Synapsids & Mesozoic mammals

>Fascinated by mammal evolution
>Get pic related hoping to learn more
>Author shoehorns in identity politics every fucking opportunity she gets in the Introduction and Chapters 1 and 2; everything has to be about white/European men and how bad they are
I made it 17 pages into Chapter 2 and she decried white/European men 7 times (I kept track) in that chapter alone before I just fucking dropped it.

Does anyone have better comprehensive works regarding the origin of mammals that are still accessible to people who didn't major in the field?
Also general synapsid and Mesozoic mammal thread.

  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    How about:
    History of Terrestrial Mammals in South America: How South American Mammalian Fauna Changed from the Mesozoic to Recent Times

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Or:
      Early Evolutionary History of the Synapsida

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Was checking this out. Might give it a go after I get to Forerunners of Mammals.

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Author shoehorns in identity politics every fucking opportunity she gets

    Hate, or the Dark Side, is fuel for the Force. A burning hatred that drives you to work to the bone, a kill mission.

    I am ready to die.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Don't hurt yourself anon

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    What seperates mammal like reptiles from plain old mammals? Is it the nipples?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Mammal like reptiles is an outdated term.
      Synapsids evolved from amniotes completely separately from reptiles.

      Get help, gay

      Get help, gay

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Sauropsida are part of Amniota, though?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          They're part of it because it came earlier; synapsids are also part of amniota.
          Amniotes split between sauropsids and synapsids; ie synapsids derived from base amniotes and not sauropsids (reptiles)
          Reptiles, ie sauropsids, came after amniotes.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Women and especially white women are mentally ill, thats all

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    How affectionate do you think synapsids would be?
    It feels like, with the exceptions of certain species of birds, mammals are the only animals to really show affection in a similar way to human love, and interestingly even mpnotremes like the platypus will show affection and snuggle with their handlers.
    Thus, how early did this develop? Could you have a loyal or affectionate gorgonopsid?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Get help, gay

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I just finished pic related and it's pretty good OP. Maybe you'll like it better.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you for the recommendation, but it seems to be centered on the Cenozoic rather than the Mesozoic.
      I'm very interested in stem-mammals and synapsids, as well as the monotrome, marsupial and placental split.
      I got pic related but haven't started it yet.

      For Cenozoic stuff I'm namely interested in the evolution of Mustelinae and Ictonychines (I have two ferrets), which there's very little focusing on. I've downloaded the following articles to start,
      >Evolutionary shifts in extant mustelid (Mustelidae Carnivora) cranial shape, body size and body shape coincide with the Mid-Miocene Climate Transition
      >Lineage diversity and size disparity in Musteloidea testing patterns of adaptive radiation using molecular and fossil-based methods
      >Multigene phylogeny of the Mustelidae Resolving relationships, tempo and biogeographic history of a mammalian adaptive radiation
      >Shared extremes by ectotherms and endotherms body elongation in mustelids is associated with small size and reduced limbs
      >The earliest known fisher (Mustelidae), a new species from the Rattlesnake Formation of Oregon
      >The earliest mustelid in North America
      >The Genera Trochictis, Enhydrictis, and Trocharion, with Remarks on the Taxonomy of the Mustelidae
      However it's worth noting I'm an autodidact, so scientific articles can be admittedly difficult for me to grasp at times. Books will typically (and thankfully) preface more advanced topics with layman's terms. However obviously this topic would be too niche to get a dedicated book on.

      Any other recommendations would be greatly appreciated, of course.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        You should try “In Search of Early Mammals” that is also from the Indiana university press life of the past series. It’s a collection of essays but some are good. There really isn’t much out there about Mesozoic mammals and even less for a general reader or layman on synapsids. Someone already mentioned Michael Brussate’s new book, I haven’t read it but it looks very good. His dinosaur one was excellent.
        For cenozoic mammals there is obviously a lot more, Donald Prothero did a nice one with a good overview and plenty of detail called “After the Dinosaurs”.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >You should try “In Search of Early Mammals” that is also from the Indiana university press life of the past series. It’s a collection of essays but some are good.
          >Someone already mentioned Michael Brussate’s new book, I haven’t read it but it looks very good. His dinosaur one was excellent.
          Thank you very much; will check these out, too!

          >There really isn’t much out there about Mesozoic mammals and even less for a general reader or layman on synapsids.
          What a shame that is. You'd think bear-sized and bizarre looking stem-mammals ruling the Earth before dinosaurs would find more interest in the public sphere. The gorgonopsid in Primeval and Walking With Monsters certainly seemed to.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes I agree. I grew up in South Africa and loved the synapsid collections at the South African Museum in Cape Town as a kid. Have seen some pretty cool synapsids at the Orlov Paleontological Museum in Moscow and the AMNH has a nice selection too, but dinos + woolly mammoths are the big ticket items with the public.

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is this one of those anti-meat eating things? Meat is natural.

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Does she not realize she’s white?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      She got rejected by some blue-eyed blond Chad and now resents her whole race for it, probs

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Nostalgia.

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.sci.news/paleontology/brasilodon-earliest-mammal-11171.html
    >"Comparative studies with recent mammal dentitions and tooth replacement modes suggest that Brasilodon was a placental, relatively short-lived animal"
    >placental mammal
    >225mya
    Massive news if true.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >fucking triassic
      muh ancestor

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Read the abstract and it mentions that this early mammal likely had placentation and other traits associated with live birth, which would make it a Therian. But lots of livebearing animals have placenta, including marsupials, and even some livebearing reptiles and fish. I think the article misinterpreted or misrepresented this mammal with a placenta as a taxonomically placental mammal. Still, if I understand this right, this probably puts this mammal after the split between monotremes and the rest of the mammals, which is neat.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Read the abstract
        Yeah, shame it's paywalled. How long does sci-hub usually take on these things, again?
        >this probably puts this mammal after the split between monotremes and the rest of the mammals, which is neat.
        Definitely still neat. To my understanding marsupials were previously thought to have split during the Jurassic rather than Triassic.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Mammal chads stay winning.

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Dunno if this is the proper thread, but did amniotes evolve from amphibians? Like actual amphibians like temnospondyls and frogs and stuff

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      yes, evolution goes from worm->cartilaginous fish->amphibian->amniotes

  12. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >buying books by female authors

    lol

  13. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Nice to know I'm not alone in hating this woman for shitting up a fascinating subject with idpol.

  14. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    this bitch looks old as fuck for having spacers in her ear

  15. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    What did you expect? That's not a real scientific publication.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Those are hard to find anywhere these days.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >That's not a real scientific publication.
      kek'd

      books are "real" scientific publications.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >books are "real" scientific publications
        No, not everything you write has scientific value.
        There are defined guidelines for a paper to be considered a scientific journal. Popsci books don't fit the requirements.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Popsci books don't fit the requirements.
          they do if they contain peer refereed science

          which millions of books do

          that's one reason you suckers are always behind on science. A shitload of it is published in books.
          Most of those books are then required for college courses offered by the authors, and cost several hundred dollars each.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >that's one reason you suckers are always behind on science. A shitload of it is published in books.
            this retard doesnt know you can google all studies ever published and thinks he's a scholar because he reads shitty opinion pieces in print

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >they do if they contain peer refereed science

            >which millions of books do
            Damn, millions of books out of billions, thats truly significant and means books = science

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Popsci books don't fit the requirements.
          they do if they contain peer refereed science

          which millions of books do

          that's one reason you suckers are always behind on science. A shitload of it is published in books.
          Most of those books are then required for college courses offered by the authors, and cost several hundred dollars each.

          in fact many of the books that Wauf has posted about over the years in paleo threads are college text books containing actual science.

          you guys don't know this and that's a funny thing.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >There are defined guidelines for a paper to be considered a scientific journal
          yes, if I write a bit of science on 450 cocktail napkins and distribute them to 450 different scientists at a drunken orgy that counts as a scientific publication.

          in fact if I just speak my science in a lecture to a crowd of people of the right size and then hand them all notes from the lecture that is also publication.

          in fact you have no idea what publication is and think it requires a journal. Which immediately identifies you as someone that knows absolutely shit about science.
          and that's fine, but you're trying to teach actual experts itt about things you obviously don't know anything about.

  16. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    It probably brought up an animal that was hunted to extinction and triggered op.

    Maybe not that, exactly, but there's a reason they're not citing examples.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Of course it brings up animals that are hunted to extinction, thats literally what the book is about. Are you fucking dense

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Primitive Synapsids
        >Hunted to extinction
        Darn those Permian human hunters making all the Dimetrodons and such extinct

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        That’s not what it’s about at all, it’s about early Synapsids. Are you fucking dense?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          If you think I know what that book or dumb bitch author is you're sorely mistaken, I simply misinterpreted from context that this is what the book is about. The fact that it's about a time period far before humans makes it even more egregious she's on a crusade against white europeans in the book

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            They’re literally on the cover of the book

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >but there's a reason they're not citing examples.
      Because unlike this shitty book I wanted this thread to steer clear of identity politics and actually be about mammal evolution.
      Also because editing an image is a pain in the ass. I did a sloppy job and didn't try to align anything; you can see 7 times I mentioned from OP here.

      Nice to know I'm not alone in hating this woman for shitting up a fascinating subject with idpol.

      Likewise.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        it's like being a cuckold but instead of letting dudes fuck your wife you just let your people's pride get raw dogged up the butt

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >platypus history
        >Because the naturalists and anatomists who first described these species were white Europeans they were inherently biased in their observations of the animals
        ???
        what the fuck is she even trying to say? White people do be hating Platypuses?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          its because shes retarded, its really hard to imagine something you have no concept for or perception for, like the questing beast and the qilin are both depictions of the same animal, a giraffe

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        She writes like a high schooler pseud.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        jfc. i actually really liked topics like animals cause i thought theres no way theyd randomly insert feminism/white people bad or whatever but apparently i was wrong. Anyway cool thread about evolution.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        She just needs a good dicking.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      As someone who works in the archeology department at Faggovillian University, allow me to inform you that the crazed woke mob has introduced intersecionalism into fucking bones pulled out of the earth. There is not a lecture, essay, journal, or study that isn't absolutely dripping with this filth. I shit you not the current trend is to prevent saying whether or not a person we excavate is male or female as "we don't know their gender identity". You can not comprehend how absolutely unhinged these people are. Yes I mad.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >woke
        Sheepie sheepie go back to sleepie

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        This is part of the reason I left Biology. Anything to do with environmental science was plagued by political sidetracking

  17. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    serves you right buying a book written by a woman

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >buying books by female authors

      lol

      lmao this.
      Anyway, I think both Michael Benton and Steve Brusatte have some books about the rise of mammals so you might want to check them out.

  18. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
  19. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
  20. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      A very passionate picture.

  21. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
  22. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
  23. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Dumping some anteosaurus

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