Are they still alive?

I found an awareness group for the thylacine and wondered why they aren't able to produce any evidence?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    For a study published last month in the journal Science of the Total Environment, Dr. Brook’s team studied 1,237 Tasmanian tiger reports from 1910 onward. It classified these reports in terms of credibility. More than half of the reports came from the general public. The team also found spikes of sightings that were probably linked to high-profile thylacine news in Australia — what Dr. Brook’s team called “recency bias.”

    Some reports between 1910 and 1937 were of confirmed captures or kills, with the last fully wild photographed kill occurring in 1930. Dr. Brook’s team considered another four reports of kills and captures/releases from 1933-1937 legitimate.
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    For the following eight decades, 26 deaths and 16 captures were reported but not verified, as were 271 reports made by people that Dr. Brook’s team considered experts: former trappers, outdoorsmen, scientists or officials. These types of high-quality reports from experts peaked in the 1930s and started to fall in the 1940s.

    People who had definitely trapped or seen thylacines before the 1930s, and who presumably knew what they were looking at, had either died or retired by the 1970s. “That whole pool of expertise kind of dries up by the 1970s,” Dr. Brook said.

    The best quality report after that, he said, came from a park officer who saw one in 1982. A model based on all these reports reveals Tasmanian tigers likely went extinct between the 1940s and 1970s, with a smaller chance they persisted in remote areas until the 1980s or even the early 2000s.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969723014948?via%3Dihub

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    if they are alive it's better to keep it a secret from the chinese and everybody else.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    there are good thylacine videos
    more than bigfoot videos anyways

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    no, we're extinct, stop looking.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    These are two of the most convincing video footage of the Thylacine. Judge it for yourselves

    Both are filmed in Western Australia. You can see both animals have the weird gait, somewhat of a cripplewalk indicative of marsupial locomotion. It could be they are just two foxes with mange (which cause hair loss) and are both injured, but it seems like the two animals there taken 10 years apart are the same animal.

    Unfortunately, if they aren't gone from mainland Australia now they might just well have. The 2020 wildfire season in Australia is estimated to kill literal billion of animals. I'm kinda hoping that there are some thylacine left in Papua New Guinea jungles.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      If this fucker and be extinct for like 100 years and show up again in New Guinea, it's not impossible for thylacine to do the same

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      So there's currently about as much evidence for thylacines still being alive as there is for bigfoot. I guess that settles it.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I want to believe, but the first video is absolutely not a thylacine. Ankle is far too high up on the hindlegs.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I'm kinda hoping that there are some thylacine left in Papua New Guinea jungles.
      Why would there be any? There has never been thylacine sighting there. Even the locals never seen them. The only evidence we have of Thylacine in New Guinea is a Thylacine fossil from the Holocene, 8500 years ago. They are likely extinct in New Guinea and mainland Australia before European explorers came.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They're around
    See them all the time

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >They're around
      >See them all the time
      Take a photo on your phone! And a video! Make millions of dollars for yourself and help secure the future of this extremely endangered animal!
      Oh, you can't? Because reasons?

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >You saw a dingo, not a tazzy tigger.
    This is what literally everyone above is arguing. Show them video and gait analysis, they say it's a dingo with a condition. Etc. Etc. When we get a dead body, it'll be a hoax, they'll say, because no scientific group will accept it. Having an endangered species on the land will endanger profits, you see.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >tazzy
      >we
      You're not from around here, cobber.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        We being people in general, upside-down-moron.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Oh, OK. So you see humanity as one common collective people. So you consider yourself something of a globalist.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous
            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Wtf

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              I keep screaming but god doesn't hear me.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I doubt it. It's a large, well known mammal, not a shrub or a frog or something like that where a small, isolated population could go unnoticed for a long time.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There's no chance that thylacines still exist.
    There hasn't been a confirmed siting in a century or so.
    And these days everybody has smartphone cameras on them at all times, and we can do DNA on scat, blood, bones, hides, etc. They're just gone.
    And remember, if you think they've survived and will continue survive, there can't just be one or two or three out there. There has to a viable breeding population of perhaps hundreds. And if there were hundred of the things, someone would have caught one on camera by now.
    On the Australian mainland they were almost instantly outcompeted/exterminated by dingoes. Dingoes are just a breed of scrawny Asian domestic dog (Canis familiaris) that Asian fishermen dropped off at the the very top of the Australian continent only a few thousand years ago.
    Those poor little marsupials just couldn't survive dog and man.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I want to believe, but it's very unlikely
    >Extinct for 90 years
    >Not a single skeleton remain, clear photo or video has ever been found
    >Has to compete with all the shit the British introduced like foxes
    >Fairly large animal which shouldn't be too hard to spot
    Australia is very big and not densely populated so there's hope, but I feel like we would have found SOMETHING by now

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I miss that lil bro like you wouldn't believe

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    what killed them? casual research tells me they were already mostly gone by the time yuros arrived

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Mass hunting since farmers blamed them for killing sheep and wanted them gone.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >kills endangered animal
        >poses in front of a camera while intensely staring at its penis
        What is wrong with aussies

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          People up until the 1980s were complete retards about animal conservation.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            No, they were completely right. If it wasn't for eradication programs, we'd have cougars and wolves up our asses.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              you deserve wolves up your ass

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Good

              Fuck ranchers. People in general need to be eating 5x less meat.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >People in general need to be eating 5x less meat.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                Ranchers are fine. Fuck walmart and ebt for making meat available to people who dont deserve it.

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >ranchers are fine but fuck the people ultimately paying their bills

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                >for making meat available to people who dont deserve it.
                wait, which people deserve it?

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Nothing wrong with that. Besides, they mostly eradicated species that could have been good livestock.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Implying I don't want a wolf up my ass~

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                have a nice day

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              And the world would have been that much greater

              • 2 months ago
                Anonymous

                picfail

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Passenger pigeons once numbered in the billions
            >We killed them all anyway
            Humans were ruthless. It's a shame environmentalism didn't come like 100 years sooner

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          look at the nose.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      First Dingos, then people went and finish the job in the only place they remained, Tazmania.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Apparently some Aussie college is reviving them through cloning or some shit

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They're dead, Jim.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Are they still alive?
    I'd like to believe they are, but really no one knows.
    They didn't go extinct that long ago, and its not unheard of for very small isolated populations to outlast their species' announced extinction.
    Most of the evidence ends up being someone who knew someone who thought they saw something in the woods once.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >its not unheard of for very small isolated populations to outlast their species' announced extinction
      Sure, but it's always something small like bugs or frogs. Not a dog-sized marsupial.
      But then again, how many times have you seen a fox or coyote in the woods? Not in the suburbs where they're used to humans, but out in the actual middle of nowhere. They smell you a mile away and disappear accordingly.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I’ve seen coyotes multiple times in the woods camping at night. Their eyes would glare from the fire, they weren’t scared.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >They smell you a mile away
        Not if they're upwind.
        I'm not saying anecdotal evidence is good, but that's pretty much all the tasmanian tiger rumors are.
        I give it more of a pass than bigfoot hunters because its the difference between a magical fantasy, and an animal that went extinct in 1936 and wishful thinking.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >how many times have you seen a fox or coyote in the woods?
        Too many to count, and I've seen wolves at least five times. If thylacines were still alive today we would know.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Well I’ve still seen wolves and coyotes prevalent in United States and considering most urban Australia is on the coasts, that it’s possible they are elusive enough to not be counted for.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >most urban Australia is on the coasts, that it’s possible they are elusive enough to not be counted for.
      Most of non urban australia isn’t habitable by thylacines though

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Idk, probably not. Humans are pretty good at whiping out k9 species. Australians also like to crusade around and kill their wildlife..

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not dogs, marsupials

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You're right, still, they are pretty large and would have to leave evidence of some kind. If they are out there it's probably a small population

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