What outcompetes Japanese knotweed?

Any way to get rid of this? have had it for a couple of years. 2 years ago I picked every bit I could see, which weakened it significantly, but it was not quite gone. This year I dug up my garden and cut out a lot of the rhizome., but obviously i can never get every part, though it's hopefully weakened significantly again. Anything I can plant now that will outcompete knotweed so that it cannot gain a foothold again?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you could try these bad boys. they spread like a fricking pest when kept unchecked but if you wheck them before they produce seeds they are rather easy to get rid off and they actually look and smell nice

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Is there a Korean knotweed?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's edible if you want to look up recipes on line to fool with before you finally go to town on it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah. I've never had it (because every instance I've seen was in a no-no zone like right next to a road) but apparently the shoots make for good eating.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, can be used as a slightly odd-tasting substitute for rhubarb.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Healthy ecosystems. Intact plant communities rarely have invasive species issues. It's mostly the ones disturbed by humans.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    cut it the frick up and douse boiling water on the roots

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just keep cutting it. No plant, no matter how robust and tough it is, will survive being repeatedly deprived of sunlight via having its leaves and shoots cut off year after year.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Mint or bamboo

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You should try Himalayan blackberry

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You want the true redpill about knotweed? In its native habitat of Japan it is a pioneer species, growing on rocky volcanic slopes. Researchers have noted that over 200 species of insects eat the plant, weakening it enough that bamboo and miscanthus can then outcompete it. So you have this plant adapted to growing in harsh dry conditions and breaking through bedrock, and then you move it to the city where it has nice normal soil and no predators or natural environmental succession to worry about. No shit it gets out of hand.

    In my personal observation I notice knotweed on the edges of rivers growing in the rocks because that mimics their natural habitat. But another thing to note is that I also see it on the edges of woodland but never actually inside the forest in the shade. Like I said, it is a pioneer species and will eventually be surpressed by other plants that shade it out. If it had its natural insect enemies it would lose the upper hand it currently has.

    The take away is that chemicals aren't the solution, biocontrol is, such as Aphalara itadori. But of course we know that the goverment likes wasting money on weedkiller that gives quick results but actually does jackshit in the long run, instead of investing in actual solutions that may take years to establish.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >This year I dug up my garden and cut out a lot of the rhizome., but obviously i can never get every part, though it's hopefully weakened significantly again
    It will eventually succumb. Took me about six years to eradicate and I saw no fresh shoots during the three years since then.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Plant some "Stalin's Revenge" and watch the botany equivalent of the Russo-Japanese war.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The Japanese win?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sir that is Hogweed pictured there. The outcome is likely in its favour as it is one of the most invasive plants in eastern Europe. It borderlines on being an ecological biological weapon as these frickers also secrete nasty ass toxins that can cause some pretty horrid chemical burns. It got the name Stalins Revenge because the Serbs believe it was his final act of hatred towards the balkans by making his malice be made manifest. If you want something which will out compete, if not straight up kill, Hogweed is the commissar to take the knotweed outback to do it. Its that bad of a plant

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I was just pointing out the irony of the war analogy but now you have me interested…

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So say I plant this thing and it kills the Japanese weed, how do I get rid of this afterward?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Lure it into invading a small neighboring garden which you will sustain while it kills off the Russians

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It's greatest nemesis is the hog.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    bamboo? tumbleweed?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      mind you, I'm in europe and I don't want to introduce another invasive species

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Depends on the country, but generally the guideline is to dig 6m wide and 3m deep hole to remove most of the plant or cover the area with a thick canvas for minimum 2 years

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Blackberry?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        giant cane? Arundo donax

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    plow the soil deeply around the plant, to expose the roots as much as possible, then douse the entire area with very salty water, make sure it goes deep in the soil around the roots

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I can't believe I need to say this, but do not salt the earth on your property OP.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah don't worry, I'm just banking on it being weakened to such a degree that I can plant something else that keeps it from gaining a foothold again

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Salt is an EXTREMELY poor choice because it poisons most plants and can ruin the soil for decades or longer. A trail of dead vegetation will also follow it’s roll downhill. Chopping it down to stubs and pouring a couple pots of boiling water over it would be better. Slap some cardboard over the top and pin it down with a few rocks. Check it every once in a while and give any sprouts a good chop with a shovel.

      mind you, I'm in europe and I don't want to introduce another invasive species

      Tumbleweeds are native to the steppe ecosystems of Eastern Eurasia. Assuming a little wind went your way and they were competitive in your area you would probably already see them around. They could potentially invade along disturbed areas like roads or near agriculture, but established meadows and woodland perennial ecosystems would block their wind-propelled seed dispersal and choke their access to light.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    fire

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