Alright we have to talk about these peckers

I've had like 3 or 4 of they come for years to my place. Here's the thing. I put a tiny ass feeder in a new plot I fixed up and it has 1 port. I bought a new 5 port and put it somewhere else because it's easier for me to see when I sit on the porch.

Will they go to the new one or are they so lazy that I have to take the old one down so they go to the other one. I don't know if they go between points or they always go to the closest one despite how shitty the feeder is. Also the new feeder has solution in it that's fancy, not just sugar water.

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the one animal where consuming sugar makes dietary sense and isn't a poison that will make you fat and unhealthy. they fly so hard they need the energy contained in sugar

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      A lot of animals need the energy contained in sugar

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    This vine is so cool.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Would it be a bad idea to plant it at the base of a live tree and let it climb?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Depends on the tree.
        A 50 foot oak? Sure.
        A 5 foot Japanese maple? No.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Neither an oak or japanese maple is suitable for a bine. It has no stickers. It's best growing up a pole or arbor where it twines itself around the supports. Coral honeysuckle doesn't have stickers like english ivy or virginia creeper.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            What about a densely branched helm hedgerow?

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I want to build a hummingbird garden for ruby throated fellas. I heard that any plant that grows tall enough with red tubular flowers should attract them. Right now I've got a coral honeysuckle and it works like a wonder! I tried a scarlet bee balm, but it died from someone somehow mistaking it for a weed. Red lobelias and spigelias would be great to get soon! But I was wondering what you guys have had luck with. What are your favorite hummingbird plants?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Zinias. Mine aren't tall enough right not, but I bought them because at my aunt's outside of philly (like 20 mins out) they use to fight over the Zinias! They come and check the Hibiscus but don't get to drink from it. They'll check anything red out, it's cool to see them just inspect things like cats.

      Get them a swing up higher than the feeders too. They love to swing, they're like retarded dumbasses just fucking a round swinging for 10 seconds (which to them is like an hour I think).

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Zinias. Mine aren't tall enough right not, but I bought them because at my aunt's outside of philly (like 20 mins out) they use to fight over the Zinias! They come and check the Hibiscus but don't get to drink from it. They'll check anything red out, it's cool to see them just inspect things like cats.

      Get them a swing up higher than the feeders too. They love to swing, they're like retarded dumbasses just fucking a round swinging for 10 seconds (which to them is like an hour I think).

      Forgot pic
      These are said swings. You might be able to make one yourself. It's odd but they will only sit DIRECTLY in the center. It's mathematical or some shit it's weird how they know the geometric center of the swing. Tthat's why if you make one yourself you need to match the dimensions closely.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Hummingbirds can not "walk".
        It's a sacrifice they made for aeronautics.
        If you've ever seen a bird "side step" across a branch- hummingbirds can't do that.
        So where they land is kind of important.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Alright OP, check this shit out.

    Many years ago I put up a couple feeders around my property.
    One was in a maple tree next to my porch.
    I found out that males are territorial and any feeder within about 30 feet of "his turf", he'll defend. So I have feeders strategically placed at 30+ foot intervals.

    Fast forward a couple years.
    The season had just started and hummingbirds were coming in, but everybody wasn't here yet. Because my colony is so large I have about 20 feeders but I (used to) put them out one at a time as everybody returns for the season.
    So I was sitting on my porch and I hear a hummingbird behind me. I turned around and see a female just hovering under a branch. She hovers for about 5 seconds then leaves. A couple minutes she returns, hovers and then leaves.
    The third time she did this I realized she was hovering under the hanger in the maple tree where I usually have a feeder. So I quickly went and filled up a feeder and put it in the maple.
    Within 30 seconds she was back and feeding from that feeder.

    She was on my property the year before (probably hatched here) and had her favorite feeder.
    Then flew 1,200 miles to spend the winter in a central American jungle.
    Then flew 1,200 miles back and was able to zero on on not just the state she was born in, not just the county, not just the city, not the the neighborhood, not just the house, not even "just" the tree- the the actual fucking branch where her favorite food source is suppose to be.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ruby throated hummingbirds arive on the same day every year (+/- 1 day depending on weather) so now I make sure all feeders are out- I just start the season with 1/8 fill.
      Some of my feeders (8oz) I have to refill daily.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah I get rubys. I live in PA. They ended up coming to the new feeder, but I don't know if it was another one or the same one (I have 1 or 2 females and 1 male). All 3 go to the small feeder, I want them to go to the big one BUT, they just checked it out I don't know if they'll go there for realzies.

        So, what time of year should I set them up? March? I'll draw a picture.

        I LOVE nuthatches, bluebirds, downies, flickers, and hummingbirds.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I report first sightings every year.

          https://maps.journeynorth.org/map/?map=hummingbird-ruby-throated-first&year=2022

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you have 2 females then you should get a minimum of 4 hatchligs this year (hummingbirds always lay 2 eggs and if weather is good and food sources are abundant they'll lay a second clutch at the end of the season).
            The young should go to the new feeders.

            With 1 male and 2 females its one group (males will have harems) so the females feed in the males territory- the original feeder.

            Over the years I watch different feeders become the most popular as generations rotate. Feeder A may be the most popular but his offspring use other feeders. When the male from feeder A dies and his offspring build their own harems then feeders B and C become busy.
            Hummingbirds live short lives- typically about 4 years.

            Alright this answered everything. I'll just leave the feeders where they are and set them back up in mid April.

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Be sure to have the feeders up BEFORE they come by. There's always a chance theyll go somewhere else if the feeders arent there. And you can pick up a new yearling that hasn't found a good home yet.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          If you have 2 females then you should get a minimum of 4 hatchligs this year (hummingbirds always lay 2 eggs and if weather is good and food sources are abundant they'll lay a second clutch at the end of the season).
          The young should go to the new feeders.

          With 1 male and 2 females its one group (males will have harems) so the females feed in the males territory- the original feeder.

          Over the years I watch different feeders become the most popular as generations rotate. Feeder A may be the most popular but his offspring use other feeders. When the male from feeder A dies and his offspring build their own harems then feeders B and C become busy.
          Hummingbirds live short lives- typically about 4 years.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >b-b-but animals can't be intelligent because their brains are smaller! that's just coincidence which your larger brain is recognizing a pattern in *tips fedora*
      Shitposting aside that's pretty cool. I never experience shit like that.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Give them the nectar we know you have it

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah but it's in the feeder. Are they only going to go to the one feeder closest to their hideout or are they going to go to the better one?

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Holy shit what a retard
    Do you have to bring this up on every board? What is wrong with you?

    I just want to know about feeder behavior. . .

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