10 beautiful ways to honor and remember your deceased pet

There are many people who truly understand the grief of losing a pet. In fact, nine out of 10 people consider their dog full-fledged members of their family, with 56% saying they mourn their deceased pet more than an extended family member.

It's obvious we love our pets. The pet industry makes a fortune. Last year, Americans spent a record $56 billion on their pets. It's estimated Britons will spend more than $7 billion on their pets in 2015 and Canada's spending is somewhere around $6.6 billion. That spent money doesn't just go to food and supplies, either. Within those numbers, Americans spend $350 million on just pet Halloween costumes.

We don't need statistics, however, to tell us how much we love our pets. Just ask someone about their pet and out comes the phone to show you the latest video of their cat. So when our pets pass, it can be just as difficult as losing a beloved family member. (Human one, that is.) So what do you do?

Turn them into a stuffed animal

For those who don't quite have the money for cloning services, Cuddle Clones might be a good second option. The company uses multiple pictures of your pet that you send them and creates an eerie stuffed replica. Although it's not $100,000 expensive, due to being a custom item, the replica is a bit pricey. Dogs, cats, horses and other large pets are priced at $249, and small pets cost $179.

Create a fund in their name

If your pet was well-loved by many, consider creating a fund where people can donate to a good cause in their honor.

Clone them

That's how far some are willing to go for their pet. But many of us don't have stacks of money piled up, or are just plain creeped out by the idea of cloning.

Turn them into a diamond

Diamonds are forever. There are plenty of places that can take ashes and turn them into diamonds. They may be expensive, but it's a great way you can carry your pet with you all the time.

Have them freeze dried

A pet schnauzer preserved with a freeze-drying technique at Mac's Taxidermy in Fort Loudon, Penn.

This might be a little morbid for some, but for others, it may bring a sense of comfort. This process is different from taxidermy, as taxidermy skins the deceased animal and stretches the skin over a generic body mold. The result can be very different from what your pet looked like while they were alive. Freeze drying leaves your pet in their original body. The whole process could end up taking six months to a year and costs upwards of $1,000.

Wear their ashes around your neck

If a diamond is a little out of your price range, you can have their ashes put into a cylinder, pendant or pretty bead to be worn as a necklace.

Get a tattoo… with their ashes

The tattoo of Thor.

That's what Swindon-based bodybuilder Duncan did when his dog, Thor, passed away in 2012. Duncan now has Thor's portrait on his body and his ashes in his body when the tattoo artist mixed the ashes with ink. Using ashes as part of tattoo ink has gained in popularity over the years — for both humans and pet ashes.

Get a memorial tattoo, hold the ashes

You don't have to go as far as getting your pet's ashes embedded into your body, but you can still find a way to have them with you permanently. It's not uncommon, and even a few celebrities have ink that honors their pets. When her beloved dog passed away, Jennifer Aniston honored him by having his name inked on her foot. Similarly, Miley Cyrus has her dog, Floyd, tattooed on her side.

Plant something in their honor

Turn your loss into something beautiful. If you choose to bury your pet on your property, plant a tree or flowers in their resting place. You'll be able to bring new life in the world and have something that reminds you of them every time you look at it. Put a memorial stone next to their resting place so others will know what it stands for.

Turn them into fireworks

If your pet was lively and full of spark, give them a send-off that fits their personality! There are a couple services out there that can create a custom firework for your pet. Honor your pet by gathering friends and family to sit and watch the spectacle.

Lindsay Patton

Lindsay Patton-Carson has been published in xoJane, Jezebel, The Huffington Post, and some other places in the corners of the Internet. She loves David Bowie, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, running, relating to Liz Lemon, feminism, pop culture and animals. Particularly her two rescue dogs.

  1. 7 years ago
    Sherry B.

    This appears as a hoax joke! How twisted is this?

    1) Turn them into a stuffed animal ?

    2) Have them freeze dried ?

    3) Get a tattoo… with their ashes?

    4) Get a memorial tattoo, hold the ashes?

    5) Plant something in their honor - Good Idea-

    6) Create a fund in their name - May Be Possible-

    7) Turn them into a diamond - NO WAY!

    8) Wear their ashes around your neck - One size does not fit all...

    9) Turn them into fireworks - How Sinister! 🙂

    You should have far better sense than to post this twisted article. It is jaw dropping to me! How about these twisted minds bask in the Loving memories of their pets?
    All but a few of these suggestions are worthwhile, they only accent the grief of the loss! Clinging to dead things and reinventing them is beyond barbaric and is more so as Norman Bates did with his Mother in the old movie Psycho'-

    Shall you turn you BeLoved into a stuffed person, freeze dry them or turn them into fireworks? For crying out loud, think before you act! Stop clinging to death and cling to life and the life that was given to you and your precious pet while alive!

  2. 7 years ago
    Tiana G.

    I'm a glass blower, and one day it occurred to me to try and incorporate cremains of my beloved beagle and schnauzer into a piece of art glass. They came out beautiful. I'll do it now with every one of my animals who pass. It takes very little ash, so this allows me to scatter the remainder of their ashes in a favorite place, but I get to keep part of them with me as well. I've put the glass pieces on an acrylic base and am having name tags made which I will attach. So much more personal than the wooden box the crematorium returns to you.

  3. 7 years ago
    Darla G.

    Here's another great way to honor your pet....after you've had time to grieve, go out and adopt another pet from a shelter or rescue. That's the greatest honor there is, to save another pet's life. Meanwhile, I'm thinking about getting a memorial tattoo. I also have Buddy's ashes in a pendant that I can wear and a small vial of his ashes attached to my keychain. I'm thinking about using a small amount of his ashes and having a glass pendant made. He was the love of my life and has been gone for 17 months; I miss him every second of every day.

  4. 7 years ago
    Stardust N.

    I also bury mine with their favorite blanket , & I agree with others who think these are weird, far-fetched, & downright creepy, I also honor my passed fur kids by rescuing another, my last one, Bentley Marlowe, was so great I had to rescue 2! He would approve.

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