i wonder why there were no carnovorous sauropods.

i wonder why there were no carnovorous sauropods.

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

DMT Has Friends For Me Shirt $21.68

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    There are.

    >everyone mad

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Ask yourself why there are no carnivorous elephants and you might have your answer

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    dinosaurs never existed.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Prove it.

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Their long necks allowed them to browse a huge area of food without needing to move their bodies much, allowing for energy efficient feeding which allowed for gigantism.
    Their heads are glorified grabber arms, the teeth don't chew they're just rakes to scrape off plant matter and transport it to the gut for processing.
    These features are not very useful on a carnivore. It's diet would need to consistent of massive amounts of small mammals it could swallow while which it would be feeding on at all times. But there's not nearly enough small animals in a given area for it to efficiently feed without moving much, and trying to catch prey would use up way too much energy for something this size.
    Could it theoretically work eventually for smaller ones? Maybe, but it wouldn't work out long term since theropods are just better carnivores and would outcompete any upstart wannabe carnivorous sauropods.
    Of course you have theropods that evolves into long necked plant eaters, so surely thats novel enough as far as dinosaur switcheroos.

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    They were too busy figuring out how to have sex.

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    You can wonder these things in a dinosaur general. Stop spamming Wauf with your moronic dinosaur threads. Only you and maybe 3 other autistic morons care about these threads.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >Only you and maybe 3 other autistic morons care about these threads.
      probably not even that many

      for example this moron

      Some might've, but just as a means of niche partitioning. And even just in the water.
      If I recall well, diplodocus was found to largely eat soft water plants.
      Theory being that it was done as niche partitioning with all the other Sauropods. Long neck being of use reaching farther into deeper water.
      I also heard it on Eons, so temper expectations.

      using the words "theory" and "niche partitioning" wrong is very likely to also be OP and several other posters itt. He changes IP's all the time, but he can't change his broken brain.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        I just got here dude. And I told you I'm just half remembering some PBS youtube video.
        Chillax.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      I'd rather have a few dinosaur threads than countless bait threads b***hing about pitbulls.

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Learn how to spell.

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Carnivores evolve into herbivores, not the other way around.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Explain Thylacoleo.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        >The ancestors of thylacoleonids are believed to have been herbivores, something unusual for carnivores.
        have you ever heard of "the exception that proves the rule"?

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          It's less common but it still happened.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            yes, very rarely.

            that's the exception that proves the rule.

            There's almost never an absolute rule in biology. There's usually an exception.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous
      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        what plants did its ancestors eat?

  9. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Long necks are for eating from tree tops. Why the frick would a carnivore need a long ass neck?

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      ???

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        this. also i still believe they passed most of the time underwater, they even had their nostrils on the top of the skull.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          1. they'd float
          2. they probably couldn't breathe with their lungs under that much water pressure.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >that much water pressure
            lmao do you even know how this stuff works? plus brachiosaurus was 18 mt tall and 1,5 atm are hardly an issue when you have multiple hearts in the neck and swallow tailed valve in the arteries

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              >float
              lmao they were like 70 tons, not even a car sized pair of lungs could make that float. maybe the fat but i hardly believe they had much fat, since they're herbivores and used to live in subtropical climates.

              sorry for not responding, there's so much moronation here it's hard to sort out.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              >float
              lmao they were like 70 tons, not even a car sized pair of lungs could make that float. maybe the fat but i hardly believe they had much fat, since they're herbivores and used to live in subtropical climates.

              [...]
              sorry for not responding, there's so much moronation here it's hard to sort out.

              Let's see if we can run through this

              1. air pressure doesn't matter when it comes to breathing underwater in this case because it's insignificant compared to water pressure.

              2. When the animal inhales underwater it has to displace not just the water beside it, but all the water above it. meaning the animal has to displace potentially hundreds of tons of water with each breath. It probably can't do that.

              3. multiple hearts and arterial valves don't assist breathing

              4. The tendency to float has nothing to do with weight

              5. Muscle is only slightly heavier than water, it takes very little to make it float

              6. Their lungs were much bigger than cars. They had over a dozen lungs that took up spaces much larger than cars.

              7. Even lungs the size of cars would be enough to make them float.

              8. How much fat they have makes no difference to how they float, since air is much more buoyant.

              9. I don't think you know what subtropical climates are, or which sauropods lived in them. Or which ones didn't.

              10. You have to be over 18 to post here.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Holy frick, r*ddit is down the hall and on your left. don't let the door hit you on the way out.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                You think just because you got kicked out of reddit you're welcome here?

                frick off, you're the reason we hate reddit.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >meaning the animal has to displace potentially hundreds of tons of water with each breath. It probably can't do that.
                Yeah go tell that to a whale or an elephant crossing a river. I bet you're one of those stupid fricks who thinks people in a train die crushed by the pressure of the mountain when they enter a tunnel

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                neither whales or elephants inhale when they're 50 feet down in the water, you fricking moron

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                Moron is the moronic prostitute who gave you birth you butthole. Try to explain how a ln elephant is able to dive using only its proboscis to breathe, despite being over 7 meters, and i refuse to use your moronic imperial system, down the water?

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >Try to explain how a ln elephant is able to dive using only its proboscis to breathe, despite being over 7 meters
                They don't.

                even if they did, that doesn't mean they can do it at twice the depth without a diaphragm, using lungs bigger than an entire elephant, through a snorkel taller than an elephant.

                You are fricking stupid.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >They don't
                you are absolutely fricking pathetic, an i'm done talking to you

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >i'm done talking to you
                you aren't talking english anyways

                floating on the surface is NOT diving 7m down and breathing through the trunk.

                go be moronic somewhere else you fricking moron.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                >lists a two page long bunch of "facts" that are absolutely nonsensical and factually wrong
                >uses a smug tone of self perceived superiority to make you believe he's right
                >uses plebbit spacing
                >"you have to be 18 to post here"
                I swear Waufnons are some of the most irritating, smarmy, insufferable, unbearable scumbags in all of the chans.

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                I'm a bit concerned a complete moron like you is going around unsupervised

                are the animals in your pic breathing underwater?

              • 1 year ago
                Anonymous

                one of them is, yes.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          >float
          lmao they were like 70 tons, not even a car sized pair of lungs could make that float. maybe the fat but i hardly believe they had much fat, since they're herbivores and used to live in subtropical climates.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >car sized lungs
            Remember, this is a dinosaur, it's not just got one set of lungs, and the main lungs are probably more like suburban sized.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          Some might've, but just as a means of niche partitioning. And even just in the water.
          If I recall well, diplodocus was found to largely eat soft water plants.
          Theory being that it was done as niche partitioning with all the other Sauropods. Long neck being of use reaching farther into deeper water.
          I also heard it on Eons, so temper expectations.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      >what is a snake

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      or it was to balance the defensive tail whip

  10. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *