Why did we domesticate dogs first and not some other animal? Domesticated bear would have been kino.

Why did we domesticate dogs first and not some other animal? Domesticated bear would have been kino.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They used to say dogs got a slippery genome. I don't know if that's a chicken or the egg thing, but it means they have a predisposition to evolving more traits each generation which would help move toward domestication faster. They might still be saying that, I don't know.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wolves are pack hunters, are very intelligent, and likely started associating early human hunter-gathers with an easier source of food by taking on scraps and bits left over. In time, it made constant exposure and transmission to interactions with humans become associated with "safety" and "security".

    >wolf starts following a hunter around
    >share an uneasy bond over mutually sharing food
    >wolf breeds with female wolf, pups are exposed to humans and associate them as kin/friendly
    >cycle continues

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why are wolves considered to be impossible to keep as pets? they clearly were our pets 30,000 years ago

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >why are wolves considered to be impossible to keep as pets? they clearly were our pets 30,000 years ago
      Because they stop accepting new faces after like 6 months and see them as threats or prey. If you lived in a small village with the same five people it would be fine. Some of the land race herding dogs are the same like the Tibetan mastiff.

      Dogs also domestica easily because they have repeating sections of DNA that code for many physical traits, like they may present to be a Chihuahua but they still are carriers of the genes that make Dobermans and a little selective pressure reveals it.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >A-ah, s-senpai! I'm back!
      >Oh yes.
      >W-will you be my friend?
      >Definitely.
      >a-actually i-i-i'm not sure about this a-a-a-are you touching me?
      >Did you know I live in a cave?
      >aaaaaaa....

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Is he trying to eat him or fuck him?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm sure humans and dogs go back to the very inception of humanity themselves. The first time a man gained sapience or whatever and found a baby wolf and took care of it the rest is history. You can't just take care of a baby bear and have it be your best buddy, it'll kill you one day. A human can also take a single wolf in a fight so wolves being subordinate was also a thing, even if you did have a friendly circus bear as part of the tribe you're never gonna be able to control that thing, it's a loose canon.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure goats were thr first domesticated animal

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Dogs self domesticated because they are basically four legged humans. Similar mental processes, similar facial expressions, similar social structure, same niche in the environment. Those that did not ally with us were doomed to go extinct: because same niche.

    Then we fucked them up with breeding

    Everything else is too big to start self domesticating (basically becoming vermin. see: cats, coyotes, foxes) or too alien to us. Like bears and big cats aren’t social and hyenas and lions have a totally different social structure that we can’t instinctively get a feel for.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    we didn't domesticate dogs.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >you wanna fight about it

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah good luck domesticating a bear you fucking retard

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Bears and wolves fuck around with each other sometimes. A bear can kick wolves off a kill. But usually bear comes into the wolfs home and it's made to leave. A domesticated bear could have been pretty formidable kek. Maybe too slow to breed, and too dangerous. Getting into elephant territory where they have been tamed but never really domesticated.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Second domesticated animal after the dog. Why not take the prey with you so you always have some around? And look at that, your mate the dog is pretty good at helping to keep them.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I guess before the breeding as well maybe riding long distances might have fucked them up, I suppose breeding ones that were better at carrying loads first built them for that work

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wolves are social and small enough to control easily. A better question is why wolves were domesticated first vs foxes, hyenas, or coyotes.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Foxes were domesticated in SA but the domesticated breed went extinct

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Wtf that is fascinating. Surprised I never heard of this until now. I guess canines must just be naturally easy to domesticate.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >I guess canines must just be naturally easy to domesticate

          Easy to breed, like all animals that have been domesticated. Other ones you might tame one but might be impossible in one persons lifetime to breed many generations of them. Probably the trickiest that comes to mind there is horses because they're not really ready to be broken in and ridden for a couple of years from birth. But then you get a horse that you might be able to ride for 20 years, and is so useful that people made the initial investment. But that's maybe 10 thousand years later than dogs and in a different environment not while people were struggling to even gather food in the ice age.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Riding horses didn’t even exist at first. That was something that had to be selectively bred for. But horses were good for transportation and bearing loads before that. Not to mention that steppe people used them for meat and leather, on top of their travel utility.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Not to mention that steppe people used them for meat and leather, on top of their travel utility.
              And milk, and they eat grass which is free.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >Riding horses didn’t even exist at first. That was something that had to be selectively bred for

              Just jump on kek. I had a steer I could ride on and I'm pretty sure no one selectively bred it for that. I suppose those first horses were pretty wild, but so is any horse that no one has spent the time training

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              There's every chance they were ridden, just no evidence, you wouldn't see much evidence if they just rode to some extent with a blanket and a bit of rope

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Kind of, the original wild horses were much smaller than the horses you're thinking of today, more akin to the size of ponies. While you can ride a pony (and lets be real people probably tried) they won't be able to actually carry anyone too heavy or for very far. Now they're very strong at pulling and dragging things around so that's what they were initially used for (which is why ancient civs like the egyptians used them to pull chariots instead of riding them). Not until they were selectively bred for larger sizes and strength was riding them more feasible.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        SA?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          south america.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >The South American foxes (Lycalopex), commonly called raposa in Portuguese, or zorro in Spanish, are a genus from South America of the subfamily Caninae. Despite their name, they are not true foxes, but are a unique canid genus more closely related to wolves and jackals than to true foxes

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      you answered your own question

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No I didn't, the other canines largely share traits with wolves that also make them easy to domesticate.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >largely
          You largely share traits with a chimpanzee but chimps aren't posting here.
          Foxes and coyotes don't have the same sort of social heriarchy wolves do and hyenas are too big. Hyenas also aren't canines but whatever.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wolves were the ones originally bold enough to follow cavemen around for scraps, and their hunting style have good synergy to the hunting style of early humans.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/jBoV7OO.jpg

      Why did we domesticate dogs first and not some other animal? Domesticated bear would have been kino.

      This. It's likely that cavemen didn't actively set out to start domesticating dogs, wolves just sort of started to hang out around them, with the more aggressive ones being chased off or killed by said cavemen, naturally only leaving the more amiable. It was at some point later some mad lad decided he should start breeding his favorite wolves together to get an even better wolf. And then you get a dog.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I imagine they started to naturally share kills. Wolves hung around where men had made a kill, got thrown some meat. Maybe started to follow the men. At some stage wolves started sharing their kill with the men as well. They have a natural pack mindset that allowed them to accept men as their own. Before you know it they are effectively hunting together and people realize they are useful to have around for so many reasons.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        dogs probably weren't actively bred with desirable traits in mind until more recently. more likely that they were selected for without much intentional pressure from humans simply through forming a symbiotic relationship with humans. similar to how the domestic cat came to be. it was advantageous to have friendly wolves around for security and assistance in hunting(and as emergency livestock, very common use of dogs in tribal societies). aggressive ones were killed or chased off while cute and friendly ones gained advantages. the dog comes relatively naturally from that relationship, it doesn't need to be intentionally bred.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      humans are kinda like ape wolves, if you think about it

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        A wolf like ape who during the ice age tames and breeds a wolf to help him catch prey and later tame and breed his prey to take it with them, and then tame and breed another one to ride around on and do it faster. And obviously animal husbandry only touches on what we do, but that basic mastery so long ago is already spooky compared to what most other animals we share this planet with can do. There's a reason most wild animals are shit scared of people even when they aren't using much technology

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      [...]
      This. It's likely that cavemen didn't actively set out to start domesticating dogs, wolves just sort of started to hang out around them, with the more aggressive ones being chased off or killed by said cavemen, naturally only leaving the more amiable. It was at some point later some mad lad decided he should start breeding his favorite wolves together to get an even better wolf. And then you get a dog.

      Wolves are one of the few animals that could keep pace with the hunting methods of early humans, and instead of competing with each other over similar niches and hunting strategies those that cooperated were able to out compete those who didn't.

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