Do you believe the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker still lives?

Do you believe the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker still lives, Wauf?

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  1. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I like to think so, but the frickers were pigeonholed (no pun intended) into a specific niche that just wasn’t sustainable or compatible with increased human development. Very particular habitats, very particular diets. Shouldn’t be that surprising to anyone with even a passing understanding of evolution and past extinctions that these guys have probably flown to the big marsh in the sky.

  2. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      For comparison

  3. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    iirc, they mainly fed on beetles that only spawned after forest fires. Even if we cloned them there wouldn't be enough food to support breeding populations in the wild.

  4. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    Nope all gone stop looking for us

  5. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    This something which I don't understand about evolutionists. There are only a few thousand years of human history recorded, and most of the animals which we have found fossils or carcasses of are currently extinct, over 90% of known species. So, if all these animals are constantly going extinct, where are all the new ones evolving to take their place? Believing in the Bible makes more sense.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      Life has only ever gotten less diverse and it will eventually dwindle to nothing and take 4 billion years to recover.

  6. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen a couple of these threads now. I'm not certain, but we have big (~2.5-3.0') woodpeckers that are pretty similar around here. Kinda rare, but not like "oh shit, once in a lifetime" rare. Usually see a few each year.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      That's tall, not wingspan.

  7. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    I'm agnostic. I just don't know.

  8. 1 year ago
    Anonymous

    It's extinct. We could have preserved them for the future, but didn't.

    • 1 year ago
      Anonymous

      the carolina parakeet used to be native to the same area. Many Mediterranean islands have been totally cleaned out of native birds because of this type of moronic, low IQ, mexicans cleaning out a fish pond type of behavior.

      • 1 year ago
        Anonymous

        The Carolina Parakeet and Passenger Pigeon had to be done in by a disease. Their collapses were far too rapid to blame on people alone.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          The passenger pidgeon died out because their breeding forests were logged and what little remained was over hunted. They were basically spawn-camped to death.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            The account I read about the Carolina Parakeet is that flocks would get killed all at once by hunters. The birds would try to come back and hang around the dead ones instead of scattering.

            People definitely exacerbated their declines, but there were still flocks until suddenly there wasn't.

            • 1 year ago
              Anonymous

              The collapse of the passenger pidgeon was a multi-year process.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          The account I read about the Carolina Parakeet is that flocks would get killed all at once by hunters. The birds would try to come back and hang around the dead ones instead of scattering.

        • 1 year ago
          Anonymous

          It’s as other anons have said, unfortunately.
          >Passenger Pigeons
          They utterly relied on the vast hardwood forests which blanketed Pre-Columbian North America to roost and breed. They were an extremely gregarious species, and the chopping of woodlands by Native Americans before 1492 (which yes, very much occurred) were offset by the mobility of those peoples and the forms agriculture they practiced, which left new trees to rapidly grow back in the places they had once been removed from. Their flocks easily numbered in the millions at their prime, and while migrating they could block out the sun over a region for hours at a time. European settlers/hunters saw this and reacted the only way they knew how: shooting as many as they could out of the sky for food and sport. It’s important to remember that the concept of Extinction didn’t exist at this time, so they had no concerns for the environmental consequences of this behavior, as well as the mass deforestation they were continually engaged in. Numbers unsurprisingly began to plummet into the 19th century, with some US scientists and politicians suspecting that the birds were being wiped out, but such a thing was seen as inconceivable by most, and by the time the obvious was undeniable, it was too late. A silver lining though: the rapid and shocking destruction of the Passenger Pigeon served as clear evidence for those in science, government and the general public that Extinction was a real phenomenon that could happen even to previously ubiquitous species, and it was pivotal in future legislation which now protects similar creatures from unintended destruction.

          • 1 year ago
            Anonymous

            >it was pivotal in future legislation which now protects similar creatures from unintended destruction
            Yet the number of species and habitats that became/are becoming extinct due to anthropogenic pressure only increased

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