Land squids, why not?

Land squids, why not? They'd be able to overcome the cons of living in the sea and with time be able to get fire going and let things happen from there.

  1. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    They'd need a shell like snails since they both belong to the mollusc family.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous
  2. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Mollusks cannot live on land. They need to be in water

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      wut?

  3. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Freshwater kills them.

  4. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Land squids are crustaceans.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      This, just wait long enough and eventually they turn into crabs.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        how about a squid with a crab carapace to facilitate landborneness?

  5. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure that's a dog

  6. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    The energy required to fight against gravity would be impossible to sustain in nature.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous
  7. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cephalopods are highly resistant to mutation because they depend on RNA editing for bodily functions. Genetic changes must be much more exact otherwise they're sickly and dying at birth. Nothing else on earth is like this. Cephalopods are not able to withstand "junk mutations" and eventually get something out of them so they barely evolve.

    This heavy reliance on RNA editing is a solid argument for intelligent design or intervention existing not for all life on earth, but for some life. In many ways they are clearly intentionally gimped. It's like someone didn't want them developing too early. Brains wrapped around esophagi. Death from mating. It's strange, almost too strange to be arbitrary. It seems that they have put an artificial brake on cephalopod evolution to ensure it only changes when they want to change it, as if they are controlling the timing to guarantee it will become the dominant lifeform. Or more likely - to guarantee it won't. What if current cephalopods are the genetic punishment for a prior civilization's hubris? What if they had to watch their offspring hatch as primitive slugs, knowing they would die out succeeded by mere blobs of organs? What if they had to fade away being told that their progeny was genetically guaranteed to never evolve to their height again and that their lineage was ruined for eternity?

    What would it be punishment for? What if the punishers had to cope with a similar event in a great interspecies war and it was revenge? What if they did one worse to the tentacled ones and their ruined progeny at least had evolutionary potential?

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'd read your book lovecraftanon.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      either you stole this from some sci-fi story or you're a genius

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      that does seem likely.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      I want more Waufposts like this and less like all the other Waufposts I've seen

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      take your meds and fuck off religious cuck

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        did you reply to the wrong post again

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Literal bot reply

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      damn Qu

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      [...]

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      Extremely unlikely.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      >What if current cephalopods are the genetic punishment for a prior civilization's hubris?
      Will the squids be grateful once we unfuck them back to normal, or will they turn us into rna editing monkeys? Maybe, that's what already happened. Human-Squid cruelty cycle lasting for eons.

  8. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    birds. nigs are just waterballoons with tenatacles, they'd be blown the fuck out by a seagull in short order.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      clearly they need a exoskeleton.

  9. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    would just be glorified snails

  10. 6 months ago
    Anonymous

    Basically because they only have a lifespan of around a year at most, I'm pretty sure is the reason.

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      can't we CRISPR them to be better?

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Cephalopods have mechanisms to edit their own genes on the fly.
        The real problem that is going to hold them back is the lack of a rigid internal body structure and skin that isn't going to last long out of the water.
        There was a paper that got some headlines a few years ago about how an octopus might as well be from another planet for just how fucking weird it is on every level.
        Also reef cuttlefish engage in complex social structures. And recently they found two spots off the coast of Australia where there's a a high density of octobros in a really small spot where they have behaviors never observed before like social hierarchies.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          They edit their RNA, not their DNA. Also despite what headlines say this occurs in all living organisms and is one of the most evolutionarily conserved properties of RNAs. This is also one of mechanisms that allows our immune system to make a huge variety of antibodies that match virus/bacteria that didn't even exist when we were born. Cephalopds, squids and cuttlefish just do more RNA editing than most animals, in this case they change it to adapt to cold. Nothing out of this world here, just a curious trait of this branch of the molluscs. Also they use the same basic cellular machinery that all living being on Earth use. Don't let misleading headlines fool you.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        Fool we can't even CRISPR a vaccine that stops transmission of covid, what makes you think we're capable of that yet?

    • 6 months ago
      Anonymous

      For real? There’s no way that’s correct.

      • 6 months ago
        Anonymous

        A year isn't correct, its more like 5 but males die earlier if the have sex. The thing is species that don't live long don't really develop culture since they don't pass on their knowledge

        Cephalopods have mechanisms to edit their own genes on the fly.
        The real problem that is going to hold them back is the lack of a rigid internal body structure and skin that isn't going to last long out of the water.
        There was a paper that got some headlines a few years ago about how an octopus might as well be from another planet for just how fucking weird it is on every level.
        Also reef cuttlefish engage in complex social structures. And recently they found two spots off the coast of Australia where there's a a high density of octobros in a really small spot where they have behaviors never observed before like social hierarchies.

        This sounds promising though but Id have to look at the sources.

        • 6 months ago
          Anonymous

          So giant and colossal squid only live 5 years? That’s an incredible growth rate. I guess they don’t have bones?

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            Those species may have a bigger lifespan than most other cephalopods. Hence the size. Also squid have spades inside their body which are remnants of their ancestors' exoskeletons.

          • 6 months ago
            Anonymous

            >they don’t have bones?
            They're mollusks, related to clams, oysters, and snails.
            Instead of an external shell it grows inside their body.
            In squid and octopus its pretty vestigial, but cuttlefish have a big one that makes up most of their back, and they use the density of that cuttlebone to help them with buoyancy.

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