Are there such biomes on our vast planet?

>Due to the island's volcanic nature and composition of brittle, quick setting igneous glasses and easily-weathered granite, ceaseless rainfall has carved numerous deep cracks, pits, and narrow valleys running towards the ocean. Rains from higher elevations settle in low spots and depressions, warmed by geothermal heat to body temperature and higher, which then collect nearly all biological matter that has entered a state of decomposition. The result is dark soup of decay, a rich ground for an entire niche of invertebrate life, the giant scavengers.

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  1. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tsingsy of Madagascar are the closest we have, I think.

  2. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Urban sewers. The creatures don't reach large proportions in comparison to what you mentioned, but the rats and wienerroaches get way larger and thrive way better than they normally would be able to.

  3. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    I think there's some rule in biology where insects can't get super big because they have exoskeletons, like animals that live out of water can't grow enormous either, hence why the largest animals live in the sea

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      I thought it was because of the way insects oxygenate though hollow tubes all throughout their body that are extremely inefficient and couldn't cope if they were any bigger than what they can get to now

      • 12 months ago
        Anonymous

        No, that's as stupid as saying "dinosaurs couldn't survive today due to lower oxygen levels". Humans, just as an example, have extremely inefficient lungs (I think around 70% of the air in your lungs is old) but are still capable of surviving in lower oxygen environments with acclimation and adaption.
        Exoskeletons are far more of a concern because the bigger you get, the more you weigh, and the slower you are, and at a certain point vertebrates just run circles around you.

        • 12 months ago
          Anonymous

          the huge bugs he's talking about are from the permian, not the mesozoic, and dropping oxygen did have an effect on insect size. giant dragonflies would not even be able to stay airborne in today's atmosphere.

          • 12 months ago
            Anonymous

            >giant dragonflies would not even be able to stay airborne in today's atmosphere
            That would imply a massive drop in air pressure, not a drop in oxygen.

            • 12 months ago
              Anonymous

              what an absoulte fricking moron

              • 12 months ago
                Anonymous

                The moron is you if you think aerodynamics are dependent on oxygen and not the ability of wings to generate thrust by pushing down.
                Do you believe that you swim based on the amount of oxygen dissolved in water as well?

              • 12 months ago
                Anonymous
        • 12 months ago
          Anonymous

          It just might have to do with the joints of the exoskeleton, beyond a certain threshold they just wouldn't be able to support the weight and stress of, say, a mammoth sized scorpion.

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      They were super big before, it’s likely that we don’t have them now because birds fill the ecological niche

      • 12 months ago
        Anonymous

        >They were super big before, it’s likely that we don’t have them now because birds fill the ecological niche
        Correct. Although oxygen levels do correlate with insect size previous to the emergence of birds, once birds appeared, insect size was significantly depressed relative to what was physiologically possible.
        https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.1204026109
        Remove birds, and although we wouldn't get carboniferous-sized insects, they'd soon be significantly larger on average than they are today.

  4. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Deep sea hydrothermal vents are pretty close, just underwater lmao.

  5. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe those caves full of guano that have giant centipedes and spiders

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      > The resulting guano, produced by the mammals, support a rich and very special ecosystem. The wienerroaches occurs here in huge numbers, together with specialized guano beetles, feeding on decaying matter. They are hunted by huge centipedes, spiders and whipscorpions, teeming over the cave walls like in a nightmare
      Nice

      • 12 months ago
        Anonymous

        imagine the smell

      • 12 months ago
        Anonymous

        Imagine how hellish undiscovered parasites must be in those places. Most of the creatures in guano caves are already nightmare fuel.

        • 12 months ago
          Anonymous

          Nah

  6. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    God I wish. I could see a similar situation occurring in deep sea trenches with marine snow, only the pressure might keep the invertebrates from getting excessively large.
    Maybe in a rainforest in one of those huge cenotes, but even then it doesn't seem like there's enough biomatter to make giant bugs.

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      >only the pressure might keep the invertebrates from getting excessively large.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep-sea_gigantism?useskin=vector

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