Why are NE forests so empty

>go on a hike
>all trees are the same kind
>no animals
>no insects
>maybe one or two songbirds and one woodpecker
>streams completely empty, no frogs, no fish, no bugs
Why are forests here (NE USA) so empty? I grew up in a thirdy world Asia and there were insects everywhere--beetles, grasshoppers, praying mantises, butterflies, dragonflies--and small animals like frogs, toads, and all kinds of birds. Every stream was filled with fish, amphibians, and sometimes crayfish.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    All the fauna has fled the freaks and troonys and Homopotamuses.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Should still be a bit early for you yankees to be seeing critters everywhere but I reckon once it heats up you'll have bugs and birds out the wazoo, just like we do right now.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    pesticides and industrial pollutants, the end

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because you are either lying or walked through a city park

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Boo fricking hoo?

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're around. I saw this little dude in a vernal pool on a hike today in NE USA. There were 4 other newts (juveniles and adults) as well as water beetles and a shit ton of caddisfly larvae. Saw a few garter snakes and frogs too.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >empty
    That's just, like, your *opinion*, man.

    Next, what is latitude?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Some hiking trails have been poisoned too much with anti-tick chemicals that no longer work on the ticks, and that DEET spray.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Lol really? But if it doesn’t work then shouldn’t it fade away after a while?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        They keep spraying anyways.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I attracted every goldfinch in the northeast to my back yard so you won't see any elsewhere.. apologies

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      similar story for me. Pic related was chilling in my backyard the other day.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I grew up in a thirdy world Asia
    I can tell

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm in New Jersey and have rabbits and beavers frequently in my yard, with tadpoles and fish spawning in the slower parts of a shaded stream nearby. Most likely went into a monoculture forest.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Define "the NE USA" cuz where I live, there's a lot of fricking things, especially in the gazillions of streams, rivers and creeks in my area. Philadelphia area, btw. Lotsa fish and amphibians but I've never seen crayfish that I can recall.
      As for land animals, what do you want to see? I get lotsa foxes and minks here but supposedly, we're starting to get fox squirrels again in the area (they were locally extinct for a while; still haven't seen one). Also reptiles. And a huge number of bugs. Down by the bay, I see seals and whales from time to time but that's not in the forest.
      Also, my basement was infested with tadpoles and frogs one summer. Weirdly, now that you mention it, I've never once seen a deer in the forest. Always in meadows or on the street or in people's yards and gardens but never in the woods

      I'm in upstate NY. Moved up here from NYC thinking I'd see a bunch of cool animals but so far just saw one chipmunk and some squirrels all Spring.

      having lived in pittsburgh, New York and new jersey...pgh and nj have weirdass herbaceous and voracious lifeforms crawling out of every crevice and new york is boring as hell in that regard, it is just cold idk. ive seen hummingbirds in pittsburgh, great horned owls, constantly hear nightjars, turkeys all over the place even causing traffic problems (once i was on a bus that hit a flying turkey), and woodchucks up the wazoo...in the entire ny town i grew up in i found one frog once and a turkey ran through my yard once

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    huge swathes of the forests throughout New England and stretching towards the Great Lakes are actually all new growth forests and saw multiple waves of massive disruptions to the native ecologies over the last four centuries

    its way too much to really encapsulate in a single post but the northeast was a patchwork of micro-ecologies, some natural and some managed by natives, and the arrival of European settlers lead to massive changes through widescale logging and the collapse of native populations and their managed regions. by the 1800s much of the northeast had been logged clear and/or turned into farmland before being abandoned for the virgin lands of the West and the decline of the Atlantic timber trade (tied to the collapsed black pine populations). what we see now in New England is a very young rebounding of the types of plants and trees that survived along the fringes of manicured land and managed to grow the fastest and the animals hardy enough to survive in such a nutrient poor young forest

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      pretty much this. there's virtually no old growth forest anywhere in the northeast. hell, very little east of the mississippi.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Good posts. Yeah, the trees in NH look super young, they are also managed in the parts where people actually live in. It is too big to be managed by the existing population, but, you can see some bits here and there getting trimmed down every few years.
      If you explore in certain spots you can find turkey, racoons, and frogs.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I have old growth forest behind my house in NH. It's just land that was never farmed on or developed. Lots of glacial boulders, fallen trees, gaps in the canopy letting in some light so young trees pop up and some cool plants like last year there were a lot of ghost pipes. I can walk about 1/2 mile before it starts looking younger like the land behind what is now a trailer park was probably cleared in the past.

        My back yard used to be bigger, I think they cleared the whole 3 acre lot when my house was first built but now about half of it is regrown as young forest, lots of birch trees, grape vines, and some rhododendron that was probably decorative back in the time it was cleared. I'm trying to cut down the hemlocks that are popping up in that area to keep it younger because that's a good microbiome to have too.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Define "the NE USA" cuz where I live, there's a lot of fricking things, especially in the gazillions of streams, rivers and creeks in my area. Philadelphia area, btw. Lotsa fish and amphibians but I've never seen crayfish that I can recall.
    As for land animals, what do you want to see? I get lotsa foxes and minks here but supposedly, we're starting to get fox squirrels again in the area (they were locally extinct for a while; still haven't seen one). Also reptiles. And a huge number of bugs. Down by the bay, I see seals and whales from time to time but that's not in the forest.
    Also, my basement was infested with tadpoles and frogs one summer. Weirdly, now that you mention it, I've never once seen a deer in the forest. Always in meadows or on the street or in people's yards and gardens but never in the woods

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm in upstate NY. Moved up here from NYC thinking I'd see a bunch of cool animals but so far just saw one chipmunk and some squirrels all Spring.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I've lived upstate my whole life, you're probably seeing shit at its worse since all of our ash trees got obliterated by a funny little beetle.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          How ONE beetle's simple little trick Changed the world forever

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            that would be the second time

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sounds really odd. I was stationed in Watertown for 4 years and saw a shit ton of deer, skunks and opossum all the time. Deer were extremely stupid and would run into barbwire fences and traffic all the time. Also a shit ton of cicadas

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Deer (and lots of other animals) are experts at paying attention to sounds that don't belong in the forest. If you're just walking in there like an average tard its not that strange that you aren't seeing any deer or other animals.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      homie missing the point

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      beyond parody

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >manhattan
      Always funny how new yorkers make excuses on, how their concrete jungle makes their kids grow up tougher, since they can take easily brush off noise and smells.
      Yeah, real tough, cries and pisses uncontrollably touching dirt, or even thinking about a forest

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        moron, do you think somebody from the projects is going to be posting on r/agender?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          lol
          I've lived in cities my entire life, including Manhattan (Yorkville repruhzent!) and still enjoy forests. Go suck a dozen shits.

          don't even bother entertaining the mentally ill rightoids. they see one bad post about a leftist and will apply it to all of them, but if you show them one bad stereotype of a rightoid they will overfill their diapers in anger

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        lol
        I've lived in cities my entire life, including Manhattan (Yorkville repruhzent!) and still enjoy forests. Go suck a dozen shits.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      love how this sped got so excited to post his epic reddit screencap that he didn't even check to see what the thread was actually about

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        when you put it like that it is quite humorous

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You walked through planted monoculture forest

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