Post interesting invasive species from your country.

Post interesting invasive species from your country. Here in Germany we have these parrots which just established themselves a couple of years ago. They seem to be sccessful despite the climate. I saw them near many different citys along the Rhine, so it seems like they've definetly spread and their population is growing. I don't think it's clear how exactly they got here, maybe they're escaped pets or zoo animals or something

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We have them in London, you can see them near parks and green areas.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Quite the opposite of an invasive species since they were native here until the 1800s, but the wild turkeys have been doing some damage as they progress up north through new england. I wanna eat one.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >wild turkeys have been doing some damage as they progress up north through new england
      Ecological or economical?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Economical. I'm sure the coyotes are having a blast.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We've got those parrots in the UK too.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen these dudes in Spain, Germany and South Africa. Seriously how are they able to become invasive to this extent when no other parrot is? There are multiple parrots native to the same area and only this one has managed to spread so far.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      they're different species though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Because these are cheap and easily available, meaning that lots of drooling retards were able to buy them and dump them outside

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    We apparently have a couple stray kangaroos in Germany, escaped from zoos and private captivity

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      how many? Would be pretty cool to have some roos hoppin around

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        At least one in the Eifel region

        And there was a herd of bennet kangaroos that got released from a pet zoo by "rowdies" some 15 years back. There are probably more, but I knew of the Bennet roos and stumbled upon the Eifel one just yesterday

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The UK has a population of feral wallabies too

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Invades local river system
    >Absolutely mogs every other species and spreads throughout almost every north america river in a few decades
    >Muricans won't eat them because muh bones and that calling them "carp" makes people think they are mud-sifting fish when they are mostly filter feeders and are arguably the cleanest fish to eat in the water.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Buddy looks like he had one too many chromosomes for lunch

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, people say that about the mud but don't think twice about eating catfish.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Fish don't taste good if they aren't critically endangered, pedestrian scum. You really want us to eat one of the most common fish in our river systems?

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i think it was 2007, parrot like that escaped from some balcony in neiborhood, thing was like a fucking ufo, flying at amazing speed among the commieblocks, eating from every tree(im in a balkan shithole cunt theres owergrown bush and orchards everywhere), screaching in decibels, scaring off the pigeons and fighting with the crows
    Then winter came and it froze
    We even tried to figure out how to trap it so it would survive but fuck it it died in the cold, was sad
    It was amazing to see the thing free, i never imagined it can fly that fucking fast, it was like some stupid metaphor for freedom or something, a fucking parrot gone feral

    nowdays it wouldnt freeze, the temperatures barely go under zero, funny how things changed in a decade

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    another one from Germany are these big amphibious rodents that also started showing up just a couple of years ago, at least in the lakes of the big park area I know them from. They are the biggest rodents I've seen in the wild, I bet they are some of the largest period behind capybara and beavers. They also kinda look like beavers, just with rat tails.
    Retards keep feeding them because they look cute, which made them super tame. They'll now come up to people and beg for food. Of course this is bad for the local ecosystem, which is why I think there already are plans about reducing their population

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      We have these in Arkansas

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >plans

      There is a $6/tail bounty on them in Louisiana and has been since the early 2000s.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      We have those in france too
      We also eat them

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm not sure if the american mink is interesting, but it looks like they outcompete the European mink. They're literally getting colonized here.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    European wall lizards in North America are pretty cool. There's a population quite close to me so I've been thinking of going over to catch some for my garden when temperatures are warmer.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Make them a terrarium that simulates their natural habitat. Make them feel at home.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >3rd world shithole
    >loses to Ukraine
    China is scarier

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    We have them in italy too. I didn't know they lived as far north as germany

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    We have them in italy too. I didn't know they lived as far north as germany

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Invasive species are nature's salvation

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >globohomo but for animals

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You forgot plants chud

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Beavers in the southernmost part of argentina
    >Introduce for making coats from the skin
    >Population in tierra del fuego is really low and beavers reproduced really fast
    >Nowadays the government even pays you to poach them

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      if you get paid to shoot them it isn't poaching, poaching is illegal hunting.

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hello to everyone from Russia! This hero's name is Gosha. We bought it in Greece in 1996. He was 4 years old. Now he is already 30 years old, and he is still as good! I'll add more photos below.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous
      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/IBiJfdL.jpg

        https://i.imgur.com/Lr3PH20.jpg

        Hello to everyone from Russia! This hero's name is Gosha. We bought it in Greece in 1996. He was 4 years old. Now he is already 30 years old, and he is still as good! I'll add more photos below.

        Bro, my literal budgie has a bigger cage with more toys.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/5VMimXd.jpg

      https://i.imgur.com/IBiJfdL.jpg

      Here we go

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      what the fuck, that's horrible. let him out of that way too small cage now you animal abuser

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Stop crying lmao. It's a good cage.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >small
          >no toys or literally anything else in it
          Yeah seems like a good cage

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            There's a toy that didn't get into the frame. We also release it to fly around the house every day, snowflake.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >good cage
          >cant even fly inside it
          what the hell is wrong with you

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      have a nice day

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      As someone who had a parrot when I was like 12-13 that I didn’t take care of properly and neglected due to being a little idiot this shit destroys me. I will never regret anything more

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I hope your fellow third world neighbors stick you in a prison to slowly die for decades

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's a common occurrence in Russia.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      go die in Ukraine gay bitch

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Hello from canada! I would feed it to my cat. It looks delicious.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/5VMimXd.jpg

      https://i.imgur.com/IBiJfdL.jpg

      Does he at least have a window for natural sunlight?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/5VMimXd.jpg

      https://i.imgur.com/IBiJfdL.jpg

      >bird gulag.
      Did someone train him to insult Putin or something?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/5VMimXd.jpg

      https://i.imgur.com/IBiJfdL.jpg

      >30 years
      #FREE GOSHA

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Theres ostriches roaming the outback

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      How hard can they be to exterminate? Are they impervious to small arms fire like the emus?

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Austin, Texas has a huge population of Monk Parakeets -- which look a lot like the birds you posted. They got loose decades ago when a shipment of them to be sold as pets somehow fell off a truck or whatever. They sound very different than north american birds, so when you look and see a bright green bird its very startling. There, too, it freezes at times in winter and yet they survive.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      We have loads of these in London UK now too

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      there are colonies of these guys in many major cities all around the world. they're so prevalent because they're one of the few parrot species that can survive in temperate climates with cold winters. unlike other parrots they build large communal nests to keep warm. so when pet monk parakeets escape they can survive and breed in places where other types of parrot would just die.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >established themselves a couple of years ago
    They've been there for almost a decade now.
    >I don't think it's clear how exactly they got here
    It is, negligent pet owners released them outside and they survived thanks to the stable high temperatures of urban environments.

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    C O Y P U
    O
    Y
    P
    U

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      eventually the Burmese pythons to move north and fix this one

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Psittacula krameri
    Good morning sirs

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/dgLNVTP.jpg

      Post interesting invasive species from your country. Here in Germany we have these parrots which just established themselves a couple of years ago. They seem to be sccessful despite the climate. I saw them near many different citys along the Rhine, so it seems like they've definetly spread and their population is growing. I don't think it's clear how exactly they got here, maybe they're escaped pets or zoo animals or something

      I wish we had cute invasive species like this

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You really dont, they are pieces of shit that never stop screaming. NEVER

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Those birds seem fine at first, but they really are autistic pieces of shit.

          This anon gets it. Looks like karma has finally come to collect from Germany.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I thought you meant south asians and central africans were invading your country

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't get invasive birds. If they're so effortlessly successful, why weren't they here in the first place?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Birds are affected by geographical barriesr like any other animal, the fact that they can live in two distant places doesn't mean that they can survive the travel between them.
      Also birds like the parrots OP posted rely on human infrastructure to survive outside of their natural range.

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