>noo you cant just insert a GFP gene in a mouse embryo, let it grow and then surgically attach its skin to other mouse just to check if there...

>noo you can’t just insert a GFP gene in a mouse embryo, let it grow and then surgically attach its skin to other mouse just to check if there’s skin cell growth on the other mouse

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Like GloFish?

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    in some mexican flea market, I remember seeing a bunch of baby chickens painted in bright colors

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    BROLY MOUSE

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I want naturally Green Hair/Fur.
    That's so pretty. What the frick.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Funny how no mammal is green.
      And getting moldy shit in their fur does not count.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        I've always wondered why mammals don't have pretty hair or skin colors like brids and reptiles , imagine if we xould have natural green hair

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          My theory is that birds have an extremely effective evasion tactic so they don't need camouflage

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Mammals have no sense of style. The ones who do get bright colors still are ugly.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous
            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              Reminder that tigers actually appear green to most of their prey because they lack the ability to see reds. Even tigers themselves don't know they are orange

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              tigers are so cool, man

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          one important role of color is sexual selection to look beautiful from other individuals of the same species.
          Animals other than mammals are tetrachromats. And they had developed brightness for this purpose.
          But mammals are basically dichromats, due to the long period of the nocturnal lives in their early stage where they hid themselves from dinosaurs. If a dog got green fur, it's no different to yellow fur to their eyes.
          only primates regained an additional sense of color very recently to distinguish edible plants as trichromats.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            *brightness -> colorfulness

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >imagine if we xould have natural green hair
          An anon once explained to me why mammals can't have green hair or fur. Something about the structure or hair/fur being unable to reflect light at the necessary wavelengths or some shit. I forget.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Funny how no mammal is green.
      And getting moldy shit in their fur does not count.

      actually. Color green seems beneficial to avoid being hunted by birds in grasses.
      (note that yellow or brown fur is sufficient to avoid attacks from the larger mammals, since they are almost all dichromat that can't distinguish the color yellow, red, and green.)

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous
  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    parabiosis ;-;

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Grim

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Imagine being a mammal model organism.

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Is there really a gene that makes you green?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I haven't seen this particular meme, but it would seem that this was a scheme by a team where a machine produced a gene to make the mouse green so they could glean if the other mouse's skin would teem.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I haven't seen this particular meme, but it would seem that this was a scheme by a team where a machine produced a gene to make the mouse green so they could glean if the other mouse's skin would teem.

      >Aequorea victoria_green_flourescent_protein_reference
      MSKGEELFTGVVPILVELDGDVNGHKFSVSGEGEGDATYGKLTLKFICTTGKLPVPWPTLVTTFSYGVQCFSRYPDHMKQHDFFKSAMPEGYVQERTIFFKDDGNYKTRAEVKFEGDTLVNRIELKGIDFKEDGNILGHKLEYNYNSHNVYIMADKQKNGIKVNFKIRHNIEDGSVQLADHYQQNTPIGDGPVLLPDNHYLSTQSALSKDPNEKRDHMVLLEFVTAAGITHGMDELYK

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    brown mouse green mouse
    brown green mouse

  9. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    What's happening there ?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      The opposite of separating conjoined twins.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >remove part of the skin of one mouse
      >graft a second mouse to the first so that its skin covers the part that got removed from the first
      >the wound heals
      >remove the second mouse after things heal up
      >the second mouse's skin now grows where the first part was removed
      we already know skin grafts are possible, but I don't think they've done it in some kind of reverse conjoined twins surgery before. some evil mengele nazi shit if you ask me.

  10. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Did they squish those two mouses together and make a mint choccy boi?

  11. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Kek why is the mouse green?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Because it has been genetically modified with a protein that converts normally-outside-vision light to green light. Consequently, it also glows in the dark!

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        I guarantee you that it doesn’t, and that it actually fluoresces.
        https://www.researchgate.net/publication/298420450_Differentiation_of_Apical_Bud_Cells_in_a_Newly_Developed_Apical_Bud_Transplantation_Model_Using_GFP_Transgenic_Mice_as_Donor
        Oh well would you look at that, it doesn’t produce light.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >umm umm uuuh ACKSHUALLY green fluorescent protein FLUORESCES uh huh huh
          wow, no shit? you are very smart
          for a nolabz Black personmonkey
          lmao

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