Relocating a bird nest

Found this nest at work a few days ago. It’s in a pretty bad spot, I’d have to say. I can’t say that this particular table gets constant use throughout my work day but I can’t imagine that living below a grinding wheel is good for the future baby birds or the current parent. I don’t know what species of bird built it, other than that it looked like a speedy brown blur as it flew out when I got too close. There are eggs in the nest as well, and I was just wondering if it would be a good idea to relocate the nest so that the parents would be able to egg-sit properly. I don’t think it would be an issue to just move the entire table closer to a wood line and I don’t know if I can pull the nest out by itself. If I move it too far will the parents be able to find it again? Or is it just too late for this nest?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I think people are way too emotionally invested to protecting nests, it's normal for birds to lose them, it's ok they make new ones. If you wish to save do it because you enjoy seeing and hearing baby birbs.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      looks like a golfball

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OP here, I think I agree with your assessment. When I asked my supervisor if it would be ok to try and move the table that the nest was housed in he just laughed at me. I don't think it was overly malicious of anything like that, just related to the other bit of your statement. Losses happen.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bump for conclusion

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you, I've been keeping track of the nest. Momma bird is in and out and I usually get a blink or two from here when I do peek to make sure the eggs are still being sat. The table doesn't see un-heavy use throughout the day, so some of my coworkers will still remark that she'll shoot by sometimes when they need to fix or grind something up.
      I'll be sure to post some pics of the little ones when if they hatch.
      In the meantime, here's a quick webm. Not really much more than the photo posted but the wren's wasp friend also showed up so that's nice.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I know it’s been a few days but here’s a small update. The eggs appear to be ok and are being taken care of. So whoever said to just leave them alone was right.
    I did move the grinder though, but this was taken after so it doesn’t appear to have disturbed them too much.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    are the nest or birds bothering you? or will the baby birds bother you? if yes, dispose of the nest, the parents can build a new one with new eggs in another place. if no, keep it
    >inb4 replies comparing baby birds to human children
    kys

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >are the nest or birds bothering you?
      No I'd be more bothered if the baby birds died because the parents chose to nest next to a metal shop.
      Though they seem to be doing fine, a coworker said he saw the momma bird zoom out of the nest when he tried to grind something after lunch, so hopefully I'm worried for nothing. At the very least I'm going to move the grinder.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >some beautiful wild animals have chosen to make my garage their home
    >how do I eradicate them?
    Leave them alone you ass. Let them have their nest. You don't want baby birds? What are you, a sociopath?

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Birds tend to be picky about nests. There’s not much that can be guaranteed but moving it somewhere else is liable to result in them not finding it again

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There is a very high chance that if you relocate the nest the parents will consider it lost and will abandon it

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Birds tend to be picky about nests. There’s not much that can be guaranteed but moving it somewhere else is liable to result in them not finding it again

      Even if I move the whole table without physical touching or disturbing the nest?
      Also as an aside I’m pretty sure that these are Carolina Wrens, pic related. It’s clearer on a video I took but I can’t upload that right now.
      I also looked up the incubation period for wrens, and it’s 12 to 16 days. My quick maths puts them hatching at around July 4th to the 6th. My question is then, is it maybe better to move them after they hatch so it’s easier for the parents to find them when they start chirping? Or is it just moving the nest at any time is a bad idea?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >july
        I mean June.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I just wouldn't mess with it until the chicks are grown and out then dispose of the nest

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Ok, sounds good. They are in a paint bay however. It’s not walled in or anything, but would the fumes affect them at all? I’m also wondering about incubation. So far today, besides one instance in the morning, I haven’t seen any adult birds sitting the eggs. It averages 80-90+ degrees (fahrenheit) here during the day, don’t know what temperature the nest is in the shade.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I mean if the choices are moving the nest and more than likely causing the parents to abandon it, or trusting that these animals picked a spot that works for them... I'd go with the latter

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Ok, this makes sense to me. I’m just worried that the noise of the shop will stress-kill them.

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