isopod infodump

isopods are considered crustaceans because of their segmented shells and jointed legs!!
some of them are land animals but most live deep at the bottom of the ocean in cold water. both terrestrial and aquatic isopods have gills, but terrestrial gills (called pleopods) are a little different, they're like a mix of lungs and gills
a fun little fact about isopods is that they can be hermaphroditic, SO YAYYY TRANS CRUSTACEANS!!!!!
isopods are detritivores, meaning they eat dead stuff. on land they eat rotting wood, dead leaves, and fungi. in the ocean, they eat dead animals like squids and whales.
they're also invertebrates!
all isopods whether in the ocean or on land are sensitive to light, which is why aquatic ones live at the bottom of the ocean or are nocturnal if they live in shallow water, and terrestrial ones live on the ground under branches and rocks and leaves (though this also has to do with the fact that these areas are moist, helping them to breathe through their pleopods).

if any of this information is incorrect, PLEASE let me know, i want to learn anything about isopods that i can!

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I never thought I would see isopods homosexualed up but here we are. It's all so tiresome.

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    how badly would one of these little terrariums smell?
    It's damp soil and decaying matter, can't imagine it's very pleasant.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      the fist hous to a few days after you set it up new, or put new material in, it will maybe smell a bit like forest, after that there is no smell at all (i have 15 terrariums in my room with decaying matter )

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous
  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >SO YAYYY TRANS CRUSTACEANS!!!!!

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      With the modern horrors of genetic engineering it is only a matter of time before someone engineers trans tri-color patterned isopods, anon. You will witness manmade horrors beyond your desire to comprehend.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Many fish and some reptiles actually ARE able to change sex. Which isn't the same as hermaphrodite and social gender doesn't apply to fricking fish and isopods, so not touching whether that's trans.

        I've personally had nearly a half dozen full sized, adult female swordtails turn into males - a couple after having given birth in the past. It's only from female to male doe that species, though.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, sequentially hermaphroditic animals are pretty neat but people will anthropomorphize and also project their ideals into just about any medium they enjoy. Anime, biology, etc..

        • 1 year ago
          isopod fan

          i obviously know myself that hermaphroditic animals aren't actually trans, i just think it's pretty neat and its funny to call them trans.. especially when it makes people angry

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            well your shenanigans have kept the 'pod thread alive, so i'll take it, also post more isopods

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      i mean if anything, wouldn't that be more like non-binary or maybe intersex?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >non binary
        not real
        >intersex
        nice word for hermaphrodite so yes. that's not uncommon in the animal kingdom

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Nonbinary only exists for sponges. The purest animal unburdened by satan’s spindles AKA neurons.

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >they eat dead stuff.
    does that include the corpses of their own kind?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Yes. They definitely love dried up bugs/crustaceans and will happily "recycle" their own kind. Protein is pretty valuable stuff, after all.

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    >plastic chinese takout box [this is the second one because i think i drowned all of my previous ones :(]
    >half of the leftmost-third is covered in moss adorned with little pebbles and a wooden cross made out of 2 small sticks i superglued together to commemorate the dead that came before them which are placed atop the moss, it's a graveyard basically
    >also planted this weird vine-like plant i found in a backyard that was growing everywhere and it's doing well so far
    >the other half, above the graveyard, is a bunch of torn-up leaves i bunched in the corner as a feeding zone
    >the middle third at the top has a pinecone for decoration and just for fun, in the very middle are 2 sizeable chips from an egshell for calcium that i thoroughly scrubbed out, and below is a blank area for free roam
    >the rightmost third of the box on the top half has 3 good-sized rocks bunched together for decoration
    >bottom half is 3 or so sizeable pieces of bark for the pods to hide under and hang out together, and in front of the bar, a little more leaf litter in case they don't want to travel all the way across
    all of this is placed atop a layer of garden mulch packed as thick as i could make it. it's one of those plastic chinese food boxes, about 6in by 10in. i drilled 20-25 small holes in the clear top lid on the top and on the sides for ventilation, too. i make sure to keep it moist and spritz the left half once a day or every other day
    how did i do

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      oh, and i forgot to mention, these are just a bunch of armadillidium vulgare i found under logs and stuff. i think there are a couple of different species, though, since a few have those little spikes on their tail end and seem a bit more flat and less curl-able. where do you guys find pods?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >plastic chinese takeout box
      Sounds familiar. Otherwise it sounds fine. I like to bake any leaves or sticks I get from outside though in a closed container with water at about 175f for an hour or more. Also I've never had any need to scrub the eggshells I put in with my isopods. As long as it's not moldy it should be fine, any protein that's from dried up egg is almost certainly going to get gobbled up fast by them.

      Also I like to put some kind of mesh or cloth over any holes I cut into my containers. Hot glue works fine to adhering to plastic(as long as it doesn't have to hold up a lot of weight or anything) and chiffon works great at keeping out fungus gnats. I've also done little deli cups with the lids cut up a bit and then paper towel glued over the cut holes and that worked out well enough -- my only issue with those containers was that they'd get too dry too fast and I'd have to rehydrate them a lot. That was an issue with the holes being too big though.

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    One of my big ‘pods, munching on cruts. Currently having an earwig infestation, have to start all over. Frick those things.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      What's wrong with the earwigs? They're not attacking your isopods are they? Also are you pasteurizing your media before you add it? I.E. are you baking stuff at like 175f, under 100c for about an hour or more before you add it if you took it from outside?

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        I don’t take stuff from outside - I order from vivarium guys like BioDude. Don’t know how they got in, I did have a wooden hide stored in a bin near the garage, then returned it to the tank, that’s all I can think of. They are definitely eating those pods

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          The wooden bit that you kept in the garage definitely sounds like it could've been the culprit. Especially if you've ever seen earwigs in your garage before. I can't imagine some earwig at some point while it was there didn't lay some eggs in it. Best of luck in separating them though. I'd honestly just get a temporary set up with new dirt or just hold them in something somewhat damp but clean(the isopods that is) and try and bake whatever you want to reuse. I don't know how successful that'll be though, I've never done anything like that. My only unwelcome guests tended to be fungus gnats or detritivorous mites and those died off on their own.

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Dairy Cow isopods like to eat protein

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      They like duckweed too. I feed mine duckweed from my aquarium regularly.

  9. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I collected some aquatic isopods recently. They are kinda cool

  10. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Pod moms carry the eggs inside a special brood pouch until they hatch, the babies then ride around under the mom until they’re big enough to pop off.

  11. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I have two critter keepers of isopods. What sort of terrarium plants can I get to give them a great little place to grow?
    I feed repashy morning wood and keep the humidity correct as it is. I hope a terrarium with living plants may help.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      What sort of isopods? I've got a small succulent garden going with zebras and powder oranges myself, but depending on lighting it'd be super easy to keep them in a moist environment with pothos, nerve plant, philodendron, ficus, etc.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Look at them, they’re so cute

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      They like to hide under moss and cork bark. They’ll eat the detritus of just about any plant as long as it is decaying. They’d also enjoy a cuttlebone, probably since plants don’t provide calcium.
      As long as it’s moist and cozy they will inhabit it, eat the detritus and make more pods

  12. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I started making terrariums and soon learned about isopods. They're such cool little guys, so your thread gets a bump.
    >hermaphroditic
    >trans
    What? Don't bring that here anyway. We're here to talk about plants and animals.

    • 1 year ago
      isopod fan

      bro what are you talking about lmao, hermaphroditic is a scientific term for animals that can develop traits of the opposite sex throughout their lifespan. some are born with both, some grow one or the other. it isn't an unrelated thing...

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        Being trans is not the same, kys.

        • 1 year ago
          isopod fan

          seethe more! 🙂

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            troony doesn't know biology

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              shut up and look at the goddamn isopods

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              Frick off.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                You were the one who injected your shitty politics into this thread, we're here to talk about animals, YOU frick off and stop being obnoxious about it.

                shut up and look at the goddamn isopods

                ^

  13. 1 year ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous
  14. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Wait, what species of isopods are hermaphroditic? Do any of the land species happen to be?

    • 1 year ago
      isopod fan

      most hermaphroditic isopods are aquatic, such as the "tongue-eating louse", aka cymothoa exigua. some evidence also exists of hermaphroditic terrestrial isopods, mainly in woodlice and pill bugs, but these instances seem to be a lot less common than in aquatic isopods. i'm not certain as to every species of hermaphroditic isopod, since it's kind of hard to find recorded evidence of them, so i haven't really been able to find a list or anything similar lol.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        That's a shame, I would really love to be try and get some hermaphroditic isopods. I guess I'll just have to settle for getting pseudarmadillo isopods. Those little bastards are so cool looking and just south of me in Cuba(I'm from Florida).

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