to get cancer. All of the other clones in that line were fine, and still alive today; as are Dolly's offspring.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      With current methods of cloning under the SCNT method the success rate 0.5%. This means you need hundreds of embryos for one successful clone and each SCNT procedure requires manual operation by well trained scientists and physicians with cellular manipulators to do each attempt at a cell transfer. This means that you need to use over ovulating drugs on female subjects to harvest the eggs which can make them sterile and it costs a shit ton of money for just one clone.

      This is all assuming that the clone can even make it to term too and it still does not solve the problems that pandas have with regards to mating behaviour. It is a waste of time that only threatens the few female pandas left with invasive surgery that can render them infertile and potential issues in genetic diversity. You want The Hills Have Eyes pandas? Because that is how you will get them.

      And despite being viable, she lived for less than half the normal lifespan of a sheep and was riddled with diseases almost the entire time. Proper cloning technology is at least a good fee decades off before it can have some limited use, let alone widespread commercial use. Then again, the military usually gets tech before we do, so if it does exist it's gonna be classified for at least another two decades.

      As other anons have pointed out this was scare mongering by the media at the time used by anti-cloning activists who were usually ARAs who saw it as a disgusting breakthrough using animals or Christians who saw it as an affront to God himself.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Wrong. Animals lived average lifespans. Scnt studies weren't followed up and new studies weren't established because of ipsc and red tape

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >ipsc
        What?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Induced pluripotent stem cells. One of the main reasons for cloning was to obtain stem cells for autologous grafts. Even the guys who made Dolly told scientists to abandon scnt because ipsc was more efficient

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >We cloned a sheep.
    >She doesn't look like the original, or even have the same dna, but trust us
    People really fell for this.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    With current processes, cloning is slow, expensive, difficult, and if you have repopulating a species in mind then you're better off just actually letting them frick.

    Until we reach "embryo in a vat that develops in a week" territory cloning is basically a novelty.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not educated on this, but wouldn't the clones have the same genetic code and cause incest issues if bred with each other?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes. It actually just makes the problem of lack of genetic diversity worse, not better. A combination of cloning and selective mutation (as in, mutating genes that you know won't cause harm) would be required.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because it's not fricking magic. It take time, money, expensive equipment, trained people, genetic profiling, and lab space.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      a zoo of extinct animals would be a major tourist attraction for Dubai or SA

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Why Dubai?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Presumably because they have heaps of money and no tact

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Because only they have enough money.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >It take time, money, expensive equipment, trained people, genetic profiling, and lab space.
      This.
      And that's not even taking until account the EXTREMELY high rate of failure. Dolly, for example, took about 300 tries before a single embryo managed to be viable.
      I don't know about the clones before her and how many attempts they took.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        And despite being viable, she lived for less than half the normal lifespan of a sheep and was riddled with diseases almost the entire time. Proper cloning technology is at least a good fee decades off before it can have some limited use, let alone widespread commercial use. Then again, the military usually gets tech before we do, so if it does exist it's gonna be classified for at least another two decades.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          As said before, all of Dolly's sibling's are still alive as are Dolly's children. Dolly getting cancer was just unlucky. There is no actual lifespan problem with cloning, that's just pop science.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          aren't there businesses that clone your pets?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        And despite being viable, she lived for less than half the normal lifespan of a sheep and was riddled with diseases almost the entire time. Proper cloning technology is at least a good fee decades off before it can have some limited use, let alone widespread commercial use. Then again, the military usually gets tech before we do, so if it does exist it's gonna be classified for at least another two decades.

        I didn't know dolly was such a fluke

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