They're doing it

they're fucking bringing them back LET'S FUCKING GO

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's no biome around that can yupport Mammoths, where do they intend to keep them? The Pleistocene Park?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    YOUR SCIENTISTS WERE SO CAUGHT UP IN WHETHER OR NOT THEY COULD THEY COULDN'T STOP TO THINK WHETHER OR NOT THEY SHOULD or the rape of the natural world.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      who cares
      at least scientists are cool
      not all but duh
      that said they should probably not keep them in the desert, that's obvious

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    deleted post of truth
    fuck jannies
    at least it's not about someone's opinion though

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes let's go

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No point if we don't get to eat them like our ancestors.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A "startup" is just a guy collecting money from gullible idiots.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So they are thinking about it loudly for the 100th time?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you actually read the mission statement by the company, they're not bringing back mammoths. Sadly, the science isn't there yet, even with totally mummified remains the dna has still decayed due to cosmic rays and microbes.

    They're using CRISPR to gene-edit asian elephants into mammoth-like elephants. Replacing large flappy ears with small ears adapted for cold climates, adding cold- resistant haemoglobin, 12 inch thick hides of fur. And it's already been done.
    The hard part that requires a lot of money and tech is incubating the mammoth embryo to life.

    They're not dropping them in Texas as some sick zoo experience, like Jurassic Park, they're going to be dropped in what's left of Mammoth's original habitat, the mammoth steppe, in Siberia, with hope of restoring that ecosystem to stop the perma-frost from thawing.

    And then once the mammoths are back, alongside musk ox, plains bison to replace giant steppe bison, wild horses, moose, elk and deer, they'll add predators like, wolves, amur tigers, leopards and polar bears/1.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      /2 The predators will be there to corral the herbivores into herds and to keep them moving so they don't just stay in one spot over grazing like livestock.

      So essentially they're building an ecosystem with the biodiversity of the serengeti from the ground up, whilst being twice as large.

      There's even hopes that if the science can catch up, they could introduce cave lions, short-faced bears, steppe-bison, aurochs and even dire wolves.

      It's actually a really beautiful thing imo.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >They're using CRISPR to gene-edit asian elephants into mammoth-like elephants. Replacing large flappy ears with small ears adapted for cold climates, adding cold- resistant haemoglobin, 12 inch thick hides of fur.
      So can we do this shit already with CRISPR? Can we just edit animals and give them different traits, like giving a mouse smaller ears and shaggy hair? If not, starting with fucking elephants as the first project sounds like the most retarded shit

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah we can, the science is already there and it's the easy part. What's difficult is combining the edited genes into a viable embryo, and carrying it to term.

        The best way to carry them to term would be using elephants, asian or african, sadly they're threatened species and no one wants to waste an elephant's long pregnancy time on animals that won't aid in the species' survival.

        So they'd have to develop tech to artificially grow a mammoth embryo for 22 whole months. It's been done before with mice and dolly the sheep, but mice and sheep pregnancies are far shorter.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I think my question isn't if we can, but if we really have done it before. Have we already used something like CRISPR to produce a mouse that looks as different from a normal mouse as a mammoth looks from an elephant?
          Because if not, this seems way too theoretical and still more like a pipedream.
          And like you said, trying this shit with an elephant seems way harder, so why start there?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        while you've got the crisper microwave running could you give me a 13 inch long prehensile penis with a sheathe and a knot?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >They're not dropping them in Texas as some sick zoo experience, like Jurassic Park, they're going to be dropped in what's left of Mammoth's original habitat, the mammoth steppe, in Siberia
      I’m awaiting the inevitable news of them getting killed by Russian peasants.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >most iconic of extinct animals
    they are bringing back dinosaurs?

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I heard the same thing in the 80s. I'll believe it when I see it and if it lives longer than Dolly

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >no one linking the company
    https://colossal.com/

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're not, because it's impossible. DNA isn't everything. You need the cellular environment. An elephant cell is not enough.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >asian elephant with some genes to grow more hair
    this is not a mammoth, this is a fucking chud elephant

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      chud isn't the new gay
      it's pretty specific
      you should use the dictionary

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      it's ma'amoth, you bigot

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >2037
    >4am
    >Getting a decents night sleep before work
    >THOOM THOOM THOOM
    >Wake up to plates fall out of kitchen cabinets
    >THOOM THOOM THOOM
    >cats freaking out
    >ROOOOOOAAAAHHHHHWWWWWW
    >Look out window
    >Mfw it's a fucking wooly mammoth again
    >Thanks science

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Flash news report of a mammoth stampede down a major highway. We asked for this.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's just a waste of money bringing something back to a world it literally wasn't made for. We have elephants.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not necessarily. This research is important to potentially bring back animals that are going extinct faster than we can reverse climate change.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You don't see how this could open the door for all de extinction efforts? After the mammoth, then the passenger pigoen, the carolina parakeet, the steppe bison, the aurochs, cave lions, and other animals we made go extinct.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Doesn't it end up as a half elephant mutt though?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      56% mammoth, to be exact.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        So it's more like a wooly elephant. Great job. And who's paying for this?

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Texas
    >start-up
    They wont get anything done

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    koreans are already far more advanced in their mammoth cloning project than texoids could ever hope

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >the most iconic of extinct animals
    That's not a T-rex retard

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    good luck making them survive when their natural habitat and food fields dont exist anymore

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    a man moth?!

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The hubris of man. What could go wrong? Scientists really are fucking retards, no one should respect these money hungry worms.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >What could go wrong
      nothing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What could go wrong? Jurassic park with mammoths? It's a harmless exercise.

      Also, "the hubris of man" has given of lots of wonderful things. Like control of fire.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        the cultivation of fire and its consequences have been a disaster for the human race

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Oh yeah, I hate nutrition and not freezing to death.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        the entire scientific community worldwide should be working together exclusively to try and undo as much as possible the destruction humans caused on earth, anything else is stupid

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's easy. Less, more intelligent humans. Quality over quantity.
          Sterilize anyone with an IQ below 100. Strain on resources over, no more idiots letting corporations get away with mass pollution.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Practically impossible but I came up with an alternative: let's put a substance that causes infertility in all fast food

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >sterilize all college students and scientists
              >world of upper lower class midwits that need hellofresh to survive ensues

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >all scientists eat fast food

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Yeah we do. Do you know how much most of us work and how little we get paid or do you think we all have private islands with laser cannons protecting the hidden hangars for our personal flying saucers

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              That doesn't stop the Africans from multiplying like vermin.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              not every dumbass eats fast food, plenty cook
              and besides the point, it wouldn't work until after automation in which point it would be pointless unless you're aimin to solve overpopulation without cutting foreign aid; basically positive eugenics would be a lot more beneficial

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Our testosterone is already plummeting and we're having much fewer kids than we used to in the past.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That's what they're trying to do retard. Bring back an animal humans played a large role in exterminating.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    are you too lazy to use a search engine

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What's more efficient, OP posting the link or 45 different posters having to manually look it up?

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ah can't wait for some old fucking virus to kill us all. How would it be called though

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Humans are well overdue to have a virus wipe us out. Covid was just the harbinger for things to come.

      We're growing way too dependent on anti biotics and vaccines, and seeing as we are the most dominant life form it isn't too far fetched to believe that a super virus will evolve in the next hundred years to wipe us out.

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >inb4 as a side product there will be some stone agevirus and everyone will get fucked

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I had a tabletop setting like this where glyptodons ended up having mega leprosy. Was fun.

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Idk how mammoths would fit in with nature given all that's changed and how long they've been gone.
    Would love to see something like the Carolina Parakeet brought back though. Or giant flocks of passenger pigeons

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why would anyone do this? If they want to revive something, they should bring back the passenger pigeon or Steller’s sea cow, not prehistoric bullshit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Stellar's Sea Cow was on it's last (metaphoric) legs when found by Stellar's expedition. With how easy it is to hunt, how easy it would probably die to modern ship and propeller strikes, and how the fragile kelp ecosystems it depends on have probably adapted to its absence, it could probably only live in captivity.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Also there might not exist a big enough womb

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      but that wouldnt get the SCIENCE XDD investors

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What kind of arbitrary distinction is that? Mammoths didn't even go extinct that long ago in the grand scheme of things. Why not revive the most popular animal?

      but that wouldnt get the SCIENCE XDD investors

      This but they're right

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Because it’s fucking stupid.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nobody has ever cloned a bird, or an extinct species.

      we don't know how to bring back either of those animals. We don't know how to bring back mammoths either, but I'd guess they'll just change a couple genes of an elephant and call it a mammoth.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        We can make a mammoth gene egg and cross it with an elephant, then it's a matter of breeding the mammoth genetic expressions back in over time.
        Elephants breed slowly though, so it'll take a while.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          There is no reason to do something like that.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            There's no reason to make music, but we still do it a lot. Mammoths are cool, simple as.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Mammoths are gay and so are you.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            it will increase the gene pool for asian elephants
            the cats, elephants, rhinos etc. all have tiny pools and it puts them at greater risk
            we can't fuck with the apes because muh humanity
            some people might say to jsut let nature take its course but then how many decent predators are left to regulate the herds?
            places with no predators are also a greater risk of collapses

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It appears there is a lot more work to do, if it's even possible with our technology (see below) Breeding these genes in/out will take thousands of years. What kind of animals will be around then?
          >Several genetic engineering projects aimed at de-extinction of the woolly mammoth are currently ongoing (Shapiro, 2017). These are based on editing the genomes of living cells from Asian elephants, using for example CRISPR-Cas9 technology (Shapiro, 2017). Our results demonstrate that, should genome engineering be applied to extant elephants in order to recreate a woolly mammoth, a remarkable number of deletion and indel variants would have to be included in the editing process. We show that several genes with potentially important functions have been affected by these variants and it is likely that these genes would have consequences for the resulting biology of a resurrected “woolly mammoth”. Functional genetic pathways involved in fat distributions, fur growth, skeletal morphology, and behavior, are potentially critical to surviving in its natural or natural-like environment. Therefore, not including such genome edits could potentially preclude reintroduction and survival of a resurrected woolly mammoth in its natural habitat.
          >https://www.cell.com/iscience/fulltext/S2589-0042(22)01098-7

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why can't we do both. Also passenger pigeon de extinction is actually well under way itself and there's a plan to reintroduce them.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      but that wouldnt get the SCIENCE XDD investors

      there is already a project dedicated to bringing back the passenger pigeon

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hasn't Jurassic Park taught them anywhere?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      *anything

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Its okay, they’re megafauna. You can just kill them all if they start bothering you

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >the most iconic of extinct animals

    They're reviving the T-REX?

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    how tf are woolly mammoths going to survive texas heat

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      they'll shear em

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      mammoths lived clear down through mexico and into central america

      texas is well within its native range.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Texas had a cooler climate back then

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Texas had a cooler climate back then
          no it didn't, but don't bother learning stuff.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >As Texas’ climate changed at the end of the Ice Age about 7,000 years ago, inhabitants adapted. Apparently the state experienced an extended period of warming and drying, and the population during the Archaic period increased.

            >https://www.texasalmanac.com/articles/prehistoric-texas

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >https://texasbeyondhistory.net/trans-p/prehistory/images/climate.html

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >As ice age animals became extinct and the climate began to change, the lifestyles of people living in Texas evolved.

                >https://texasourtexas.texaspbs.org/the-eras-of-texas/the-land-and-its-early-people/

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >Toward the end of the Paleoindian period, the climate began to warm. Archaeological evidence suggests people began to expand their resource base and processing techniques, focusing more on hunting smaller game, such as deer, turkey, and rabbit.
                >https://www.sanantonio.gov/Mission-Trails/Prehistory-History/Prehistory-of-SA/Paleoindian-Period

                IDK seems like my education on the topic is not too bad...

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                For everyone else itt, I think this pic demonstrates an issue beyond temperature, namely the types of vegetation available. Will there be enough plant matter to support herds of mammoth? Maybe over a smaller range?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Says nothing about temperature.

              Also doesn't explain mammoths in Mexican and Central American deserts.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >warming
                I've provided three sources that explicitly mention warming ~7k YA. You didn't even respond to the one source I provided that merely implied warming. No, you clicked on one that specifically said "warming" and claimed there was no discussion of temperature. You're simply wasting our time. Go ahead and believe what you want, IDGAF.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        wish we'd find a way to bring back mastadon instead since they actually are browsers and not grazers. herds of pacific mastadon would be great for the environment out here in Nor Cal since they would help open upon the forests.

        Weren't those Columbian mammoths, not Woolly Mammoths? Columbian mammoths were basically just African Elephant sized Indian Elephants. Plus, we have DNA of Wolly Mammoths not of Columbian mammoths.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If you read the article you'd see they don't actually plan on bringing mammoths back to texas, that would be retarded.

      They plan on collaborating with Pleistocene park in an attempt to return them to their original ecosystem, the mammoth steppe, in an effort to combat climate change and restore the siberian ecosystem.

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Texas-start up

    Libtards BTFO yet again

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Libtards BTFO yet again
      kek
      you understand the instant Texass advertised its low taxes to corporate murrica, they got bought out by libs, right?

      that's our next California right there.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        whatever, as long as they can decide whether they want to be libertarian or authortarian. that shit is giving me whiplash
        >verification not required.

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >most iconic
    That's not a picture of a tyrannosaurus rex

  34. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I wish it was possible for some schizo scientist to revive a ton of Mosasaurus or some ancient ocean monster and let them lose without telling anyone. Would be hilarious to watch the news about monsters terrorizing the oceans and proving Loch Ness schizos right.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In the future I imagine we'll be able to make replicas of them out of monitors.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Oh and don't forget, monitors are capable of parthenogenesis. So even one specimen can become a bunch if (when!) they ever escape.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How is it not possible already? They can 3d print meat right you can 3d print these things and let them loose.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        only life begets life

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        We dont have their DNA and we need existing DNA to create similar creatures, splicing genes and playing god is still a very difficult process, specially if you want to make a new creature from scratch. I can imagine

        In the future I imagine we'll be able to make replicas of them out of monitors.

        this anons suggestion, Monitors are savages, if you converted them into massive aquatic creatures, they would be insanely dangerous for humans, as they can easily hide under the ocean and stay hidden if humans want to retaliate and hunt them all after many die to attacks, releasing a giant one in Loch ness would definitely provide infinite lulz

        Also, that same scientist needs to revive gigantopithecus and release him in a random Northwest forest, watch Bigfoot schizos proven right

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          bigfoot is real, just cause you dont hang in the woods at night don't make him not real. I don't camp much anymore cause of what I've seen.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not that anon, but I'd love to hear the stories about your encounters with them

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Sasquatch is real.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            samsquantch

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >suits cant skew the apparent proportions
            Looks like a fat guy in a suit with poorly articulated ankles.

          • 1 month ago
            noko

            samsquantch

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They'd go extinct again within 3 generations.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah, sure. Mosasaurs doesn't care about being flipped on their back like sharks and they aren't inoffensive like whales. A mosasaur would completely destroy a pod of type A killer whales, they weren't supposed to go extinct they were the perfect marine predators, in the same way as tyrannosaurus is the perfect land predator.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Reintroduction of such an animal in the wild is highly irresponsible. Wild Animals that can potentially disrupt balance in the ecosystems should not be introduced in the wild.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            BORING AS FUCK
            introducing a meteor or a volcano or whatever the fuck was highly irresponsible.
            bring them back

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            This happens all the time naturally. Things change, species can't adapt and die. Why would a man-made change be any different?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              why would you intentionally rock the boat for no benefit?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >would completely destroy a pod of type A killer whales
          Could it? Yes. Would it? Fuck no. No predator is going to stick around and risk getting hurt, especially when it's outnumbered. Orcas, as the Aryans of the sea, would quickly figure this out and start ganging up on them and potentially even start disrupting their hunts.

          that's why orcas have eradicated other whales and sharks, right?

          Why would they eradicate their food sources? Remember, these are the Aryans of the sea we're talking about.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No they wouldn't lol. You clearly don't understand how inhospitable our world is to mosasaurs anymore.

          >Our planet is a lot cooler, therefore a cold blooded marine reptile in the ocean could potentially freeze to death.
          >Mosasaurs primary prey animals, ammonites, plesiosaurs and large sea turtles are all extinct. The prey that's present now is far too agile and small to sustain such large animals.
          >They were also solitary animals, a pod of orca had been recored to hunt animals as large as blue whales, so a solitary animal half the size of one would pose a non-existent threat to them.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          they would have a range that was limited to the tropics dude. Mosasaurs were from a much warmer world and hunted very different prey. I love Mosasaurs, but unless they end up having an extremely venomous bite like other members of Toxicofera, they are absolutely fucked in a battle against a pod of orcas.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >they were the perfect marine predators, in the same way as tyrannosaurus is the perfect land predator.
          kek

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        that's why orcas have eradicated other whales and sharks, right?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          well I'm not seeing any large shark species

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Sharks are no longer the primary predators of the ocean anymore and even the largest species will run away at the slightest whiff of orca.

          Most whales are of a similar size and live in pods, so hunting them is very difficult.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      moray eels are basically small fish version of mosasaurs. If you made a giant moray eel and gave it flippers and scales it would be a mosasaur

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Genetically modify a water monitor to 12m and with fins.

  35. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    theyre bringing back dodos?

  36. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      even the chinese wolves have chinky eyes

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Check out the monkeys over there that are rare. I forget the name, they live in the DBZ mountain area. They also look like chinks. What's up wit that? Aliens created chinks from the animals around them?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          in the 19th century they thought that whites evolved from chimps, chinese evolved from monkeys and blacks evolved from gorillas

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            From what did Indians evolved from?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Pongos

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              dung beetles

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Murica here, our indians evolved from mixing red clay and booze.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              [Spoiler] Poo [/Spoiler]

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            No they didn't.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >source: my ass

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                your source is a crack pipe

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Nah, the miscellaneous races are descended from the 10 lost tribes of isreal, including the peoples of tartary.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Stop garden gnome posting, also it's israel

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >we waz garden gnomez

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous
            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >implying toasters aren’t a higher form of life than Poles

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                It's implying that they are

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It’s the dry cold winds of the steppe that cause that face

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          that's called evolution. Environment influences its population over generations thanks to natural selections. It's not so surprising that primates living in the same area would develop similar traits.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          its almost like living beings are shaped by the environment and not the pre planned

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous
  37. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They keep saying that but so far they've been lying, at least when it comes to the time it takes

  38. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    X

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Two more weeks.

      >X
      Lurk a year before posting newfag.

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