T-rex bros...

Allosauroids:
>a whole clade of apex predators
>active hunters for prey larger than themselves (for the largest animals in the Earth history)
>highly kinetic jaws capable of opening more than to 90 degrees
>razor-sharp teeth with serrated edges
>cool charismatic skulls with horns and crests
>developed forelimbs with prehensile claws
>classic "toxic masculine" dragons covered with scales
>light and openwork skull, yet capable of withstanding monstrous blows against the carcasses of sauropods
>often coexisted with other giant theropods, but everywhere epicly and violently ousted everyone in the evolutionary race
>reigned supreme over megafauna until their very extinction, keeping tyrannosaurids under their feet
>spawned the largest land predators the Earth has ever known

Tyrannosaurids:
>a group of mostly middle-sized theropods that grew to bigger sizes only at the very end of their evolution and with the absence of competitors
>obligate hunters for prey smaller than themselves, equally or even more often vultures that just sniffed out corpses
>limited jaws kinetism
>blunt peg-shaped teeth designed to crush the bones of decaying carcasses
>boring generic theropod skulls (the only species with semi-binocular eyesight ironically had poor vision)
>comically funny rudimentary forelimbs that have become the source for memes
>some species were covered with fluffy feather-like structures like cute goslings
>skulls are less impact-resistant than those of allosauroids (even in species with massive heads) as they are designed for smaller or dead targets
>grown into apex predators literally in greenhouse conditions without competition
>could not reach this niche while allosauroids were still around
>"largest predators ever" only for normeis who studied paleontology with Hollywood movies

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Allosauroids:
    >>a whole clade of apex predators
    hunters for prey larger than themselves (for the largest animals in the Earth history)
    kinetic jaws capable of opening more than to 90 degrees
    -sharp teeth with serrated edges
    >>cool charismatic skulls with horns and crests
    forelimbs with prehensile claws
    "toxic masculine" dragons covered with scales
    and openwork skull, yet capable of withstanding monstrous blows against the carcasses of sauropods
    coexisted with other giant theropods, but everywhere epicly and violently ousted everyone in the evolutionary race
    supreme over megafauna until their very extinction, keeping tyrannosaurids under their feet
    the largest land predators the Earth has ever known

    >Tyrannosaurids:
    >>a group of mostly middle-sized theropods that grew to bigger sizes only at the very end of their evolution and with the absence of competitors
    hunters for prey smaller than themselves, equally or even more often vultures that just sniffed out corpses
    jaws kinetism
    peg-shaped teeth designed to crush the bones of decaying carcasses
    generic theropod skulls (the only species with semi-binocular eyesight ironically had poor vision)
    funny rudimentary forelimbs that have become the source for memes
    >>some species were covered with fluffy feather-like structures like cute goslings
    are less impact-resistant than those of allosauroids (even in species with massive heads) as they are designed for smaller or dead targets
    into apex predators literally in greenhouse conditions without competition
    not reach this niche while allosauroids were still around
    >>"largest predators ever" only for normeis who studied paleontology with Hollywood movies

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >(for the largest animals in the Earth history)
    They didn't overlap with whales.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      He probably meant precisely terrestrial animals.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      He probably meant precisely terrestrial animals.

      don't matter since there's evidence of Allosaurus actively preying on 2 species of dinosaur and neither one is anywhere close to sauropod size.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        What 2 species?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >meoooooooooooowwww!!!!!!

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      so what actually happens is if a claw or tooth penetrates to bone you get an infected lesion. The bone grows around the bacteria from the tooth or claw forming what we call an ossification.

      this lump of bone, the ossification, is evidence of an infection of the bone. We do in fact have evidence of ossified lesions in the feet of Allosaurus, such as big al. We have 0 evidence of ossified lesions in the faces and necks of any Allosaurus despite literally hundreds of skulls being found.

      such lesions are common in tyrannosaurids, but absent in allosaurids. Indicating that such encounters probably never happened. It's fun art, but pure bullshit otherwise.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Interesting thought. But I think (may be wrong) it is unlikely that the Allosaurus could actually bite through the bone. Carnosaurian teeth are too thin and fragile for that. They're meat-slashers not bone-crushers.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >you have to bite THROUGH bone to cause infection

          protip- a scratch that touches bone will cause bone infection.
          paleontologists have medical training. Hell, we teach doctors and surgeons.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            A friend of a friend of mine once pierced his forehead with a staple gun (intentionally). The staple stuck right into the bone. He just pulled it out and sealed it with a patch. He never had any infection.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >He never had any infection.
              yes, it can happen

              never seemed to happen with tyrannosaurids though.

              https://i.imgur.com/vhaDy4D.jpg

              if that were true tyrannosaurids would absolutely have evolved face armor

              they bit each other on the face so often we rarely find a tyrannosaur skull WITHOUT signs of infection.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          also if you want examples of Allosaurus biting THROUGH bone I can happily provide them.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >inb4 allosaurus had a keratinized face to protect itself from the majority of the biting and preventing those exact infections precisely because they mauled the shit out of each others face so often they needed armour to prevent that sort of thing like komodo dragons with their osteoderms

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          if that were true tyrannosaurids would absolutely have evolved face armor

          they bit each other on the face so often we rarely find a tyrannosaur skull WITHOUT signs of infection.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'm mainly joking. It's probably still fine to depict them doing

            https://i.imgur.com/yaa7iYR.jpg

            >meoooooooooooowwww!!!!!!

            seeing as even if it weren't common it probably happened in a particularly intense fight

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >even if it weren't common it probably happened in a particularly intense fight
              there's no evidence of Allosaurus ever fighting each other despite them being by far the most common theropod in morrison faunas.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                I once read somewhere that the skeletons of allosaurs have a lot of damage signs from other allosaurs (the article was about their "pack" behavior). I will not provide you with a link to the article, since I do not even remember the title.

                I guess its also possible they just engaged in less extreme combat if they were at least semi social and more often just squabbled, or were just less territorial in general

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >or were just less territorial in general
                they certainly seemed to be.
                tyrannosaurids bit each other constantly
                Allosaurus not so much.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Aren't you the one always saying we don't know anything about dinosaur behavior so it's okay to depict them doing anything we want (a la Prehistoric Planet)?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                different person I think

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >or were just less territorial in general
                they certainly seemed to be.
                tyrannosaurids bit each other constantly
                Allosaurus not so much.

                >semi social
                At best, like modern crocodilians - they could tolerate each other during a joint hunt for big prey. But allosauroids definitely had some sprouts of demonstrative behavior, otherwise why would they need ornamentation of skulls?

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >At best, like modern crocodilians
                the croc territoriality spectrum that was posted in another thread makes me wonder how much that tolerance could vary

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >otherwise why would they need ornamentation of skulls?
                breeding mostly. They shared their land with at least 2 other giant theropods that would eat them when they tried to fuck.

                >At best, like modern crocodilians
                the croc territoriality spectrum that was posted in another thread makes me wonder how much that tolerance could vary

                >the croc territoriality spectrum that was posted in another thread makes me wonder how much that tolerance could vary
                you and every other Morrison paleontologist

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              I once read somewhere that the skeletons of allosaurs have a lot of damage signs from other allosaurs (the article was about their "pack" behavior). I will not provide you with a link to the article, since I do not even remember the title.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                >I once read somewhere that the skeletons of allosaurs have a lot of damage signs from other allosaurs
                I've examined the skeletons of about 500 individual Allosaurus and never seen evidence of conspecific agonism.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Who's this? Google search says it's sinraptor. So, what it has to do with tyrannosaurids?

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >So, what it has to do with tyrannosaurids?
              keep searching, the title of the paper will tell you

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              >So, what it has to do with tyrannosaurids?
              keep searching, the title of the paper will tell you

              https://www.researchgate.net/publication/40662860_Head-biting_behavior_in_theropod_dinosaurs_Paleopathological_evidence

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Thanks.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    omnomnom

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >all those fucking feathers
      >allosaurus skin has been described and is like that of basketball leather

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Dude, that's a mega raptor.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          my point stands

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I agreed

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Dude, that's a mega raptor.

        But yea, probably wasn't feathery.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          This --->

          [...]


          Megaraptorid feathers become more or less likely depending on where you put them on the theropod family tree so its kinda hard to tell
          We still do not know for sure whether they were a branch of carcharodontosaurids or basal coelurosaurs (too much convergent evolution and features of both groups). But even in the second case, the presence of feathers is not at all necessary.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >We still do not know for sure whether they were a branch of carcharodontosaurids or basal coelurosaurs
            or both
            or neither

            one of the biggest mistakes the paleo-fools of Wauf make is thinking we know most of what's out there already.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I guess if feathers were ever appropriate it'd be one a Australovenator seeing as it was so far south

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        [...]
        But yea, probably wasn't feathery.

        Megaraptorid feathers become more or less likely depending on where you put them on the theropod family tree so its kinda hard to tell

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >classic "toxic masculine" dragons covered with scales
    Ah, I see. This thread was made by someone who is angry a gay made a video on how T-rex is the straight man's choice and not Allosaurus... Any, get ready for this thread to be an off topic "paleo schizo" battleground.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >T-rex is the straight man's choice and not Allosaurus
      Get a dinosaur with some real chest hair anon

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >body so round no theropod can get its jaws around it
        >limbs and neck short and stubby, cucking the lanklet jaws of theropods
        >only part that can be bitten is a hammer of death, more likely to take the attacker's jaw off
        oh no no no therobros we got too cocky

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >a gay made a video on how T-rex is the straight man's choice and not Allosaurus
      Are you talking about that

      [...]

      video, or did I miss something?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yes that what I was talking about. If that's why you did it, don't let a fag tell you what therapod is based and masculine, and if it's not, my mistake.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >half the megatheropods are carcharodontosaurids
    >Meraxes gigas might also crack the 5 tonne barrier

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you forgot "sexiest feet" under allosauroids

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I wish the feds would track down and kill bestiality and furgay retards instead of constantly blowing up elementary schools.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Hard to tell. In general, the feet of carnosaurs and most coelurosaurs were +/- the same.

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