Can an African Bush Elephant realistically take on a large theropod dinosaur?

Can an African Bush Elephant realistically take on a large theropod dinosaur?

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  1. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm going to go out on a limb and say that a healthy adult Rex could probably kill and eat anything that lived when given the opportunity.

  2. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    The weight difference between a tiger and a gaur is bigger, yet tiger can kill it because that's what predators are made for. They kill animals heavier than them.

  3. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    The dinosaur would win because his speed is superior

  4. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sure, mammals would def win against any other equivalent animal.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      an elephant is by no means equivalent to a trex

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/tlmUVFt.jpg

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Which moron wrote this?
      >individual gigantism has in effect been replaced on land by gigantism at the group level
      I suppose that's why bears and tigers mog wolf packs then

  5. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    That spinosaurus at the top is using outdated data. We've now found they have a massive paddle-like tail and a smaller, more pointy jaw for grabbing fish

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      but can it take an african bush elephant

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        Spinosaurus? Probably not. It didn't really have the musculature or facial bone structure to support fighting a big large creature like that. It kept to the waters and mostly hunted, as far as we can tell, smaller fish and reptiles.

        Anything else on that OP list though would tear a bull elephant to pieces before it even realized what's up. Modern elephant skin is designed to fend off versus slashing and light piercing, as from a lion. It simply cannot hold up to the immense pressure that a tyrannosaurid's jaw could put in, and the dinosaur would just rip chunks and chunks off of the elephant until it bled out.

        Tusks on an elephant are helpful, but all of those dinosaurs are experienced, or would have had the opportunity to have experienced, in fighting ceratopsids. Immense tusked and horned enemies aren't something new to the dinosaurs, but a jaw capable of ripping half their face off of a few square foot hole in the side of the elephant is something an elephant has no clue how to face

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          to play devil's advocate, the elephant's tusks are angled differently and at least in my opinion in such a way that it would be uncomfortable to deal with for the first time especially if the two charge one another head on. the tusks are likely more durable than a ceratopsid's horns on the fact that they're ivory instead of bone, i guess

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            >*Steps on your tusk*
            what now

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              You fool! They're pointy!

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          or the fact they have giant floppy ears, if theres one thing animal fighting has shown, giant loose flaps of skin are begging to get grab and ripped off. the only reason why elephants still have them is because theres no animal large enough to advantage of that

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      We know, kid
      We know

  6. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't see this one going well for the T-Rex. Rave all you want about predation but this is a head on fight to the death, right?

  7. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    didn't large theropods hunt things like triceratops and even sauropods?

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Ceratospians
      They could solo, even the larger ones
      >Sauropods
      You would like like 5 of these at least to rotate and be able to bring down a single - healthy adult - one.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        >You would like like 5 of these at least to rotate and be able to bring down a single - healthy adult - one.
        One what? It entirely depends on the species. Not all sauropods were the size of Sauroposeidon.

  8. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can't take the elephant out of its herd because that's one of the ways it's evolved to defend itself. And a therapod would probably think better than to frick with a herd of angry elephants.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      tch... if there's anything i've learned from Wauf vs threads it's that t-rexes moved at light speed and had bites hundreds of times stronger than the pressure of the mariana trench kid

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      >And a therapod would probably think better than to frick with a herd of angry elephants
      Anon, these are animals that "fricked with" herds of angry ceratopsians and sauropods for a living.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        You watch too many movies if you think t-rexs ate healthy adult sauropods out of a pack whenever they wanted. They would have hunted like animals do today and separated out the young, weak and old. No predator is going to risk getting a foot squash or side punctured because then it's their last hunt.

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          Not if it's any bigger than a tiger or perhaps even a bear, a strong enough bite in the top of it's neck will probably kill them fairly easily, even more if it's from a Dino who specializes in killing ceratops that were far larger than elephants and had their necks heavily protected and far thicker bones, a t-rex would be a death sentence to any elephant today, also elephants don't have herds like bovines, they are more like a tribe so just sacrificing one and keep running is mostly out of the question

          You watch too little elephants if you think the an elephant would be better at defending itself from a large theropod than a young/weak/old triceratops (which evolved specific traits to protect themselves form them)

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous
          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            that pic is a bit exaggerated there lol. might as well use godzilla

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              I do believe they use Rexy (the one from Jurassic Park) size. She's a big girl (4U), but not a giant.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                how's this?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Sue isn't the biggest.
                And the difference between Sue and the others rex is much more little than Angola and the average elephants

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                what's the biggest?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                We found ?
                Scotty, 13m / 43 feet long.
                Slightly longer than Sue , and still not that big compared to average rex.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Not that anon but I'm fairly certain Scotty was quite a bit bigger, I'm sure there's unnamed fragmentary remains that are even bigger.

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              Nope they really were that big, JPark was not exaggerating Rex size. Don't confuse the egregious size errors of the Raptors and Dilophosaurus with the Rex, which while lipless and blind is at least faithful to the animal's irl dimensions.

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              the heights are very roughly to scale, but even if they were slightly shorter and stood a little bit more upright (couldn't be much otherwise the lengths wouldn't mach), that wouldn't even matter because the mouth would be in the same place, above the elephant's neck

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            And that's not even taking account on what the largest ever T.rex could be.

  9. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Possibly, main issue is no living elephant today or any time in possibly ever has had to fight a predator as large or larger than itself.
    At the same time some predators could be discouraged to fight something like an elephant with the family unit dynamic but others like Trex would just consider it another day of the week.

  10. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bruh, a fricking bear could easily kill a T-Rex.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous
    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Jesus, some people were really insecure their favorite animals would get shitstomped by dinosaurs.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      >half a second after the bear realises the King presence

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        >3d models are my passion

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        why is it covered in gravel

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          It's camouflage

  11. 9 months ago
    Anonymous

    You kidding me? Definitely

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      trains arent really a big deal, a couch can cause them to derail

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Probably derailed it by getting run over by it due to standing its ground.

  12. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    what absoluite pedophole put giant with apostrophes theyre fricking big man dont be a puss about it

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      There's bigger things

  13. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    What's the deal with that first dinosaur? The legs look too small for the size

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      you know how there's a "rule of cool" in fiction? paleontologists have taken it upon themselves to create a "rule of uncool" when reconstructing and speculating dinosaurs

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Crocodile LARP taken too far.

  14. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    What about this bad boy?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Hard to say, but there's fairly good evidence that Rex hunted pic related too.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        how would this even work?

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Large theropods like allosaurus had serrated knife shaped teeth, they could slash the sauropods open and wait for them to bleed out.

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            Similar to komodo dragons I could see it being a pretty successful strategy for a large group hunting predator.
            >attack hard and fast and retreat out of harm's way
            >watch said meal either wear down from blood loss or infection to bring the prey down
            >profit

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          I bet a grown T rex could take down a young sauropod
          Suposedly giganotosaurus hunted argentinosaurus, so anything is possible

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Suposedly giganotosaurus hunted argentinosaurus, so anything is possible
            they didn't even live together, that was mapusaurus

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Most theropods in a sauropod ecosystem eat the thousands of babies and juveniles. The ones that target the subadults or adults probably have to bait them into exhausting themselves before giving the sauropod a grievous wound and waiting for them to weaken.

          The allosauroids and carcharodontosaurids are thought to have used their slicing adapted teeth to rip a big bleeding gouge in their prey, but Tyranosaurus is less adapted for slicing with his teeth and more adapted for crushing and ripping.

          A Tyrannosaur wouldn’t be able to slash a meters long trough like a giganotosaurus or other carcharadontosaurid, but he could maybe take a 50 kilo lump out of a leg and he would have no issue severing the neck if he could get it down at his level.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        No there isn't lmao
        Only a 5 year old would genuinely believe that sauropods didin't bully theropods the same way elephants bully everything else around them

        • 10 months ago
          Anonymous

          Elephants aren’t immune to predation

          https://i.imgur.com/XDjxT0d.jpg

          Hell no.
          T-Rex wasn't build to hunt sauropods (allosaurids were) and Alamosaurus was up to 7 times bigger than a fully grown and large T-Rex.

          A mated pair of Tyrannosaurs would be closer in mass to Alamosaurus than a pride of lions are to an elephant, and lions eat elephants.

          Megatherapods eat titanosaurs because there is nothing that lacks predators (except in insular and incomplete ecologies), not even Blue Whales, and there’s nothing else in the ecology which could eat the titanosaurs. Therefore the megatherapods do.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            >lions eat elephants.
            baby elephants not adults

            • 10 months ago
              Anonymous

              No, adult elephants. Google the Savute pride and the Mapula pride. Their elephant eating is the best documented. They are eating adult female elephants, mostly, but occasionally a bull.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                I googled it. What I found is that they mostly hunt subadult elephants who are old enough to have left the protection of the herd and be on their own, but not fully grown yet, mostly young adult males, because females tend to stay with the herd.
                The only case of a bull elephant killed seems to be a bull that was already injured by another bull elephants, and otherwise most attempts on adult elephants fail.

                And they hunt at night when the elephants can't see nearly as well as the lions and their hunting strategy involves jumping on their back.
                So I don't see how that's applicable to t-rexes and sauropods.

              • 10 months ago
                Anonymous

                >the predator with the largest eye of any terrestrial animal was obviously not a night hunter.
                I’m not saying that a Tyrannosaur would use lion hunting techniques (particularly riding, lmao), but there will always be a scenario that makes something vulnerable to predation, isolation, exhaustion, infirmity of agedness, disease, injury, etc. Predators always look for vulnerability, and being large and mature doesn’t change this.

          • 10 months ago
            Anonymous

            a lion is getting mutilated by an elephant in a head on fight and i think that's what OP meant

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            >there is nothing that lacks predators
            ahem

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              The juveniles are still vulnerable to predation.

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              Cannibalism, moron.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Other orcas are like the one large sea creature that hasn’t been recorded being eaten by orcas. Cannibalism just doesn’t happen as far as we know

                The juveniles are still vulnerable to predation.

                To what? The japanese?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Not true. Migratory (mammal killer) packs are known to prey on resident (fish eater) packs. I'm confident that this sort of conflict is possible whenever orcas of different culture groups cross paths.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Migratory (mammal killer) packs are known to prey on resident (fish eater) packs
                They virtually always ignore each other. I’m not aware of any instance of transients hunting residents and observations of the two seems to suggest they don’t engage

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                >known to prey on resident (fish eater) packs
                They’re specifically known not to

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              Where are the feathers?

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous
      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Hell no.
        T-Rex wasn't build to hunt sauropods (allosaurids were) and Alamosaurus was up to 7 times bigger than a fully grown and large T-Rex.

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          And lions aren't built to hunt elephants and giraffes, but they still occasionally kill them.
          You have to understand that animals are specialized but only to a point; nature is not as autistic and rigid as most of the people who apparently study it. T. rex hunting alamos was probably infrequent and unsafe for the rexes, but that doesn't mean it never happened.

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            Find me an instance of a single or pair of Lions killing a giraffe or elephant if you want this to be taken seriously. T-rex MAY have hunting in breeding pairs but they we're certainly not socially bonded pack predators.
            The Lion pride in Africa known for its elephant hunting behavior is 30 animals strong. And lion prides hunting large prey like Giraffe and Buffalo are seldom less than 4 full grown adults, and usually more like 5-8 animals, so they can rotate in and out of the fight to rest or to retreat if injured without losing the kill.

            Also Rex could not jump and as such likely could not attack anything vital on a Sauropod, attacking the legs of such a creature is likely to just get you stomped to death. Lions take down Buffalo and Elephants by jumping up on their backs and biting them in the spine above the rear legs ,

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous
              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                The giraffe is still alive

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                In the image yes, after the photo was taken no

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                No. It will forever live in my heart

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Shit, this made me realize how big giraffes were.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        Lol, no there isnt. I'm not saying Rex couldn't hunt sub-adults, but they were not built to hunt Sauropods. Their range barely overlaps with that of Alamosaurus and mirrored most of the other Hell Creek dinosaurs not the Ojo Alamo and Kirtland dinosaurs which is why there are actually different genera of Tyrannosaurs in those formations unlike in Hell Creek where Rex had such singular dominance.

        how would this even work?

        If the Acrocanthosaurus track way is anything to go by, they rushed them, bit into them and then ran away and hoped they didnt get stepped on or smacked by a tail. Then they continued to do this process a few dozen more times until the giant died. Based on Mapusaurus, it's likely that the giant Carcharaontosaurids hunted in mixed age packs ( mobs may be more accurate since people get so ass mad when you say pack) so that probably helped.

        Elephants aren’t immune to predation
        [...]
        A mated pair of Tyrannosaurs would be closer in mass to Alamosaurus than a pride of lions are to an elephant, and lions eat elephants.

        Megatherapods eat titanosaurs because there is nothing that lacks predators (except in insular and incomplete ecologies), not even Blue Whales, and there’s nothing else in the ecology which could eat the titanosaurs. Therefore the megatherapods do.

        Alamosaurus probably did have a sauropod specialist that could hunt them, but we only have very fragmentary evidence of this undescribed Tyrannosaurid. Maybe in the small area that Rex and Alamosaurus' ranges overlapped there was a strange murder of Tyrannosaurs that were sauropod specialists like the elephant specialist lions you point too, but they almost certainly did not represent the norm and likely had specific cultures to engage in this behavior that could be potentially wiped out similar to how Cape Buffalo hunting specialist lions can be destroyed if key members of the pack are killed. Rex just wasnt built to hunt these animals and didnt interact with them enough to need to be.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        if I got a good chokehokd on it I'd frick that b***h up

  15. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know, but I'm not betting against a pissed off bull elephant.

  16. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Easily. Intelligence evolved a lot since dinosaurs. Modern animals are significantly smarter than prehistoric ones. Any dinosaur would appear stupid and lethargic next to any modern animal.

  17. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    moron here, do triceratops and elephants have any relation?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      No, but your dad and your mother might be related.

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        sweet

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yes but not in terms of evolution. It's a recurring archetype

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >not in terms of evolution
        wrong. They're both amniotes

  18. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Spinosaurus probably. That thing seems a lot lankier and less muscular than the other ones

  19. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Elephants see time sped up compared to us. They would die very quickly. They're not prepared for predators larger than themselves.

  20. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I could

  21. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'd place them on roughly even footing. If the theropods get a good bite in the elephant will probably die, especially if T. rex gets to put its full bonecrushing weight into it, but you have to remember that a biped is necessarily less stable and sturdy than a quadruped (especially a fast and maneuverable quadruped like an elephant), and dinosaurs are infamous for their hollow bones and streamlined body-mass, whereas elephants use their bulk to maintain their status as kings of the jungle for good reason. However elephants are typically regarded for their strength against smaller things, as a sauropod to a theropod by comparison, and it's totally up in the air for how they'd deal with a predator as large as themselves.

  22. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Giant theropods hunted and killed things a lot bigger and more dangerous than elephants.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not by the new findings. It states there scavangers only.

  23. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Theropods got more bang for their buck in terms of mass and strength thanks to their ability to absorb oxygen into their bones. A large theropod could fight an elephant squarely and, if things aren't going too well, just outlast him with their better stamina.

  24. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    I think so, yeah

  25. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    The elephant is only adapted to take on tiny creatures. To take on a trex they would need their trusts pointing up, just like the triceratops had.

    How the FRICK did you not make this association yet?

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >lifts head upwards
      What now

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        Anon it doesn't have that movement range.

  26. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    A fully grown triceratops is a far far far more formidable, bigger, stronger and more heavily armed opponent. They were a prey item for a large theropod. I'd Imagine a Bush elephant would attempt to flee if a large theropod were to charge at it, as they are intelligent and would immediately understand the danger they were in. A fleeing bush elephant would die 10 times out of 10. If it was a large Bush elephant in musth I can imagine it being able to fend one off. Since a theropod would be attacking with, well it's face, the elephant would struggle to topple it as it would have to charge at it's hip not it's face or torso. The theropod on the other hand, being taller and in most cases heavier would have had an easier time to topple the elephant unless it was caught retreating.
    Once toppled, a theropod would no doubt be injured, but not killed. Adult Bush elephants are unable to kill much smaller adverseries such as hippos or rhinos if they topple and gore them. Large theropods would be able to regain footing and reengage or disengage easier than those aforementioned animals.

    Should also be noted that large theropods on average are significantly larger than a bush elephant. You can imagine a 10 ton elephant, but it's equivalent would probably be a 12 or 15 ton theropod as they would represet the maxima of their species.
    Toppled elephants however would almost certainly be dispatched quickly, since the theropod would be going for the neck, pinning it down.

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >12 or 15 ton theropod
      Where the frick are you getting these measurements, t-rex was 8 tons tops

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >12 or 15 ton theropod
      what the frick are you talking about, even Dan's super liberal weight estimates put Rex and Giganotosaurus at 10.4 tons at max
      https://www.thecodontia.com/blog/the-largest-theropod-dinosaur-known-to-science

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        There existed billions of t-rexes, if we assume that 8-9 tons were average for a fully grown specimen, a freakish giant represetation (like what a 10 ton bush elephant represent) would probably be 12-15 tons, 14-15 meters long. That we have not found such a specimen does not mean it is probable that they existed. Unless you want to argue that Stan and Sue represent close to the upper maxima, or 1/1000+ large animals and we just happened to be extremely lucky to find them. Even then, 13+ meter 10+ ton ones are almost a certainty.

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Once toppled, a theropod would no doubt be injured, but not killed. Adult Bush elephants are unable to kill much smaller adverseries such as hippos or rhinos if they topple and gore them.
      You're forgetting that unlike a hippo or a rhino, theropod bones are hollow. An elephant that steps on a downed rex's leg, ribcage, neck, what have you would shatter it in an instant, like Chinese glass under a hydraulic press.
      Once it's on the ground, it's fricked.

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        Why do people this ignorant about animals in general come to this site

      • 9 months ago
        Anonymous

        These are living animals, not a pile of bones facing the destilled essence of finland trying make a youtube video to figure out their compression strength.
        You could create a thousand scenarios where an elephant has a chance at goring a downed t-rex, but I'd imagine most of them would end in the elephant having it's trunk in a vice grip, resulting in a paniced elephant trying desperately to get loose as it's most sensitive appendage were in immediate danger of being torn off.

        • 9 months ago
          Anonymous

          Have you ever heard the expression “the bigger they are the harder they fall”? If an elephant somehow tackled the t-rex down using its own strength the rex would probably be injured. If the elephant for whatever reason uses its front legs to stomp on the rex it’s probably going to crush whatever it hits

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            T-rex weight: ~12 metric tons
            Average elephant bull wheight: 6 metric tons
            It's like saying a 3kg rabbit could very well kill a bald eagle by tackling it and then stomping it in the ground

            • 9 months ago
              Anonymous

              3kg is not the same as 6000kg and a 5kg body meant for flying is not the same as a 12000kg terrestrial body falling 13 feet down but only in your DREAMS did the average tyrannosaurus rex weigh 12000 kilograms. you mean pounds. if you’re talking averages rex would be about 6000 kg and the bull elephant would be about 5500kg. the elephant has two main advantages in a direct confrontation, being a quadruped and not having hollow bones. IF the elephant completely knocks the rex down that’s an easy injury and IF it stomped on the rex with both front legs the rex is breaking inside like its skeleton is made of porcelain.
              unless the rex is very very hungry it would probably avoid a direct head on fight with an african bush elephant during musth

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                >being a quadruped
                >not having hollow bones
                you say that like it means something when trexs fight triceratops a much more dangerous quarry than an elephant

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                it makes a world of difference that the real world isn’t anime lol. rexes were scavengers and ambushed trikes. we're talking a fight here and it’s very unlikely that a rex would directly confront a healthy adult trike. assuming a rex went head to head with a trike it would probably lose.
                if you look at the t rex it would probably prey upon the elephant in a similar fashion to the triceratops and avoid needless direct confrontations

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                >rexes were scavengers
                All predators with the mental capacity to identify dead animals as food will scavenge. Rex is no more a scavenger than a tiger, however.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                >rexes were scavengers
                If they were scavengers, than what was hunting Triceratops?
                Scavengercels never have a good answer for this.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                My man, T-rex being 6000kg is decades old information. Volumetric estimations place them at 8-9 tonnes, and it is more than likely that this weight represent an average of the species.
                I've said this before, but billions of t-rexes existed, the chance of Sue or Stan representing the species maxima, like what a 10 tonne elephant represents is close to nill. It is more than likely that T-rexes exceeding 10 tonnes were as common for the species as were elephants over 6 tonnes. Some go crazy with the numbers, but I'd imagine a 1:1000 or 1:10 000 large individual of the species being 15+ meters long and 13-15 tonnes in weight.
                You also have to consider than an elephant half the weight of a rex would never try to fight it, it would flee... since elephants are not idiots and would know it was in mortal danger. If you make a scenario where a 5 ton elephant stood its ground against an 8 ton rex, a frontal charge would almost certainly not knock a rex over. It has to charge at its centre of gravity else a rex would pivot and divert the force away. This would not happen in a frontal charge, all that would happen is the elephant getting its neck or trunk pinned.
                If we give the elephant even more help and imagine it got to charge at a rex's hips and managed to knock one down, all you got now is a massive muscled thigh in goring range, all the while the rex will get back up while also being in position to clamp down on the elephants trunk.
                Now, for your idea that such a fall would break it's bones, that's a silly idea. You could imagine a rex tripping while going full speed resulting in a risk of injury, simply falling on it's side would certainly not injure it. It has copious amounts of muscle and fat to cushon the force of the impact. As for the Elephant stomping on it's bones, you do realize that those bones support far more weight during locomotion than an animal half it's weight could bring to bear by stepping on them right? They were not that fragile.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Lmao. And they breathed atomic fire too, right? And they could fly?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Predator would win against herbivore half it's weight based on such superpowers as "being able to bear its own weight" and "being bipedal"
                >Lmao you fanboy, bet you think T-rex can fly too.

                The absolute state of this board.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                No. Do tell me about these mythical T-Rexes as they exist in your mind. They ran at Mach speeds I bet

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Are you schizophrenic by chance?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                No. Keep interviewing me, though

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                No. Do tell me about these mythical T-Rexes as they exist in your mind. They ran at Mach speeds I bet

                Jesus, it's embarassing for all of us.
                It's not a big deal : animals were bigger and stronger before, it's ok, why are you mad about that ?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                >noooooo muh evolution is about increasing efficiency and improvement, also the best new animals are mammals like us humans who must be better than dinos!!!!

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                mate what is your source for the average t-rex being 7000kg? you'll understand that i can't take someone else's word for anything and most sources i seem to find agree with my numbers. i agree that the elephant would not go out of its way to fight the rex but i have to double down and assume the rex would rather not confront the elephant directly and opt for an ambush. but if the bull elephant is on musth? i see the elephant charging madly while making those ungodly noises and the rex not wanting a piece of it unless it's starving.
                >that's a silly idea.
                is it? let's go with your numbers. that's 8000 kilograms not simply falling down but getting thrown down and later trampled in this hypothetical situation. i don't mean the elephant would simply step on the rex and the bones would snap. i interpreted the situation as an elephant pulling one of those silly circus tricks where it stands on its hind legs and then brings its front legs down with its weight behind it right on the rex's side. if you think this wouldn't injure if not outright mortally wound a t rex i don't know what to tell you. i would have to agree with anon that your idea of a tyrannosaurus rex is a kaiju.
                but ignoring the stomp that's still 8000+ kg with hollow bones falling 3 meters with no effective way of bracing into a hard surface and it's not getting tipped over but thrown down by a 5500kg quadruped that can look at it at eye level. do you really think this falls under what a t rex or indeed anything terrestrial can just shrug off?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Source? Just try to find a paper or article written about the t-rex in the last two years that put the rex at 6 tons. I doubt you will be able to. There has been so much noice around the new weight estimations that the 8 ton figure is pretty much everywhere now.
                I'm guessing that Stan and Sue represent a large average adult rex and that the upper maxima of the species could be as much as 50% heavier based off that.
                I don't see how it is kaiju-esque to doubt that a t-rex would be injured from being knocked over by an elephant much smaller than it, it's not like it would be sent flying by the force. The Rex would land on it's hip, allowing the muscles and fat of its thighs to cushon the impact.
                You're then imagining that the elephant would somehow trample it to death, again it is a much larger and heavier muscled animal, it's not like an elephant stepping on bones that can already take the stress of an 8 ton body in full motion will cause them to break like crackers. That's not even factoring in what a Rex would be doing in defence, again if it clamps down on the trunk the advantage is immediately lost. The only situation where the elephant has a chance is if it somehow gets to charge at the Rex's hips, which seems unlikely, and even then the elephant would not have an easy time of it.
                We're talking about a predator larger, heavier, more agile and with better weapons somehow loosing, it just seems unlikely no matter how you approach it. 10/10 times the Rex would just chace down a panicked Elephant and clamp down on it's neck. Males in musth would potentially face off agaist it, but how would it get to charge at it's centre of gravity to push it down in the first place? Again, it is just a bigger, heavier, stronger animal. Not saying an Elephant does not posess the heft and strength to injure or kill a T-Rex, I am just not seeing how that's happening

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                i've searched enough sources. if this ties into the notion that t-rex was morbidly obese then i have no interest in it. you'd do well to clarify.
                that kaiju comment pertained to what i said about the hypothetical stomp. address that. and i never said simply knocked over. he is getting THROWN in this hypothetical scenario.
                >it's not like an elephant stepping on bones that can already take the stress of an 8 ton body in full motion will cause them to break like crackers
                why not? if we assume the elephant throws down and completely tramples the t-rex you don't think it will injure the thing? are you being serious?? that the hollow bones can support 6000 kg doesn't mean it can shrug off and not be damaged whatsoever from a bulldozing by a 5500 kg animal like an elephant, it was also incredibly disingenuous to compare it to the much lighter, lithe and aerodynamic eagle. the t-rex is not built in such a way that it will mindlessly charge something like an african bush elephant.
                >but how would it get to charge at it's centre of gravity to push it down in the first place
                mate it's a stocky quadruped who can just about look at the t rex at eye level. it's necessarily more stable than the hollow boned bipedal t-rex. i'm saying there's a chance not that the elephant sweeps.
                i want you to address this. do you really think a t-rex will charge an elephant head on despite it not being what the rex did against trikes, and that it will not only win but do so with little effort and the only chance the elephant has of maybe fighting back is musth?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                I think a rex would ambush the elephant, who would then promptly turn tail and flee. Again, Elephants are very intelligent, they seem to even have a concept of death... it would 100% turn tail and flee, not attempt to fight back.
                In the hypothetical scenario where it does not flee and attempts to fight back, the advantage still lies with the larger, taller, heavier, more mobile and stronger animal. If the elephant attempts a charge, well it just presented it's neck. Let's say that the rex decides not to attack it's trunk or neck for some unknown reason. The Elephant still has a massive head and neck seperating it from any vital areas it could try to reach with it's tusks. The Rex is also positioned better to move and divert the force of the charge to make another attempt at it's life. Even still, the Rex is capable of simply overpowering the elephant, so it's not like it matters.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                an elephant would probably turn tail unless compelled to stay yeah. but i think the t rex would also not bother if it's an angry bull on musth and ambush him instead. and if the ambush fails he'd get out of there. i'm still not convinced about the 7000kg average so in my head it's 5500 and way more stable vs 6000 and less stable with hollow bones. if the t rex bites the elephant's neck that's a wrap but if the elephant knocks it down i think that's a wrap too. what do you think about average rex vs the biggest african bush elephant?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                If it is two animals of equal weight then it could go either way, but if the rex decided to flee it could do so unopposed as elephants are glacially slow, but the bull would die if it turned tail. I agree with you that a Rex would not openly charge an 8 ton elephant, the rex would ambush it, if the elephant stood its ground the rex would abort, if it stayed and fought it would risk injury or death. It's still a lopsided matchup.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                are you inclined to say the 10,000kg african bush elephant would beat the average rex though?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                I'd say he has a chance. Basically for me, despite the advantages in processing power that an elephant has over the Tyrannosaur's usual prey, this all boils down to Tyrannosaur hunting larger-than-elephant-sized herbivores for a living, and a bush elephant never seeing a predator larger than a Nile Crocodile or lion (I presume they don't see Atlas Bears, I could be wrong, but even if I am, that's still less than 10% of the size of a Tyrannosaur).

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                bro that would be 3000kg heavier than your estimate and 4000kg heavier than mine, considerably taller and your response is "he has a chance"?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                That was another guy.
                I'm a proponent of the idea that size wins. A 10 ton elephant should be able to bully an 8 ton rex, at the very least any power advantage the rex had is lost. This is to say that the elephant has a far easier time escaping any hold.
                I still do not think there is an immediate threat to the rex's life, as it always has the option of retreating, barring some chaotic unintended accident or miscalculation on the predator's part.
                It boils down to the rex hunting edmontosaurus, if it could wrangle that behemoth no exant elephants would be off the table.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                I don’t have an estimate in this thread, but I stand by what I say, because a Tyrannosaur is used to preying on giant herbivores and an elephant has no experience with giant predators. The Tyrannosaur represents a larger out of context problem for the elephant than the elephant represents for a Tyrannosaur.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Re: the bones breaking. just because an animal is built to support its body in one direction doesn't mean the body is able to support even it's own weight if the balance is slightly of, something anyone who has broken their own bones would know. like a ribcage isn't built to support that kind of forces, its just a box where your organs go. a literal elephant standing on it would pop it like a fricking balloon.

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                You go out into the street and fall on your side without using your arms to brace yourself. Your body can support your own weight even at a sprint, right?

              • 9 months ago
                Anonymous

                Does the fight take place on a parking lot now?
                If I fall on my side on the ground/grass/field I would be 100% fine dude, what are you made out of? glass?
                People flop over all the time on the streets too when drunk, most of the time they have no arms to catch themselves. Only bad outcome is if your skull bounce on the concrete.

          • 9 months ago
            Anonymous

            God you are genuinely such a fricking moron.
            >Ahd-hominym!!!!
            Ahd my dick to your mouth you fricking homosexual.

  27. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    4 legs vs 2, the dinosaur would fall.

  28. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    no, because elephants weapons are all for opponents smaller than it, the tusks are pointed down, not up

    • 10 months ago
      Anonymous

      >because elephants weapons are all for opponents smaller than it
      You sure about that?

      • 10 months ago
        Anonymous

        >posts video of elephants of a similar size
        >the smaller one even fricks off because hes smaller

  29. 10 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes
    However an elephant would be completely fricked against a triceratops

    • 9 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not if a group surrounded 1 triceratops

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